Nature's Gift DMSO Cream Rose Scented

Nature's Gift DMSO Cream Rose Scented - NATURES GIFT DMSO - GNC Zoom
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Product Information

Description

DMSO has been used for over 100 years in the United States. It is a natural substance derived from wood pulp and is harmless when used with the proper precautions. It is sold as a solvent. DMSO is an amazing substance that has many uses throughout the world.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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Supplement Facts

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Product Directions / Additional Info

99.9% Pure DMSO. This product is intended for use as a solvent only. The choice of the process used in the various applications is the sole responsibility of the user.

PO Box 439Ghent, KY,

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Health Notes

DMSO

DMSO
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Tendinitis
Dose: Apply a 10% gel twice per day under medical supervision
Dimethyl sulfoxide is anti-inflammatory and may be applied topically to reduce pain and swelling.(more)
Sprains and Strains
Dose: Refer to label instructions
DMSO has anti-inflammatory properties and may inhibit the transmission of pain messages by nerves. Supplementing with it may ease the pain of minor injuries.(more)
Osteoarthritis
Dose: Apply a gel containing 25% DMSO under the direction of a qualified healthcare practitioner
Topical DMSO appears to be anti-inflammatory and able to relieve pain associated with osteoarthritis, possibly by inhibiting the transmission of pain messages by nerves.(more)
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
When applied to the skin, DMSO has anti-inflammatory properties and alleviates pain, apparently by inhibiting the transmission of pain messages by nerves.(more)
Dupuytren's Contracture
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Supplemental dimethyl sulfoxide applied to the affected area may reduce pain by inhibiting transmission of pain messages, and may also soften the connective tissue.(more)
Peptic Ulcer
Dose: Refer to label instructions
DMSO is believed to have antioxidant activity and was found in one study to reduce relapse rates better than the ulcer drug cimetidine (Tagamet).(more)
Peyronie's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
(more)
Tendinitis
Dose: Apply a 10% gel twice per day under medical supervision

DMSO, or dimethyl sulfoxide, has a long history as a topical anti-inflammatory agent. One double-blind trial used a 10% DMSO gel topically on patients with tendinitis of the elbow and shoulder and found that it significantly reduced pain and inflammation in each joint.1 Other preliminary2, 3 and double-blind4, 5 trials found DMSO to be effective in treating tendinitis, but one double-blind trial found no difference between the effects of a 70% DMSO solution and a 5% DMSO placebo solution.6 Certain precautions must be taken when applying DMSO, and it should only be used under the guidance of a qualified healthcare professional.

References

1. Kneer W, Kuhnau S, Bias P, et al. Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) gel in treatment of acute tendopathies. A multicenter, placebo-controlled, randomized study. Fortschritte Med 1994;112:142-6 [in German].

2. Lockie LM, Norcross BM. A clinical study on the effects of dimethyl sulfoxide in 103 patients with acute and chronic musculoskeletal injuries and inflammations. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1967;141:599-602.

3. Steinberg A. The employment of dimethyl sulfoxide as an antiinflammatory agent and steroid-transporter in diversified clinical diseases. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1967;141:532-50.

4. Brown JH, Wood DC, Jacob SW. Current status of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). A double blind evaluation of its therapeutic value in acute strains, sprains, bursitis and tendonitis. Bull Soc Int Chir 1972;31:561-6.

5. Brown JH. A double blind study-DMSO for acute injuries and inflammations compared to accepted standard therapy. Curr Ther Res Clin Exp 1971;13:536-40.

6. Percy EC, Carson JD. The use of DMSO in tennis elbow and rotator cuff tendonitis: a double-blind study. Med Sci Sports Exerc 1981;13:215-9.

Sprains and Strains
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The use of DMSO, a colorless, oily liquid primarily used as an industrial solvent, for therapeutic applications is controversial. However, some evidence indicates that dilutions, when applied directly to the skin, have anti-inflammatory properties and inhibit the transmission of pain messages by nerves, and in this way might ease the pain of minor injuries such as sprains and strains.1, 2, 3 However no controlled research exists to confirm these effects in sprains and strains. DMSO comes in different strengths and different degrees of purity. In addition, certain precautions must be taken when applying DMSO. For those reasons, DMSO should be used only with the supervision of a doctor.

References

1. Swanson BN. Medical use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Rev Clin Basic Pharmacol 1985;5:1-33 [review].

2. American Medical Association. Dimethyl sulfoxide. Controversy and Current Status-1981. JAMA 1982;248:1369-71 [review].

3. Jacob SW, Wood DC. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical experience. Am J Surg 1967;114:414-26.

Osteoarthritis
Dose: Apply a gel containing 25% DMSO under the direction of a qualified healthcare practitionerThe therapeutic use of DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) is controversial because of safety concerns, but some preliminary research shows that diluted preparations of DMSO, applied directly to the skin, are anti-inflammatory and alleviate pain, including pain associated with osteoarthritis.1, 2 A recent double-blind trial found that a 25% concentration of DMSO in gel form relieved osteoarthritis pain significantly better than a placebo after three weeks.3 DMSO appears to reduce pain by inhibiting the transmission of pain messages by nerves4 rather than through a process of healing damaged joints. DMSO comes in different strengths and different degrees of purity; in addition, certain precautions must be taken when applying DMSO. For these reasons, DMSO should be used only with the supervision of a doctor.
References

1. American Medical Association. Dimethyl sulfoxide. Controversy and Current Status-1981. JAMA 1982;248:1369-71 [review].

2. Jimenez RAH, Willkens RF. Dimethyl sulfoxide: A perspective of its use in rheumatic diseases. J Lab Clin Med 1982;100:489-500.

3. Eberhardt R, Zwingers T, Hofmann R. DMSO in patients with active gonarthrosis. A double-blind placebo controlled phase III study. Fortschr Med 1995;113:446-50 [in German].

4. Jacob SW, Wood DC. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical experience. Am J Surg 114:414-26.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

The use of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) for therapeutic applications is controversial in part because some claims made by advocates appear to extend beyond current scientific evidence, and in part because topical use greatly increases the absorption of any substance that happens to be on the skin, including molecules that are toxic to the body. Nonetheless, there is some preliminary evidence that when applied to the skin, it has anti-inflammatory properties and alleviates pain, such as that associated with RA.1, 2 DMSO appears to reduce pain by inhibiting the transmission of pain messages by nerves.3 It comes in different strengths and degrees of purity, and certain precautions must be taken when applying DMSO. For these reasons, DMSO should be used only under the supervision of a doctor.

References

1. American Medical Association. Dimethyl sulfoxide. Controversy and Current Status-1981. JAMA 1982;248:1369-71 [review].

2. Jimenez RAH, Willkens RF. Dimethyl sulfoxide: A perspective of its use in rheumatic diseases. J Lab Clin Med 1982;100:489-500.

3. Jacob SW, Wood DC. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical experience. Am J Surg 1967;114:414-26.

Dupuytren's Contracture
Dose: Refer to label instructions

DMSO applied to the affected area may reduce pain by inhibiting transmission of pain messages, and may also soften the abnormal connective tissue associated with disorders such as Dupuytren's contracture, keloids, Peyronie's disease, and scleroderma. Research on the use of topical DMSO to treat Dupuytren's contracture remains preliminary and unproven.1

References

1. Jacob SW, Wood DC. Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Toxicology, pharmacology, and clinical experience. Am J Surg 1967;114:414-26.

Peptic Ulcer
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Oral supplementation with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) reduced relapse rates for peptic ulcer significantly better than did placebo or the ulcer drug cimetidine (Tagamet) in one study.1 Previous research showed that DMSO in combination with cimetidine was more effective than cimetidine alone.2 These trials used 500 mg of DMSO taken four times per day. The authors of these trials believe the antioxidant activity of DMSO may have a protective effect. Oral supplementation with DMSO should not be attempted without the supervision of a doctor.

References

1. Salim AS. The relationship between Helicobacter pylori and oxygen-derived free radicals in the mechanism of duodenal ulceration. Internal Med 1993;32:359-64.

2. Salim AS. Allopurinol and dimethyl sulfoxide improve treatment outcomes in smokers with peptic ulcer disease. J Lab Clin Med 1992;119:702-9.

Peyronie's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

DMSO (dimethyl sulfoxide) is a colorless, slightly oily liquid that is primarily used as an industrial solvent.

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.