Applied Nutrition® Pre-Meal Carb Blocker

Applied Nutrition® Pre-Meal Carb Blocker - IRWIN NATURALS - GNC Zoom
Online Only
  • Share:

Offers:

  • Free Shipping on Orders of $49 or More. Details

Price: $19.99

Member Price: $15.99 (Save 20%)

Backorder Details

Item #686659

Size: 40 Veggie Capsules

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $19.99

Member Price: $15.99
Ship every:
Add to Cart

Product Information

Description

Take Before High-Carb Meals!
40 Veggie Capsules

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

You can download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader here.

Supplement Facts

Serving Size 2 Veggie Capsules
Servings Per Container 20
Amount Per Serving % DV
Common Bean (White Kidney Bean) extract (20:1)(fruit) 1000.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

(Adult) Take two (2) Veggie Capsules twice daily before starchy meals and snacks. For optimum results, use in conjunction with a low calorie diet and exercise plan. Take Veggie Capsules with a full glass (8 oz.) of water.

Other Ingredients: Rice Flour, hypromellose, Magnesium Stearate, Silicon Dioxide

Warning: Do not use if safety seal is broken. Check with your doctor before using this product if you are using medication or have any medical conditions, including digestive disorders or acid reflux disease. Do not use if you may become pregnant, are pregnant or nursing. Do not exceed recommended daily intake. Not intended for use by persons under 18. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. Store in a cool, dry place.
Warning: (State of California Prop 65) This product contains a chemical known to the State of California to cause birth defects or other reproductive harm.

Applied Nutrition, P.O. Box 66457, Los Angeles, CA 90066

You May Also Consider These Products:

Ask A Question

Customer Reviews

Health Notes

Amylase Inhibitors

Amylase Inhibitors
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Amylase inhibitors, when given with a starchy meal, can reduce the usual rise in blood sugar levels of people with diabetes.(more)
Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Amylase inhibitors, when given with a starchy meal, can reduce the usual rise in blood sugar levels of people with diabetes.(more)
Obesity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Amylase inhibitors contain substances that prevent dietary carbohydrates from being absorbed by the body and may aid in weight loss.(more)
Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Starch blockers are substances that inhibit amylase, the digestive enzyme required to break down dietary starches for normal absorption. Controlled research has demonstrated that concentrated starch blocker extracts, when given with a starchy meal, can reduce the usual rise in blood sugar levels of both healthy people and diabetics.1, 2, 3, 4, 5 While this effect could be helpful in controlling diabetes, no research has investigated the long-term effects of taking starch blockers for this condition.

References

1. Boivin M, Zinsmeister AR, Go VL, DiMagno EP. Effect of a purified amylase inhibitor on carbohydrate metabolism after a mixed meal in healthy humans. Mayo Clin Proc 1987;62:249-55.

2. Boivin M, Flourie B, Rizza RA, et al. Gastrointestinal and metabolic effects of amylase inhibition in diabetics. Gastroenterology 1988;94:387-94.

3. Lankisch M, Layer P, Rizza RA, DiMagno EP. Acute postprandial gastrointestinal and metabolic effects of wheat amylase inhibitor (WAI) in normal, obese, and diabetic humans. Pancreas 1998;17:176-81.

4. Holt PR, Thea D, Yang MY, Kotler DP. Intestinal and metabolic responses to an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor in normal volunteers. Metabolism 1988;37:1163-70.

5. Layer P, Rizza RA, Zinsmeister AR, et al. Effect of a purified amylase inhibitor on carbohydrate tolerance in normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. Mayo Clin Proc 1986;61:442-7.

Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructionsStarch blockers are substances that inhibit amylase, the digestive enzyme required to break down dietary starches for normal absorption. Controlled research has demonstrated that concentrated starch blocker extracts, when given with a starchy meal, can reduce the usual rise in blood sugar levels of both healthy people and diabetics.1, 2, 3, 4, 5 While this effect could be helpful in controlling diabetes, no research has investigated the long-term effects of taking starch blockers for this condition.
References

1. Boivin M, Zinsmeister AR, Go VL, DiMagno EP. Effect of a purified amylase inhibitor on carbohydrate metabolism after a mixed meal in healthy humans. Mayo Clin Proc 1987;62:249-55.

