Hydroxycut™ Pro Clinical

Hydroxycut™ Pro Clinical - IOVATE - GNC Zoom
  • Share:

Offers:

  • Buy 2 Products Save 20%, Buy 3 Or More Products Save 30%. Enter Code MARBMSM at Checkout! Details
  • Free Shipping on Orders of $49 or More. Details

Price: $19.99

In Stock Details

Item #801800

Size: 72 Rapid Release Caplets

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $19.99

Ship every:
Add to Cart

Product Information

Description

New Advanced Formula!

Advanced Weight Loss*
Boost Meatbolism*
Increase Energy*

#1 In America - It Really Works!
Thank you, America, for making Hydroxycut® America's #1 Selling Weight Loss Supplement Brand! Millions from coast to coast have chosen Hydroxycut® to help them reach their weight loss goals. Science, Quality and Purity have been the focus for Hydroxycut® for the past 20 years. The result is over 95 million bottles sold. Hydroxycut® really works!*

New Advanced Formula - More Convenient!
Hydroxycut® provides powerful weight loss in a convenient twice-a-day advanced formula.* Now you only need two servings per day versus three servings of the previous formula.

Increase Energy For Your Busy Lifestyle
Scientifically researched ingredient caffeine anhydrous (1,3,7-trimethylxanthine) is shown to boost your metabolism and provide fast-acting energy so you can keep up with your busy lifestyle.*

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

You can download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader here.

Supplement Facts

Serving Size 2 Rapid Release Caplets
Servings Per Container 36
Amount Per Serving % DV
Calcium 170.00 mg17%
Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 7.00 mg12%
Calcium 145.00 mg15%
Hydroxycut® Blend 441.00**
 Weight-Loss Plus Matrix **
 HydroxyBoost+ **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

To assess individual tolerance, for the first three days, start with one (1) caplet, taken with a glass of water two (2) times daily, approximately 30 to 60 minutes before your twi main meals. For days 4 and beyond, follow the chart below. Do not exceed two (2) caplets in a 4-hour period and/or four (4) caplets in a 24-hour period. Do not take within 5 hours of bedtime.
For best results use Hydroxycut® for 60 days in conjunction wiht a calorie-reduced diet and regular exercise program. Consume 8 to 10 glasses of water per day. Read the entire label before use and follow directions.

Day 1 to Day 3 - 1 caplet, 2x daily
Day 4 & Beyond - 2 caplets, 2x daily

Other Ingredients: Microcrystalline Cellulose, Dicalcium Phosphate Dihydrate, Pre-gelatinized starch, Stearic Acid, Coating (Titanium dioxide, Polyethylene glycol, Talc), Croscarmellose Sodium, Magnesium Stearate, Silicon Dioxide

Warning: Not intended for use by persons under 18. Do not use if pregnant or nursing. Discontinue use and consult a medical doctor immediately if you experience unusual symptoms. Consult a medical doctor before use if you have been treated for, or diagnosed with or have a family history of any medical condition, or if you are using any prescription or over-the-counter drug(s), including blood thinners. Consult a medical doctor before starting any diet or exercise program. Do not exceed recommended serving. Improper use of this product will not improve results and is not advised. Use only as directed. Do not use if packaging has been tampered with. Store in a cool, dry place (60°F to 80°F). KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Distributed by Iovate Health Sciences U.S.A. Inc. 1105 North Market Street, Suite 1330, Wilmington, DE 19801. Made in the U.S.A. from international ingredients.

You May Also Consider These Products:

Ask A Question

Customer Reviews

Health Notes

Food as Medicine: The Pros & Cons

Food as Medicine: The Pros & Cons
Food as Medicine: The Pros & Cons 
: Main Image
People should consider what they eat and drink while taking medication
Everyone knows it: Eating well is almost universally the first-line defense for both managing and treating many diseases. But not everyone realizes that food's "medicinal" properties can also influence medicines in the body-enough that people should consider what they eat and drink while taking medication.

Delicious, nutritious...and therapeutic

Some foods are packed with disease-fighting nutrients that have been shown to help with particular conditions. For example:

  • Grapefruit is a rich source of vitamin C and flavonoids, and may even help lower high cholesterol levels.
  • Pomegranate has been shown to slow atherosclerosis progression.
  • Dark-green leafy vegetables are loaded with lutein (for healthy eyes), magnesium (for a strong heart and reducing negative effects of stress), and fiber (for healthy digestion).

