Product Images
GNC Herbal PlusŪ Whole Herb Licorice Root - GNC HERBAL PLUS STANDARDIZED - GNC Zoom
Product Videos

GNC Herbal PlusŪ Whole Herb Licorice Root

Shop all GNC Herbal Plus Standardized

100 Vegetarian Capsules

Item #188301 See Product Details

Price: $9.99

Member Price: $8.99 Become a Member

Availability: In Stock Details

Available Promotions:

  • Not Eligible for 25% Off Discount. Details
  • Buy One Get One 50% Off Mix and Match Wellness Products! Details
  • $3.99 Flat Rate Shipping! Details

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $9.99

Member Price: $8.99 Become a Member
Ship every:
Add to Cart
People Who Buy This Also Bought
You May Also Be Interested In
More Sizes Available
Description
Traditional Digestive Health Herb*

This product is ship restricted to California.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

As a dietary supplement, take one capsule daily.

Serving Size 1 Capsule
Servings Per Container 100
Amount Per Serving % DV
Licorice Root Powder (Glycyrrhiza glabra) 450.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Vegetable Cellulose Capsule, Cellulose

No sugar, no starch, no artificial colors, no artificial flavors, no preservatives, no Wheat, no gluten, no corn, no dairy, yeast free.

Warning: Consult your physician prior to using this product if you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, or have a medical condition. Discontinue use two weeks prior to surgery.

Distributed by: General Nutrition Corporation Pittsburgh, PA 15222

Health Notes

Licorice

Licorice
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Peptic Ulcer
Dose: 250 to 500 mg chewable DGL before meals and bedtime
Licorice root has a long history of use for soothing inflamed and injured mucous membranes in the digestive tract. Flavonoids in licorice may also inhibit growth of H. pylori.(more)
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
Dose: Chew 250 to 500 mg DGL daily before meals and bedtime
Chewing deglycyrrhizinated licorice may help mucous membranes heal.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice protects the mucous membranes lining the digestive tract by increasing the production of mucin, a compound that protects against the adverse effects of stomach acid and various harmful substances.(more)
Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice root has been traditionally used to soothe stomach inflammation and injury. Its flavonoid constituents have been found to stall the growth of H. pylori in test tube studies.(more)
Ulcerative Colitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice is an anti-inflammatory and soothing herb that may be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.(more)
Crohn's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice is an anti-inflammatory herb historically recommended by doctors for people with Crohn's disease.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: 5 to 8 ounces of tea, four to six times per day, for two to seven days
In one study, Throat Coat tea was effective in providing rapid, temporary relief of sore throat pain in people with acute pharyngitis.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice inhibits HIV reproduction in test tubes, supplementing with it may be safe and effective for long-term treatment of HIV infection.(more)
Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice has a long history of use for relieving coughs.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The herbal formula sho-saiko-to has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells in people infected with HIV.(more)
Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice in the form of a cream or gel may be applied directly to cold sores in order to speed healing and reduce pain.(more)
Canker Sores
Dose: Mix 200 mg DGL in 200 ml in warm water and swish in mouth several minutes, four times per day
Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) and warm water applied to the inside of the mouth may speed the healing of canker sores. Chewable DGL tablets may have the same effect.(more)
Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice in the form of a cream or gel may be applied directly to cold sores in order to speed healing and reduce pain.(more)
Colic
Dose: 1/2 cup (118 ml) of tea up to three times daily
A soothing tea made from chamomile, vervain, licorice, fennel, and lemon balm has been shown to relieve colic more effectively than placebo.(more)
Asthma
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice, which has a soothing effect on bronchioles, has traditionally been used for asthma.(more)
Hay Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptoms, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.(more)
Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice is an herb with weak estrogen-like actions similar to soy. In one trial, a formula containing licorice, burdock, dong quai, wild yam, and motherwort reduced menopause symptoms.(more)
Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice is an herb with weak estrogen-like actions similar to soy. In one trial, a formula containing licorice, burdock, dong quai, wild yam, and motherwort reduced menopause symptoms.(more)
Eczema
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice may help eczema through its anti-inflammatory effects and its ability to affect the immune system.(more)
Shingles and Postherpetic Neuralgia
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Licorice has been used as a topical treatment for shingles and postherpetic neuralgia.(more)
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructions
A case report described a man with CFS whose symptoms improved after taking 2.5 grams of licorice root daily. (more)
Peptic Ulcer
Dose: 250 to 500 mg chewable DGL before meals and bedtime

