Nature's Answer® Myrrh 2000mg

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Item #792731

Size: 1 fl. oz. (30mL)

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Description

Advanced Botanical Fingerprint
Commiphora molmol
Our organic alcohol extracts are produced using our cold Bio-Chelated® proprietary process, yielding a Holistically Balanced® Advanced Fingerprint® extract are in the same synergistic ratios as in the plant.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

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Supplement Facts

Serving Size 2 mL
Servings Per Container 15
Amount Per Serving % DV
Myrrh (Commiphora Myrrha) Oleo-Gum-Resin Extract 2000.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

As a dietary supplement take 2 mL (56 drops) 1-3 times a day in a small amount of water.

Other Ingredients: 78-92% Certified Organic Alcohol

Gluten Free

Warning: Shake well.

Keep out of reach of children

DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT OR NURSING, DO NOT USE IF SAFETY SEAL IS DAMAGED OR MISSING, SHAKE WELL, KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN

Do not use if safety seal is broken or missing.

Nature's Answer™Hauppauge, NY 117888

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Health Notes

Myrrh

Myrrh
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Gingivitis
Dose: 0.5 ml in half a glass of water three times per day swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out
A mouthwash containing sage oil, peppermint oil, menthol, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from echinacea, myrrh tincture, clove oil, and caraway oil has been used successfully to treat gingivitis.(more)
Canker Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Myrrh is a traditional remedy with wound-healing properties that has a long history of use for mouth and gum irritations.(more)
Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In traditional herbal medicine, tinctures of various herbs including myrrh have been applied topically to herpes outbreaks in order to promote healing.(more)
Halitosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Volatile oils made from myrrh have antibacterial properties and may be effective in mouthwash or toothpaste form.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The resin of the herb myrrh has been shown to kill various microbes and to stimulate macrophages (a type of white blood cell).(more)
Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In traditional herbal medicine, tinctures of various herbs including myrrh have been applied topically to herpes outbreaks in order to promote healing.(more)
Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Myrrh is an herb that directly attack microbes.(more)
Ulcerative Colitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Myrrh is an anti-inflammatory and soothing herb that may be effective in the treatment of ulcerative colitis.(more)
Abnormal Pap Smear
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Though not proven in clinical trials, these herbs are used for their antiviral actions and thought to stimulate tissue healing. Consult a healthcare professional.(more)
Gingivitis
Dose: 0.5 ml in half a glass of water three times per day swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out

A mouthwash combination that includes sage oil, peppermint oil, menthol, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from echinacea, myrrh tincture, clove oil, and caraway oil has been used successfully to treat gingivitis.1 In cases of acute gum inflammation, 0.5 ml of the herbal mixture in half a glass of water three times daily is recommended by some herbalists. This herbal preparation should be swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out. To prevent recurrences, slightly less of the mixture can be used less frequently.

A toothpaste containing sage oil, peppermint oil, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from Echinacea purpurea, myrrh tincture, and rhatany tincture has been used to accompany this mouthwash in managing gingivitis.2

Of the many herbs listed above, chamomile, echinacea, and myrrh should be priorities. These three herbs can provide anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial actions critical to successfully treating gingivitis.

References

1. Serfaty R, Itic J. Comparative trial with natural herbal mouthwash versus chlorhexidine in gingivitis. J Clin Dent 1988;1:A34-7.

2. Yamnkell S, Emling RC. Two-month evaluation of Parodontax dentifrice. J Clin Dentistry 1988;1:A41.

Canker Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Myrrh, another traditional remedy with wound-healing properties, has a long history of use for mouth and gum irritations. Some herbalists suggest mixing 200 to 300 mg of herbal extract or 4 ml of myrrh tincture with warm water and swishing it in the mouth before swallowing; this can be done two to three times per day.

Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions

In traditional herbal medicine, tinctures of various herbs, including chaparral, St. John's wort, goldenseal, myrrh, and echinacea, have been applied topically to herpes outbreaks in order to promote healing.1

References

1. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs.Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1999.

Halitosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The potent effects of some commercial mouthwashes may be due to the inclusion of thymol (from thyme) and eukalyptol (from eucalyptus)-volatile oils that have proven activity against bacteria. One report showed bacterial counts plummet in as little as 30 seconds following a mouthrinse with the commercial mouthwash ListerineTM, which contains thymol and eukalyptol.1 Thymol alone has been shown in research to inhibit the growth of bacteria found in the mouth.2, 3 Because of their antibacterial properties, other volatile oils made from tea tree,4 clove, caraway, peppermint, and sage,5 as well as the herbs myrrh6 and bloodroot,7 might be considered in a mouthwash or toothpaste. Due to potential allergic reactions and potential side effects if some of these oils are swallowed, it is best to consult with a qualified healthcare professional before pursuing self-treatment with volatile oils that are not in approved over-the-counter products for halitosis.