While these tasty, wholesome foods have these proven benefits and more, each is also known to interact with certain prescription medications-some with potentially serious consequences.

What we eat affects body chemistry

Eating to support health makes food a kind of medicine-and viewing it as that is a helpful reminder that what we eat creates chemical reactions in the body. So adding more chemical reactions-such as supplements and drugs-to the mix should be done with some consideration. The types of interactions that food may have with medicines include:

  • Beneficial: Replenishes depleted nutrients: Eating more of a nutrient-rich food may help replenish nutrients when a medication obstructs or depletes it from the body.
  • Beneficial: Side effect prevention: Eating more of a nutrient-rich food may help prevent or reduce the likelihood or severity of a potential side effect caused by a medication. Taking certain medications on an empty stomach can sometimes cause side effects such as nausea, solved by taking the medication with a meal.
  • Beneficial: Positive interaction: Some medications are more easily absorbed when taken with food, improving their action in the body. Some, for example, are fat-soluble, and could be affected by the amount of fat in the diet.
  • Adverse: Reduces drug effectiveness: When taking a medication, a food, nutrient, or other substance should be avoided as it may increase or decrease the medication's absorption and/or activity in the body. Sometimes just having too much food in the stomach can block a medicine's action, which can be avoided by taking it on an empty stomach.
  • Adverse: Negative interaction: When taking certain medications, a food, nutrient, or other substance should be avoided, as the combination may cause undesirable or dangerous interactions. It is generally recommended to avoid foods that have been shown to interact with a medicine.

Spotlight on some highly interactive foods

Drug interactions are not often studied, and animal and test tube studies, which don't always translate to clinical effects, are often the primary sources of information. But following research over time has revealed some foods that should be avoided or taken with care when under medical treatment:

  • Grapefruit and grapefruit juice: By inhibiting an intestinal enzyme that helps metabolize many different drugs, grapefruit allows more of certain drugs to be absorbed, potentially increasing the medication's effectiveness and the toxicity, even if the grapefruit is consumed at a different time than the drug. A few of the long list of interacting drugs include amlodipine, atorvastatin (Lipitor), cyclosporine, diltiazem, felodipine, lovastatin, methylprednisolone, nifedipine, sildenafil, simvastatin (Zocor), and verapamil.
  • Pomegranate and pomegranate juice: This fruit inhibits the same enzyme blocked by grapefruit. While there is much less research on drug-pomegranate interactions than on drug-grapefruit interactions, it would be reasonable to assume that the same interactions that occur with grapefruit would also occur with pomegranate.
  • Dark-green vegetables: These are rich sources of vitamin K, which interferes with the blood-thinner, warfarin. A person taking warfarin does not have to avoid vitamin K-containing foods. However, with the aid of a doctor or a dietitian the average vitamin K intake should be kept relatively constant from week to week.

The key to health is conscientious consumption

While the strength of research varies, there is enough data to suggest a number of other interactions between foods and drugs, such as:

  • Alcohol, which should not be mixed with certain medications
  • High-calcium foods which can block the absorption of some drugs
  • Black tea, some spices, beer, and nutrients such as resveratrol (found in red wine, nuts, and dark chocolate) have been found to have various interactions with medications.

To get the benefits of both a healthful diet and prescription medications, without exposing yourself to potentially harmful interactions, look for credible science-based information and talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

An expert in nutritional therapies, Chief Medical Editor Alan R. Gaby, MD, is a former professor at Bastyr University of Natural Health Sciences, where he served as the Endowed Professor of Nutrition. He is past-president of the American Holistic Medical Association and gave expert testimony to the White House Commission on Complementary and Alternative Medicine on the cost-effectiveness of nutritional supplements. Dr. Gaby has conducted nutritional seminars for physicians and has collected over 30,000 scientific papers related to the field of nutritional and natural medicine. In addition to editing and contributing to The Natural Pharmacy (Three Rivers Press, 1999), and the A-Z Guide to Drug-Herb-Vitamin Interactions (Three Rivers Press, 1999), Dr. Gaby has authored Preventing and Reversing Osteoporosis (Prima Lifestyles, 1995) and B6: The Natural Healer (Keats, 1987) and coauthored The Patient's Book of Natural Healing (Prima, 1999).

Copyright 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

Learn more about Healthnotes, the company.