2. Boivin M, Flourie B, Rizza RA, et al. Gastrointestinal and metabolic effects of amylase inhibition in diabetics. Gastroenterology 1988;94:387-94.

3. Lankisch M, Layer P, Rizza RA, DiMagno EP. Acute postprandial gastrointestinal and metabolic effects of wheat amylase inhibitor (WAI) in normal, obese, and diabetic humans. Pancreas 1998;17:176-81.

4. Holt PR, Thea D, Yang MY, Kotler DP. Intestinal and metabolic responses to an alpha-glucosidase inhibitor in normal volunteers. Metabolism 1988;37:1163-70.

5. Layer P, Rizza RA, Zinsmeister AR, et al. Effect of a purified amylase inhibitor on carbohydrate tolerance in normal subjects and patients with diabetes mellitus. Mayo Clin Proc 1986;61:442-7.

Obesity
Dose: Refer to label instructionsAmylase inhibitors are also known as starch blockers because they contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body. Starches are complex carbohydrates that cannot be absorbed unless they are first broken down by the digestive enzyme amylase and other, secondary, enzymes.1, 2 When starch blockers were first developed years ago, they were found not to be potent enough to prevent the absorption of a significant amount of carbohydrate.3, 4, 5, 6 Recently, highly concentrated starch blockers have been shown to be more effective,7, 8, 9 but no published human studies exist investigating their usefulness for weight loss.
References

1. Marshall JJ, Lauda CM. Purification and properties of phaseolamin, an inhibitor of alpha-amylase, from the kidney bean, Phaseolus vulgaris. J Biol Chem 1975;250:8030-7.

2. Choudhury A, Maeda K, Murayama R, DiMagno EP. Character of a wheat amylase inhibitor preparation and effects on fasting human pancreaticobiliary secretions and hormones. Gastroenterology 1996;111:1313-20.

3. Bo-Linn GW, Santa Ana CA, Morawski SG, Fordtran JS. Starch blockers-their effect on calorie absorption from a high-starch meal. N Engl J Med 1982;307:1413-6.

4. Hollenbeck CB, Coulston AM, Quan R, et al. Effects of a commercial starch blocker preparation on carbohydrate digestion and absorption: in vivo and in vitro studies. Am J Clin Nutr 1983;38:498-503.

5. Garrow JS, Scott PF, Heels S, et al. A study of 'starch blockers' in man using 13C-enriched starch as a tracer. Hum Nutr Clin Nutr 1983;37:301-5.

6. Carlson GL, Li BU, Bass P, Olsen WA. A bean alpha-amylase inhibitor formulation (starch blocker) is ineffective in man. Science 1983;219:393-5.

7. Brugge WR, Rosenfeld MS. Impairment of starch absorption by a potent amylase inhibitor. Am J Gastroenterol 1987;82:718-22.

8. Boivin M, Zinsmeister AR, Go VL, DiMagno EP. Effect of a purified amylase inhibitor on carbohydrate metabolism after a mixed meal in healthy humans. Mayo Clin Proc 1987;62:249-55.

9. Layer P, Carlson GL, DiMagno EP. Partially purified white bean amylase inhibitor reduces starch digestion in vitro and inactivates intraduodenal amylase in humans. Gastroenterology 1985;88:1895-902.

Amylase inhibitors are also known as starch blockers because they contain substances that prevent dietary starches from being absorbed by the body. Starches are complex carbohydrates that cannot be absorbed unless they are first broken down by the digestive enzyme amylase and other, secondary, enzymes.1, 2 They are claimed to be useful for weight loss, but when they were first developed years ago, research did not find them very effective for limiting carbohydrate absorption.3, 4, 5, 6 Later, however, highly concentrated versions of amylase inhibitors did show potential for reducing carbohydrate absorption in humans.7, 8, 9

Copyright 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

Learn more about Healthnotes, the company.

The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.