Naturade Pea Protein Powder Chocolate

Naturade Pea Protein Powder Chocolate - GREEN FOODS - GNC Zoom
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Size: 16.5 oz(s)

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Product Information

Description

Naturade Pea Protein Powder Chocolate provides all the benefits of pea protein in a delicious chocolate shake! Pea Protein is a natural plant-based protein that is derived from yellow peas (Pisum sativum), also known as "split peas." This product is highly soluble, easy to digest, hypoallergenic - and it tastes great! Naturade Pea Protein is formulated using only the highest quality pea protein isolate available. Its phenomenal amino acid profile includes nine essential amino acids. Since essential amino acids cannot be synthesized by the human body, they must be supplied by our diets. Amino acids are the building blocks of proteins and are used by our bodies to support our bones, muscles, and connective tissues.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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Supplement Facts

Serving Size 2 Scoops
Servings Per Container 12

Product Directions / Additional Info

Mix 2 scoops (39g) with 8-10 ounces of cold water or your favorite beverage. For best results mix in a shaker or blender for 30 seconds. For a delicious smoothie, mix with crushed ice and fruit in a blender.

1 City Blvd. West Suite 1440Orange, CA,

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Health Notes

Pea Protein

Pea Protein
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Hypertension
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Pea protein may help reduce blood pressure.(more)
Cardiovascular Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Pea protein might help prevent cardiovascular disease by lowering cholesterol and triglyceride levels.(more)
Athletic Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Pea protein may help build muscle and help athletes recover after exercise. (more)
Obesity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Pea protein can be part of a high-protein diet. High-protein diets have been shown to help prevent and treat obesity.[REF][REF](more)
Hypertension
Dose: Refer to label instructionsPea protein is high in arginine, an amino acid that keeps blood vessels healthy and can reduce high blood pressure.1 In addition, there is evidence that enzymes produced in the purification of pea protein could help lower blood pressure.2, 3, 4A combination protein isolate supplement made from pea, soy, egg, and milk was found to lower high blood pressure more than the placebo in people with high blood pressure taking 20 grams three times per day for four weeks.5 In a three-week preliminary trial, hydrolyzed pea protein alone reduced blood pressure in people with high blood pressure.6
References

1. Dong J, Qin L, Zhang Z, et al. Effect of oral L-arginine supplementation on blood pressure: a meta-analysis of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials. Am Heart J 2011;162:959-65. doi: 10.1016/j.ahj.2011.09.012. Epub 2011 Nov 8. [review]

2. Aluko R. Determination of nutritional and bioactive properties of peptides in enzymatic pea, chickpea, and mung bean protein hydrolysates. J AOAC Int 2008;91:947-56.

3. Li H, Aluko R. Identification and inhibitory properties of multifunctional peptides from pea protein hydrolysate. J Agric Food Chem 2010;58:11471-6. doi: 10.1021/jf102538g. Epub 2010 Oct 7.

4. Boschin G, Scigliuolo G, Resta D, Arnoldi A. ACE-inhibitory activity of enzymatic protein hydrolysates from lupin and other legumes. Food Chem 2014;145:34-40. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2013.07.076. Epub 2013 Jul 24.

5. Teunissen-Beekman K, Dopheide J, Geleijnse J, et al. Protein supplementation lowers blood pressure in overweight adults: effect of dietary proteins on blood pressure (PROPRES), a randomized trial. Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:966-71. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.111.029116. Epub 2012 Feb 22.

6. Li H, PrairieN, Udenigwe C, et al. Blood pressure lowering effect of a pea protein hydrolysate in hypertensive rats and humans. J Agric Food Chem 2011;59:9854-60. doi: 10.1021/jf201911p. Epub 2011 Sep 2.

Cardiovascular Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructionsA pea protein supplement lowered cholesterol and triglyceride levels more than casein protein in rats.1 Whether pea protein has the same effect in humans is not yet known.
References

1. Rigamonti E, Parolini C, Marchesi M, et al. Hypolipidemic effect of dietary pea proteins: Impact on genes regulating hepatic lipid metabolism. Mol Nutr Food Res 2010;54 Suppl 1:S24-30. doi: 10.1002/mnfr.200900251.

Athletic Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructionsPea protein is a good source of branched-chain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine, and valine),1 which are needed for muscle building and repair.2 Researchers have found that the amino acids in hydrolyzed protein supplements are highly available for muscle repair after muscle fiber damaging exercise and other causes of muscle injury.3 Some, but not all, studies show that protein supplements may help athletes by reducing soreness and speeding recovery after exercise, and increasing muscle mass gains.4 Whether pea protein has advantages over other protein supplements for athletes has not yet been determined.
References

1. Rubio L, Perez A, Ruiz R, et al. Characterization of pea (Pisum sativum) seed protein fractions. J Sci Food Agric 2014;94:280-7. doi: 10.1002/jsfa.6250. Epub 2013 Jul 8.

2. Phillips S, Van Loon, L. Dietary protein for athletes: from requirements to optimum adaptation. J Sports Sci 2011;29 Suppl 1:S29-38. doi: 10.1080/02640414.2011.619204. [review]

3. Thomson R, Buckley J. Protein hydrolysates and tissue repair. Nutr Res Rev 2011;24:191-7. doi: 10.1017/S0954422411000084. Epub 2011 Nov 21. [review]

4. McLellan T. Protein supplementation for military personnel: a review of the mechanisms and performance outcomes. J Nutr 2013;143:1820S-1833S. doi: 10.3945/jn.113.176313. Epub 2013 Sep 11. [review]

Obesity
Dose: Refer to label instructionsPea protein is rich in branched-chain amino acids that have specifically been found to aid in weight loss and improve body composition.1 Pea protein may also affect weight loss by reducing appetite. Compared to whey protein and milk protein, 15 grams of pea protein was found to be better at inducing satiety (a sense of fullness) in overweight people.2 In a study looking at protein supplements and food consumption in healthy weight men, 20 grams of pea protein was as effective as casein protein and better than whey and egg protein at increasing fullness and reducing calorie intake when taken 30 minutes before a meal. None of the protein supplements reduced appetite or calorie intake when taken immediately before a meal.3
References

1. Bianchi G, Marzocchi R, Agostini F, Marchesini G. Update on nutritional supplementation with branched-chain amino acids. Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care 2005;8:83-7. [review]

2. Diepvens K, Haberer D, Westerterp-Plantenga M. Different proteins and biopeptides differently affect satiety and anorexigenic/orexigenic hormones in healthy humans. Int J Obes 2008;32:510-8. doi: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0803758. Epub 2007 Nov 27.

3. Abou-Samra R, Keersmaekers L, Brienza D, et al. Effect of different protein sources on satiation and short-term satiety when consumed as a starter. Nutr J 2011;10:139. doi: 10.1186/1475-2891-10-139.

Pea protein is extracted from green and yellow peas (Pisum sativum, best known as split peas) and is used in some protein supplements and protein-enriched foods. Vegetarians and vegans may prefer supplements with pea protein to supplements with protein derived from dairy (such as casein and whey proteins), eggs, or meat. Pea protein is lactose-free and is safe for people with allergies or sensitivities to dairy and eggs. Peas are in the legume family, and people with allergies to other legumes like peanuts and soybeans should be cautious when introducing pea protein into their diet because of the possibility of a pea allergy.1Peas are an important protein source for people in parts of Asia; however, like all legumes, peas are low in the essential amino acid, methionine.2, 3Rice, another staple of Asian diets, is high in methionine, and rice protein is sometimes added to pea protein supplements to complete the amino acid profile.4, 5

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.