Licorice root has a long history of use for soothing inflamed and injured mucous membranes in the digestive tract. Licorice may protect the stomach and duodenum by increasing production of mucin, a substance that protects the lining of these organs against stomach acid and other harmful substances.1 According to laboratory research, flavonoids in licorice may also inhibit growth of H. pylori.2

Chamomile has a soothing effect on inflamed and irritated mucous membranes. It is also high in the flavonoid apigenin-another flavonoid that has inhibited growth of H. pylori in test tubes.3 Many doctors recommend drinking two to three cups of strong chamomile tea each day. The tea can be made by combining 3 to 5 ml of chamomile tincture with hot water or by steeping 2 to 3 tsp of chamomile flowers in the water, covered, for 10 to 15 minutes. Chamomile is also available in capsules; two may be taken three times per day.

References

1. Goso Y, Ogata Y, Ishihara K, Hotta K. Effects of traditional herbal medicine on gastric mucin against ethanol-induced gastric injury in rats. Comp Biochem Physiol 1996;113C:17-21.

2. Beil W, Birkholz C, Sewing KF. Effects of flavonoids on parietal cell acid secretion, gastric mucosal prostaglandin production and Helicobacter pylori growth. Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45:697-700.

3. Beil W, Birkholz C, Sewing KF. Effects of flavonoids on parietal cell acid secretion, gastric mucosal prostaglandin production and Helicobacter pylori growth. Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45:697-700.

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
Dose: Chew 250 to 500 mg DGL daily before meals and bedtime

Licorice, particularly as chewable deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL), has been shown to be an effective treatment for the healing of stomach and duodenal ulcers;1, 2, 3 in an uncontrolled trial, licorice was effective as a treatment for aphthous ulcers (canker sores).4 A synthetic drug similar to an ingredient of licorice has been used as part of an effective therapy for GERD in both uncontrolled5 and double-blind6, 7 trials. In a comparison trial, this combination proved to be as effective as cimetidine (Tagamet), a common drug used to treat GERD.8 However, licorice itself remains unexamined as a treatment for GERD.

References

1. Morgan AG, Pacsoo C, McAdam WA. Maintenance therapy: A two year comparison between Caved-S and cimetidine treatment in the prevention of symptomatic gastric ulcer. Gut 1985;26:599-602.

2. Kassir ZA. Endoscopic controlled trial of four drug regimens in the treatment of chronic duodenal ulceration. Ir Med J 1985;78:153-6.

3. Glick L. Deglycyrrhinated licorice in peptic ulcer. Lancet 1982;ii:817 [letter].

4. Das SK, Gulati AK, Singh VP. Deglycyrrhizinated licorice in aphthous ulcers. J Assoc Physicians India 1989; 37:647.

5. Markham C, Reed PI. Pyrogastrone treatment of peptic oesophagitis: analysis of 104 patients treated during a 3 1/2-year period. Scand J Gastroenterol Suppl 1980;65:73-82.

6. Reed PI, Davies WA. Controlled trial of a carbenoxolone/alginate antacid combination in reflux oesophagitis. Curr Med Res Opin 1978;5:637-44.

7. Young GP, Nagy GS, Myren J, et al. Treatment of reflux oesophagitis with a carbenoxolone/antacid/alginate preparation. A double-blind controlled trial. Scand J Gastroenterol 1986;21:1098-104.

