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Nature's Way® Ginger Root

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Premium Herbal
SOOTHES DIGESTION*



Health & longevity through the healing power of nature - that's what it means to Trust the Leaf.®



Did you know) Nature's Way Ginger contains the aromatic essential oils
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

Take 2 capsules two to four times daily, or as needed for stomach discomfort.

Serving Size 2 Capsules
Servings Per Container 50
Amount Per Serving % DV
Calories 5.00
Total Carbohydrate 1.00 g 0%
Ginger (root) 1.10 g **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Gelatin (capsule)

Warning: Freshness & safety sealed with printed outer shrinkwrap and printed inner seal. Do not use if either seal is broken or missing. Keep out of reach of children.

Consult a health care provider prior to use if you have gallstones.

Do not use if pregnant or lactating.

Nature's Way Products, Inc.
Springville, Utah 84663 USA

Health Notes

Ginger

Ginger
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Morning Sickness
Dose: 1 gram powder daily
Ginger, well-known for alleviating nausea and improving digestion, appears to be an effective and safe treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.(more)
Motion Sickness
Dose: Adults: 500 mg one hour before travel and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary; children: 250 mg (half dose)
Ginger may help prevent and treat mild to moderate cases of motion sickness. Studies have shown it to be as effective as dimenhydrinate (Dramamine) but with fewer side effects.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: 2 to 4 grams daily fresh ginger or equivalent for indigestion
Ginger, with its anti-inflammatory and anti-nausea effects, has a history of use in treating gastrointestinal complaints, from flatulence to ulcers. It has been shown to enhance intestinal movements that aid digestion.(more)
Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Dose: Take a Chinese herbal formula containing wormwood under the guidance of a qualified practitioner
A standardized Chinese herbal combination containing extracts from plants including wormwood, ginger, bupleurum, schisandra, and dan shen reduced IBS symptoms in one study.(more)
Osteoarthritis
Dose: 510 mg daily of a concentrated herbal extract, taken in divided doses
Ginger has historically been used for arthritis and rheumatism. Studies have shown it to be effective at relieving pain and swelling in people with osteoarthritis.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Herbalists often use ginger to decrease inflammation and the pain associated with it, including for those with low back pain.(more)
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Ginger is an Ayurvedic herb used to treat people with arthritis. Taking fresh or powdered ginger may reduce the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.(more)
Migraine Headache
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Anecdotal evidence suggests ginger may be used for migraines and the accompanying nausea.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Herbalists often use ginger to decrease inflammation and the pain associated with it, including for those with low back pain.(more)
Dysmenorrhea
Dose: 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days
In a double-blind trial, ginger powder was as effective as anti-inflammatory medication (mefenamic acid and ibuprofen) in relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea. (more)
Dysmenorrhea
Dose: 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days
In a double-blind trial, ginger powder was as effective as anti-inflammatory medication (mefenamic acid and ibuprofen) in relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea. (more)
Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Dose: 1 gram of powder in a capsule 60 minutes before receiving general anesthesia (inform your anesthesiologist)
Ginger has antinausea properties and may prevent postoperative nausea and vomiting.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The herbal formula sho-saiko-to has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells in people infected with HIV.(more)
Vertigo
Dose: 1 gram of powdered root daily
Ginger has been shown to be effective at reducing symptoms.(more)
Atherosclerosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Supplementing with ginger may reduce platelet stickiness.(more)
Hay Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptoms, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.(more)
Morning Sickness
Dose: 1 gram powder daily

Ginger is well-known for alleviating nausea and improving digestion. One gram of encapsulated ginger powder was used in one study to reduce the severe nausea and vomiting associated with hyperemesis gravidarum.1 This condition is potentially life-threatening and should only be treated by a qualified healthcare professional. A review of six double-blind trials concluded that ginger is probably an effective treatment for nausea and vomiting in pregnancy.2

Because ginger contains some compounds that cause chromosomal mutation in the test tube, some doctors are concerned about the safety of using ginger during pregnancy. However, the available clinical research, combined with the fact that ginger is widely used in the diets of many cultures, suggests that prudent use of ginger for morning sickness is probably safe in amounts up to 1 gram per day.3

References

1. Fischer-Rasmussen W, Kjaer SK, Dahl C, Asping U. Ginger treatment of hyperemesis gravidarum. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1991;38:19-24.

2. Borrelli F, Capasso R, Aviello G, et al. Effectiveness and safety of ginger in the treatment of pregnancy-induced nausea and vomiting. Obstet Gynecol 2005;105:849-56.

3. Fulder S, Tenne M. Ginger as an anti-nausea remedy in pregnancy and the issue of safety. HerbalGram 1996;38:47-50.

Motion Sickness
Dose: Adults: 500 mg one hour before travel and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary; children: 250 mg (half dose)

Ginger may be useful for the prevention and treatment of mild to moderate cases of motion sickness. A double-blind trial examined the effects of ginger supplements in people who were susceptible to motion sickness. Researchers found that those taking 940 mg of powdered ginger in capsules experienced less motion sickness than those who took dimenhydrinate (Dramamine).1 Another double-blind trial reported that 1 gram of powdered ginger root, compared with placebo, lessened seasickness by 38% and vomiting by 72% in a group of naval cadets sailing in heavy seas.2 Two clinical trials, one with adults and one with children, found that ginger was as effective in treating seasickness as dimenhydrinate but with fewer side effects.3, 4 In one controlled trial, though, neither powdered ginger (500 to 1,000 mg) nor fresh ginger (1,000 mg) provided any protection against motion sickness.5 Doctors prescribing ginger for motion sickness recommend 500 mg one hour before travel and then 500 mg every two to four hours as necessary. The study with children used one-half the adult amount.

Ginger's beneficial effect on motion sickness appears to be related to its action on the gastrointestinal tract rather than on the central nervous system.6, 7

References

1. Mowrey DB, Clayson DE. Motion sickness, ginger, and psychophysics. Lancet 1982;1:655-7.

2. Grontved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, Hentzer E. Ginger root against sea sickness. A controlled trial in the open sea. Acta Otolarygol 1988;105:45-9.

3. Ribenfeld D, Borzone L. Randomized double-blind study comparing ginger (Zintona(R)) with dimenhydrinate in motion sickness. Healthnotes Rev Complementary Integrative Med 1999;6:98-101.

4. Careddu P. Motion sickness in children: results of a double-blind study with ginger (Zintona(R)) and dimenhydrinate. Healthnotes Rev Complementary Integrative Med 1999;6:102-7.

5. Stewart JJ, Wood MJ, Wood CD, Mims ME. Effects of ginger on motion sickness susceptibility and gastric function. Pharmacology 1991;42:111-20.

6. Holtmann S, Clarke AH, Scherer H, