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Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps All-One Hemp Eucalyptus Pure-Castile Bar Soap

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Description
Made with Organic Oils!


Emmanuel Bronner, a third-generation German-Jewish master soapmaker, brought the family's old world soap recipes to the US in the late 1920's and established what has become the top-selling natural brand of liquid and bar soaps in America. In addition to producing an exceptional lather and smooth afterfeel, our soaps support fair trade, organic agriculture and a healthy environment.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

Other Ingredients: Saponified Organic Coconut, Organic Palm & Organic Olive Oils (w/ Retained Glycerin), Water, Organic Hemp Oil, organic jojoba oil, Organic Eucalypus Oil, Salt, Citric Acid, Vitamin E

Cruelty Free, No Animal Testing, Expeller-Pressed and Hexane-Free.

For all major ingredients we are going FAIR TRADE
Organic Coconut, Olive, Peppermint and Palm Oils from Sources that Follow Real Fair Trade Rules
95+% of Our Agricultural Volume Benefiting Farmers, Families and Communities in the Developing World
Thank You for Your Support!
Developed and Distributed By:
Dr. Bronner's Magic Soaps
Box 28, Escondido, CA 92033
Oregon Tilth Certified Organic

Health Notes

Eucalyptus

Eucalyptus
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Sinusitis
Dose: Take an amount containing 200 mg of cineole three times daily
The main ingredient of eucalyptus oil, cineole, may help speed the healing of acute sinusitis.(more)
Sinus Congestion
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus oil is often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. (more)
Sinusitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus oil is often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. It acts on receptors in the nasal mucous membranes, leading to less stuffiness.(more)
Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Historically, herbal practitioners have recommended a steam inhalation of eucalyptus vapor to help treat asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough, and emphysema.(more)
Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus is an herb that directly attack microbes.(more)
Bronchitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus leaf tea is used to treat bronchitis and inflammation of the throat, and is considered antimicrobial.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Eucalyptus oil
Eucalyptus oil is often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion.(more)
Athletic Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus-based rubs have been found to warm muscles in athletes. This suggests that eucalyptus may help relieve minor muscle soreness when applied topically.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
A combination of eucalyptus and peppermint oil applied directly to a painful area may help by decreasing pain and increasing blood flow to afflicted regions.(more)
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus oil has been used historically to treat rheumatoid arthritis. Applied to painful joints, it may help relieve rheumatoid arthritis symptoms.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
A combination of eucalyptus and peppermint oil applied directly to a painful area may help by decreasing pain and increasing blood flow to afflicted regions.(more)
Halitosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Volatile oils made from eucalyptus have antibacterial properties and may be effective in mouthwash or toothpaste form.(more)
Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Eucalyptus is used traditionally to promote mucus discharge.(more)
Sinusitis
Dose: Take an amount containing 200 mg of cineole three times daily

The main ingredient of eucalyptus oil, cineole, has been studied as a treatment for sinusitis. In a double-blind study of people with acute sinusitis that did not require treatment with antibiotics, those given cineole orally in the amount of 200 mg 3 times per day recovered significantly faster than those given a placebo.1 Eucalyptus oil is also often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. Eucalyptus oil is said to function in a fashion similar to menthol by acting on receptors in the nasal mucous membranes, leading to a reduction in the symptoms of nasal stuffiness.2

References

1. Kehrl W, Sonnemann U, Dethlefsen U. Therapy for acute nonpurulent rhinosinusitis with cineole: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Laryngoscope2004;114:738-42.

2. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy, 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 146-7.

Sinus Congestion
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

Eucalyptus oil is often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. Eucalyptus oil is said to function in a fashion similar to that of menthol by acting on receptors in the nasal mucous membranes, leading to a reduction in the symptoms of nasal stuffiness.1

References

1. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy, 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 146-7.

Sinusitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

The main ingredient of eucalyptus oil, cineole, has been studied as a treatment for sinusitis. In a double-blind study of people with acute sinusitis that did not require treatment with antibiotics, those given cineole orally in the amount of 200 mg 3 times per day recovered significantly faster than those given a placebo.1 Eucalyptus oil is also often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. Eucalyptus oil is said to function in a fashion similar to menthol by acting on receptors in the nasal mucous membranes, leading to a reduction in the symptoms of nasal stuffiness.2
References

1. Kehrl W, Sonnemann U, Dethlefsen U. Therapy for acute nonpurulent rhinosinusitis with cineole: results of a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Laryngoscope2004;114:738-42.

2. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy, 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 146-7.

Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

The early 19th-century Eclectic physicians in the United States (who used herbs as their main medicine) not only employed eucalyptus oil to sterilize instruments and wounds but also recommended a steam inhalation of the oil's vapor to help treat asthma, bronchitis, whooping cough, and emphysema.1

References

1. Castleman M. The Healing Herbs. Emmaus, PA: Rodale Press, 1991, 162-3.

Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

Herbs that directly attack microbes include the following: chaparral, eucalyptus, garlic, green tea, lemon balm (antiviral), lomatium, myrrh, olive leaf, onion, oregano, pau d'arco (antifungal), rosemary, sage, sandalwood, St. John's wort, tea tree oil, thyme, and usnea.
Bronchitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

Eucalyptus leaf tea is used to treat bronchitis and inflammation of the throat,1 and is considered antimicrobial. In traditional herbal medicine, eucalyptus tea or volatile oil is often used internally as well as externally over the chest; both uses are approved for people with bronchitis by the German Commission E.2

References

1. Wichtl M. Herbal Drugs and Phytopharmaceuticals. Boca Raton, FL: CRC press, 1994,192-4.

2. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al, eds. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 126-8.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Eucalyptus oil

Eucalyptus oil is often used in a steam inhalation to help clear nasal and sinus congestion. It is said to work similarly to menthol, by acting on receptors in the nasal mucous membranes, leading to a reduction of nasal stuffiness.1Peppermint may have a similar action and is a source of small amounts of menthol.