8. Maxton DG, Heald J, Whorwell PJ, Haboubi NY. Controlled trial of pyrogastrone and cimetidine in the treatment of reflux oesophagitis. Gut 1990;31:351-4.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Demulcents herbs may be used to treat indigestion and heartburn. These herbs seem to work by decreasing inflammation and forming a physical barrier against stomach acid or other abdominal irritants. Examples of demulcent herbs include ginger, licorice, and slippery elm.

Licorice protects the mucous membranes lining the digestive tract by increasing the production of mucin, a compound that protects against the adverse effects of stomach acid and various harmful substances.1 The extract of licorice root that is most often used by people with indigestion is known as deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). Glycyrrhizin, which occurs naturally in licorice root, has cortisone-like effects and can cause high blood pressure, water retention, and other problems in some people. When the glycyrrhizin is removed to form DGL, the licorice root retains its beneficial effects against indigestion, while the risk of side effects is greatly reduced. The usual suggested amount of DGL is one or two chewable tablets (250-500 mg per tablet), chewed and swallowed 15 minutes before meals and one to two hours before bedtime.2 Although many research trials show that DGL is helpful for people with peptic ulcers, the use of DGL for heartburn and indigestion is based primarily on anecdotal information.

References

1. Goso Y, Ogata Y, Ishihara K, Hotta K. Effects of traditional herbal medicine on gastric acid. Biochem Physiol 1996;113C:17-21.

2. Reed PI, Davies WA. Controlled trial of a carbenoxolone/alginate antacid combination in reflux oesophagitis. Curr Med Res Opin 1978;5:637-44.

Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Many of the same herbs that are helpful for peptic ulcers may also aid people with gastritis. Licorice root, for example, has been traditionally used to soothe inflammation and injury in the stomach. Its flavonoid constituents have been found to stall the growth of H. pylori in test tube studies.1 However, there have been no clinical trials using licorice to treat gastritis. To avoid potential side effects, such as increasing blood pressure and water weight gain, many physicians recommend deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). This form of licorice retains its healing qualities by removing the glycyrrhizin that causes problems in some people.

References

1. Beil W, Birkholz C, Sewing KF. Effects of flavonoids on parietal cell acid secretion, gastric mucosal prostaglandin production and Helicobacter pylori growth. Arzneimittelforschung 1995;45:697-700.

Ulcerative Colitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Aloe vera juice has anti-inflammatory activity and been used by some doctors for people with UC. In a double-blind study of people with mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis, supplementation with aloe resulted in a complete remission or an improvement in symptoms in 47% of cases, compared with 14% of those given a placebo (a statistically significant difference).1 No significant side effects were seen. The amount of aloe used was 100 ml (approximately 3.5 ounces) twice a day for four weeks. Other traditional anti-inflammatory and soothing herbs, including calendula, flaxseed, licorice, marshmallow, myrrh, and yarrow. Many of these herbs are most effective, according to clinical experience, if taken internally as well as in enema form.2 Enemas should be avoided during acute flare-ups but are useful for mild and chronic inflammation. It is best to consult with a doctor experienced with botanical medicine to learn more about herbal enemas before using them. More research needs to be done to determine the effectiveness of these herbs.

References

1. Langmead L, Feakins RM, Goldthorpe S, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral aloe vera gel for active ulcerative colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2004;19:739-47.

2. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1989, 114-5.

Crohn's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

A variety of anti-inflammatory herbs historically have been recommended by doctors for people with Crohn's disease. These include yarrow, chamomile, licorice, and aloe juice. Cathartic preparations of aloe should be avoided. No research has been conducted to validate the use of these herbs for Crohn's disease.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: 5 to 8 ounces of tea, four to six times per day, for two to seven days

In a double-blind study, a proprietary product containing marshmallow root, licorice root, and elm bark (Throat Coat) was effective in providing rapid, temporary relief of sore throat pain in people with acute pharyngitis.1 Throat Coat was taken as a tea in the amount of 5 to 8 ounces, 4 to 6 times per day, for two to seven days.