References

1. Kato T, Iijima H, Ishihara K, et al. Antibacterial effects of Listerine on oral bacteria. Bull Tokyo Dent Coll 1990;31:301-7.

2. Cosentino S, Tuberoso CI, Pisano B, et al. In-vitro antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of Sardinian Thymus essential oils. Lett Appl Microbiol 1999;29:130-5.

3. Petersson LG, Edwardsson S, Arends J. Antimicrobial effect of a dental varnish, in vitro. Swed Dent J 1992;16:183-9.

4. Cox SD, Mann CM, Markham JL, et al. The mode of antimicrobial action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil). J Appl Microbiol 2000;88:170-5.

5. Serfaty R, Itic J. Comparative trial with natural herbal mouthwash versus chlorhexidine in gingivitis. J Clin Dent 1988;1:A34-7.

6. Dolara P, Corte B, Ghelardini C, et al. Local anaesthetic, antibacterial and antifungal properties of sesquiterpenes from myrrh. Planta Med 2000;66:356-8.

7. Hannah JJ, Johnson JD, Kuftinec MM. Long-term clinical evaluation of toothpaste and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract in controlling plaque, gingival inflammation, and sulcular bleeding during orthodontic treatment. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 1989;96:199-207.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Elderberry has shown antiviral activity and thus may be useful for some people with common colds. Elder flowers are a traditional diaphoretic remedy for helping to break fevers and promote sweating during a cold. Horseradish has antibiotic properties, which may account for its usefulness in easing throat and upper respiratory tract infections. The resin of the herb myrrh has been shown to kill various microbes and to stimulate macrophages (a type of white blood cell).1Usnea has a traditional reputation as an antiseptic and is sometimes used for people with common colds.2

References

1. Mills SY. Out of the Earth: The Essential Book of Herbal Medicine. New York: Viking Arkana, 1991.

2. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1985.

Cold Sores
Dose: Refer to label instructions

In traditional herbal medicine, tinctures of various herbs, including chaparral, St. John's wort, goldenseal, myrrh, and echinacea, have been applied topically to herpes outbreaks in order to promote healing.1

References

1. Blumenthal M, Goldberg A, Brinckmann J. Herbal Medicine: Expanded Commission E Monographs.Newton, MA: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1999.

Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbs that directly attack microbes include the following: chaparral, eucalyptus, garlic, green tea, lemon balm (antiviral), lomatium, myrrh, olive leaf, onion, oregano, pau d'arco (antifungal), rosemary, sage, sandalwood, St. John's wort, tea tree oil, thyme, and usnea.1

References

1. Murray MT. The Healing Power of Herbs. Rocklin, CA: Prima Publishing, 1995.

Ulcerative Colitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Aloe vera juice has anti-inflammatory activity and been used by some doctors for people with UC. In a double-blind study of people with mildly to moderately active ulcerative colitis, supplementation with aloe resulted in a complete remission or an improvement in symptoms in 47% of cases, compared with 14% of those given a placebo (a statistically significant difference).1 No significant side effects were seen. The amount of aloe used was 100 ml (approximately 3.5 ounces) twice a day for four weeks. Other traditional anti-inflammatory and soothing herbs, including calendula, flaxseed, licorice, marshmallow, myrrh, and yarrow. Many of these herbs are most effective, according to clinical experience, if taken internally as well as in enema form.2 Enemas should be avoided during acute flare-ups but are useful for mild and chronic inflammation. It is best to consult with a doctor experienced with botanical medicine to learn more about herbal enemas before using them. More research needs to be done to determine the effectiveness of these herbs.

References

1. Langmead L, Feakins RM, Goldthorpe S, et al. Randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of oral aloe vera gel for active ulcerative colitis. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2004;19:739-47.

2. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1989, 114-5.

Abnormal Pap Smear
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Several other herbs have been used as part of an approach for women with mild cervical dysplasia, including myrrh, echinacea, usnea, goldenseal, marshmallow, and yarrow.1 These herbs are used for their antiviral actions as well as to stimulate tissue healing; they are generally administered in a suppository preparation. No clinical trials have proven their effectiveness in treating cervical dysplasia. A doctor should be consulted to discuss the use and availability of these herbs.

References

1. Hudson T. Women's Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. Lincolnwood, IL: Keats, 1999, 54.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Myrrh grows as a shrub in desert regions, particularly in northeastern Africa and the Middle East. The resin obtained from the stems is used in medicinal preparations.

Copyright 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.