References

1. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy, 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag, 1998, 146-7.

Athletic Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructionsEucalyptus-based rubs have been found to warm muscles in athletes.1 This suggests that eucalyptus may help relieve minor muscle soreness when applied topically, though studies are needed to confirm this possibility.
References

1. Hong CZ, Shellock FG. Effects of a topically applied counterirritant (Eucalyptamint) on cutaneous blood flow and on skin and muscle temperatures. A placebo-controlled study. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1991;70:29-33.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

A combination of eucalyptus and peppermint oil applied directly to a painful area may help. Preliminary research indicates that the counter-irritant quality of these essential oils may decrease pain and increase blood flow to afflicted regions.1 Peppermint and eucalyptus, diluted in an oil base, are usually applied several times per day, or as needed, to control pain. Plant oils that may have similar properties are rosemary, juniper, and wintergreen.

References

1. Hong CZ, Shellock FG. Effects of a topically applied counterirritant (Eucalyptamint) on cutaneous blood flow and on skin and muscle temperatures. A placebo-controlled study. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1991;70:29-33.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Topical applications of several botanical oils are approved by the German government for relieving symptoms of RA.1 These include primarily cajeput (Melaleuca leucodendra) oil, camphor oil, eucalyptus oil, fir (Abies alba and Picea abies) needle oil, pine (Pinus spp.) needle oil, and rosemary oil. A few drops of oil or more can be applied to painful joints several times a day as needed. Most of these topical applications are based on historical use and are lacking modern clinical trials to support their effectiveness in treating RA.

References

1. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al., eds. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 430-1.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

A combination of eucalyptus and peppermint oil applied directly to a painful area may help. Preliminary research indicates that the counter-irritant quality of these essential oils may decrease pain and increase blood flow to afflicted regions.1 Peppermint and eucalyptus, diluted in an oil base, are usually applied several times per day, or as needed, to control pain. Plant oils that may have similar properties are rosemary, juniper, and wintergreen.

References

1. Hong CZ, Shellock FG. Effects of a topically applied counterirritant (Eucalyptamint) on cutaneous blood flow and on skin and muscle temperatures. A placebo-controlled study. Am J Phys Med Rehabil 1991;70:29-33.

Halitosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

The potent effects of some commercial mouthwashes may be due to the inclusion of thymol (from thyme) and eukalyptol (from eucalyptus)-volatile oils that have proven activity against bacteria. One report showed bacterial counts plummet in as little as 30 seconds following a mouthrinse with the commercial mouthwash Listerine, which contains thymol and eukalyptol.1 Thymol alone has been shown in research to inhibit the growth of bacteria found in the mouth.2, 3 Because of their antibacterial properties, other volatile oils made from tea tree,4 clove, caraway, peppermint, and sage,5 as well as the herbs myrrh6 and bloodroot,7 might be considered in a mouthwash or toothpaste. Due to potential allergic reactions and potential side effects if some of these oils are swallowed, it is best to consult with a qualified healthcare professional before pursuing self-treatment with volatile oils that are not in approved over-the-counter products for halitosis.
References

1. Kato T, Iijima H, Ishihara K, et al. Antibacterial effects of Listerine on oral bacteria. Bull Tokyo Dent Coll 1990;31:301-7.

2. Cosentino S, Tuberoso CI, Pisano B, et al. In-vitro antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of Sardinian Thymus essential oils. Lett Appl Microbiol 1999;29:130-5.

3. Petersson LG, Edwardsson S, Arends J. Antimicrobial effect of a dental varnish, in vitro. Swed Dent J 1992;16:183-9.

4. Cox SD, Mann CM, Markham JL, et al. The mode of antimicrobial action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil). J Appl Microbiol 2000;88:170-5.

5. Serfaty R, Itic J. Comparative trial with natural herbal mouthwash versus chlorhexidine in gingivitis. J Clin Dent 1988;1:A34-7.

6. Dolara P, Corte B, Ghelardini C, et al. Local anaesthetic, antibacterial and antifungal properties of sesquiterpenes from myrrh. Planta Med 2000;66:356-8.

7. Hannah JJ, Johnson JD, Kuftinec MM. Long-term clinical evaluation of toothpaste and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract in controlling plaque, gingival inflammation, and sulcular bleeding during orthodontic treatment. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 1989;96:199-207.

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Do not use eucalyptus oil internally without supervision by a healthcare professional. As little as 3.5 ml of the oil taken internally has proven fatal.

Herbs commonly used as expectorants in traditional medicine include eucalyptus, elecampane, lobelia, yerba santa (Eriodictyon californicum), wild cherry bark, gumweed (Grindelia robusta), and anise(Pimpinella anisum). Animal studies have suggested that some of these herbs increase discharge of mucus.1 However, none have been studied for efficacy in humans.

References

1. Boyd EM. Expectorants and respiratory tract fluid. Pharmacol Rev 1954;6:521-42 [review].

Parts Used & Where Grown

Eucalyptus is an evergreen tree native to Australia but is cultivated worldwide. The plant's leaves-and the oil that is steam-distilled from them-are used medicinally.1

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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