References

1. Brinckmann J, Sigwart H, van Houten Taylor L. Safety and efficacy of a traditional herbal medicine (Throat Coat) in symptomatic temporary relief of pain in patients with acute pharyngitis: a multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. J Altern Complement Med 2003;9:285-98.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Licorice has shown the ability to inhibit reproduction of HIV in test tubes.1 Clinical trials have shown that injections of glycyrrhizin (isolated from licorice) may have a beneficial effect on AIDS.2 There is preliminary evidence that orally administered licorice also may be safe and effective for long-term treatment of HIV infection.3 Amounts of licorice or glycyrrhizin used for treating HIV-positive people warrant monitoring by a physician, because long-term use of these substances can cause high blood pressure, potassium depletion, or other problems. Approximately 2 grams of licorice root should be taken per day in capsules or as tea. Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) will not inhibit HIV.

References

1. Ito M, Sato A, Hirabayashi K, et al. Mechanism of inhibitory effect of glycyrrhizin on replication of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Antivir Res 1988;10:289-98.

2. Hattori I, Ikematsu S, Koito A, et al. Preliminary evidence for inhibitory effect of glycyrrhizin on HIV replication in patients with AIDS. Antivir Res 1989;11:255-62.

3. Ikegami N, Akatani K, Imai M, et al. Prophylactic effect of long-term oral administration of glycyrrhizin on AIDS development of asymptomatic patients. Int Conf AIDS 1993;9:234 [abstract PO-A25-0596].

Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The mucilage of slippery elm gives it a soothing effect for coughs. Usnea also contains mucilage, which may be helpful in easing irritating coughs. There is a long tradition of using wild cherry syrups to treat coughs. Other traditional remedies to relieve coughs include bloodroot, catnip, comfrey (the above-ground parts, not the root), horehound, elecampane, mullein, lobelia, hyssop, licorice, mallow, (Malvia sylvestris),red clover, ivy leaf, pennyroyal(Hedeoma pulegioides, Mentha pulegium),onion, (Allium cepa), and plantain (Plantago lanceolata, P. major). None of these has been investigated in human trials, so their true efficacy for relieving coughs is unknown.1

References

1. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs.Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1999.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The Chinese herb bupleurum, as part of the herbal formula sho-saiko-to, has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells taken from people infected with HIV.1 Sho-saiko-to has also been shown to improve the efficacy of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine in the test tube.2 One preliminary study found that 7 of 13 people with HIV given sho-saiko-to had improvements in immune function.3 Double-blind trials are needed to determine whether bupleurum or sho-saiko-to might benefit people with HIV infection or AIDS. Other herbs in sho-saiko-to have also been shown to have anti-HIV activity in the test tube, most notably Asian scullcap.4 Therefore studies on sho-saiko-to cannot be taken to mean that bupleurum is the only active herb involved. The other ingredients are peony root, pinellia root, cassia bark, ginger root, jujube fruit, Asian ginseng root, Asian scullcap root, and licorice root.

References

1. Inada Y, Watanabe K, Kamiyama M, et al. In vitro immunomodulatory effects of traditional Kampo medicine (sho-saiko-to: SST) on peripheral mononuclear cells in patients with AIDS. Biomed Pharmacother 1990;44:17-9.

2. Piras G, Makino M, Baba M. Sho-saiko-to, a traditional kampo medicine, enhances the anti-HIV-1 activity of lamivudine (3TC) in vitro. Microbiol Immunol 1997;41:835-9.

3. Fujimaki M, Hada M, Ikematsu S, et al. Clinical efficacy of two kinds of kampo medicine on HIV infected patients. Int Conf AIDS 1989;5:400 [abstract no. W.B.P.292].

4. Li BQ, Fu T, Yan YD, et al. Inhibition of HIV infection by baicalin-a flavonoid compound purified from Chinese herbal medicine. Cell Mol Biol Res 1993;39:119-24.

Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Licorice in the form of a cream or gel may be applied directly to herpes sores three to four times per day. Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin or glycyrrhetinic acid should be used, as these are the constituents in licorice most likely to provide activity against the herpes simplex virus. There are no controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness of this treatment, but a cream containing a synthetic version of glycyrrhetinic acid (carbenoxolone) was reported to speed healing time and reduce pain in people with herpes simplex.1

References

1. Partridge M, Poswillo D. Topical carbenoxolone sodium in the management of herpes simplex infection. Br J Oral Maxillfac Surg 1984;22:138-45.

Canker Sores
Dose: Mix 200 mg DGL in 200 ml in warm water and swish in mouth several minutes, four times per day

Licorice that has had the glycyrrhizic acid removed is called deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL). Glycyrrhizic acid is the portion of licorice root that can increase blood pressure and cause water retention in some people. The wound-healing and soothing components of the root remain in DGL.

A mixture of DGL and warm water applied to the inside of the mouth may shorten the healing time for canker sores, according to a double-blind trial.1 This DGL mixture is made by combining 200 mg of powdered DGL and 200 ml of warm water. It can then be swished in the mouth for two to three minutes, then spit out. This procedure may be repeated each morning and evening for one week. Chewable DGL tablets may be an acceptable substitute.

References

1. Das SK, Gulati AK, Singh VP. Deglycyrrhizinated licorice in aphthous ulcers. J Assoc Physicians India 1989; 37:647.

Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Licorice in the form of a cream or gel may be applied directly to herpes sores three to four times per day. Licorice extracts containing glycyrrhizin or glycyrrhetinic acid should be used, as these are the constituents in licorice most likely to provide activity against the herpes simplex virus. There are no controlled trials demonstrating the effectiveness of this treatment, but a cream containing a synthetic version of glycyrrhetinic acid (carbenoxolone) was reported to speed healing time and reduce pain in people with herpes simplex.1

References

1. Partridge M, Poswillo D. Topical carbenoxolone sodium in the management of herpes simplex infection. Br J Oral Maxillfac Surg 1984;22:138-45.

Colic
Dose: 1/2 cup (118 ml) of tea up to three times daily

Carminatives are a class of herbs commonly used for infants with colic. These herbs tend to relax intestinal spasms.

Chamomile is a carminative with long history of use as a calming herb and may be used to ease intestinal cramping in colicky infants. A soothing tea made from chamomile, vervain, licorice, fennel, and lemon balm has been shown to relieve colic more effectively than placebo.1 In this study, approximately 1/2 cup (150 ml) of tea was given during each colic episode up to a maximum of three times per day.

References

1. Weizman Z, Alkrinawi S, Goldfarb D, et al. Efficacy of herbal tea preparation in infantile colic. J Pediatr 1993;122:650-2.

Asthma
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Traditionally, herbs that have a soothing action on bronchioles are also used for asthma. These include marshmallow, mullein, hyssop, and licorice. Elecampane has been used traditionally to treat coughs associated with asthma.1

References

1. Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Food, Drugs, and Cosmetics. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 222-4.

Hay Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptom, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.1 Sho-seiryu-to contains licorice, cassia bark, schisandra, ma huang, ginger, peony root, pinellia, and asiasarum root.

References

1. Baba S, Takasaka T. Double-blind clinical trial of sho-seiryu-to (TJ-19) for perennial nasal allergy. Clin Otolaryngol 1995;88:389-405.

Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions

A variety of herbs with weak estrogen-like actions similar to the effects of soy have traditionally been used for women with menopausal symptoms.1 These herbs include licorice, alfalfa, and red clover. In a double-blind trial, a formula containing tinctures of licorice, burdock, dong quai, wild yam, and motherwort (30 drops three times daily) was found to reduce symptoms of menopause.2 No effects on hormone levels were detected in this study. In a separate double-blind trial, supplementation with dong quai (4.5 grams three times daily in capsules) had no effect on menopausal symptoms or hormone levels.3 A double-blind trial using a standardized extract of subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum), a relative of red clover, containing 40 mg isoflavones per tablet did not impact symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, though it did improve function of the arteries.4 An extract of red clover, providing 82 mg of isoflavones per day, also was ineffective in a 12-week double-blind study.5 In another double-blind study, however, administration of 80 mg of isoflavones per day from red clover reduced the frequency of hot flashes in postmenopausal women. The benefit was noticeable after 4 weeks of treatment and became more pronounced after a total of 12 weeks.6

References

1. Crawford AM. The Herbal Menopause Book. Freedom, CA: Crossing Press, 1996.

2. Hudson TS, Standish L, Breed C, et al. Clinical and endocrinological effects of a menopausal botanical formula. J Naturopathic Med 1997;7(1):73-7.

3. Hirata JD, Swiersz LM, Zell B, et al. Does dong quai have estrogenic effects in postmenopausal women? A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Fertil Steril 1997;68:981-6.

4. Nestel PJ, Pomeroy S, Kay S, et al. Isoflavones from red clover improve systemic arterial compliance but not plasma lipids in menopausal women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1999;84:895-8.

5. Tice JA, Ettinger B, Ensrud K, et al. Phytoestrogen supplements for the treatment of hot flashes: the Isoflavone Clover Extract (ICE) Study: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2003;290:207-14.

6. van de Weijer PHM, Barentsen R. Isoflavones from red clover (Promensil(R)) significantly reduce menopausal hot flush symptoms compared with placebo. Maturitas 2002;42:187-93.

Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions

A variety of herbs with weak estrogen-like actions similar to the effects of soy have traditionally been used for women with menopausal symptoms.1 These herbs include licorice, alfalfa, and red clover. In a double-blind trial, a formula containing tinctures of licorice, burdock, dong quai, wild yam, and motherwort (30 drops three times daily) was found to reduce symptoms of menopause.2 No effects on hormone levels were detected in this study. In a separate double-blind trial, supplementation with dong quai (4.5 grams three times daily in capsules) had no effect on menopausal symptoms or hormone levels.3 A double-blind trial using a standardized extract of subterranean clover (Trifolium subterraneum), a relative of red clover, containing 40 mg isoflavones per tablet did not impact symptoms of menopause, such as hot flashes, though it did improve function of the arteries.4 An extract of red clover, providing 82 mg of isoflavones per day, also was ineffective in a 12-week double-blind study.5 In another double-blind study, however, administration of 80 mg of isoflavones per day from red clover reduced the frequency of hot flashes in postmenopausal women. The benefit was noticeable after 4 weeks of treatment and became more pronounced after a total of 12 weeks.6

References

1. Crawford AM. The Herbal Menopause Book. Freedom, CA: Crossing Press, 1996.

2. Hudson TS, Standish L, Breed C, et al. Clinical and endocrinological effects of a menopausal botanical formula. J Naturopathic Med 1997;7(1):73-7.

3. Hirata JD, Swiersz LM, Zell B, et al. Does dong quai have estrogenic effects in postmenopausal women? A double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Fertil Steril 1997;68:981-6.

4. Nestel PJ, Pomeroy S, Kay S, et al. Isoflavones from red clover improve systemic arterial compliance but not plasma lipids in menopausal women. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1999;84:895-8.

5. Tice JA, Ettinger B, Ensrud K, et al. Phytoestrogen supplements for the treatment of hot flashes: the Isoflavone Clover Extract (ICE) Study: a randomized controlled trial. JAMA 2003;290:207-14.

6. van de Weijer PHM, Barentsen R. Isoflavones from red clover (Promensil(R)) significantly reduce menopausal hot flush symptoms compared with placebo. Maturitas 2002;42:187-93.

Eczema
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Zemaphyte, a traditional Chinese herbal preparation that includes licorice as well as nine other herbs, has been successful in treating childhood and adult eczema in double-blind trials.1, 2, 3 One or two packets of the combination is mixed in hot water and taken once per day. Because one study included the same amount of licorice in both the placebo and the active medicine, it is unlikely that licorice is the main active component of Zemaphyte.4

Several Chinese herbal creams for eczema have been found to be adulterated with steroids. The authors of one study found that 8 of 11 Chinese herbal creams purchased without prescription in England contained a powerful steroid drug used to treat inflammatory skin conditions.5

References

1. Sheehan MP, Atherton DJ. One-year follow up of children treated with Chinese medical herbs for atopic eczema. Br J Dermatol 1994;130:488-93.

2. Sheehan MP, Rustin MH, Atherton DJ, et al. Efficacy of traditional Chinese herbal therapy in adult atopic dermatitis. Lancet 1992;340:13-7.

3. Sheehan M, Stevens H, Ostlere L, et al. Follow-up of adult patients with atopic eczema treated with Chinese herbal therapy for 1 year. Clin Exp Dermatol 1995;20:136-40.

4. Sheehan MP, Atherton DJ. A controlled trial of traditional Chinese medicinal plants in widespread non-exudative atopic eczema. Br J Dermatol 1992;126:179-84.

5. Keane FM, Munn SE, du Vivier AWP, et al. Analysis of Chinese herbal creams prescribed for dermatological conditions. BMJ 1999;318:563-4.

Shingles and Postherpetic Neuralgia
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Licorice has been used by doctors as a topical agent for shingles and postherpetic neuralgia; however, no clinical trials support its use for this purpose. Glycyrrhizin, one of the active components of licorice, has been shown to block the replication of Varicella zoster.1 Licorice gel is usually applied three or more times per day. Licorice gel is not widely available but may be obtained through a doctor who practices herbal medicine.

References

1. Baba M, Shigeta S. Antiviral activity of glycyrrhizin against varicella-zoster virus in vitro. Antivir Res 1987;7:99-107.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructions

One case report described a man with CFS whose symptoms improved after taking 2.5 grams of licorice root daily.1 While there have been no controlled trials to test licorice in patients with CFS, it may be worth a trial of six to eight weeks using 2 to 3 grams of licorice root daily.

References

1. Baschetti R. Chronic fatigue syndrome and liquorice. New Z Med J 1995;108:156-7 [letter].

Parts Used & Where Grown

Originally from central Europe, licorice now grows all across Europe and Asia. The root is used medicinally.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

Label
To view the Label you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed. You can download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader at: http://www.adobe.com/acrobat/readstep.html
Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
GNC HERBAL PLUS STANDARDIZEDGNC Herbal Plus® Whole Herb Licorice Root
 
4.5

(based on 2 reviews)

Reviewed by 2 customers

Sort by

Displaying reviews 1-2

Back to top

(3 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

Great Product

By Aragornfin

from Texas

About Me Budget Buyer

See all my reviews

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Effective
  • Good Value

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Daily Use
    • Men

    Comments about GNC HERBAL PLUS STANDARDIZED GNC Herbal Plus® Whole Herb Licorice Root:

    I have ordered this product before and started using it as an alternative for my asthama and it has really helped. My only complaint is not the product, but the shipping. it comes via UPS Innovations (AKA) the USPS. My order was shipped on time and was supposed to arrive on 12/17/2012 and as of today 01/01/2013 I have yet to recieve it.

    • My Beauty Routine Takes:
    • 10 Minutes

    (2 of 12 customers found this review helpful)

     
    4.0

    Seems to work so far

    By eschluss

    from Bellevue, Ne

    About Me Budget Buyer

    See all my reviews

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Easy To Use
    • Effective
    • Good Value

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Daily Use

      Comments about GNC HERBAL PLUS STANDARDIZED GNC Herbal Plus® Whole Herb Licorice Root:

      None

      • My Beauty Routine Takes:
      • 10 Minutes

      Displaying reviews 1-2

      Back to top

      Ask A Question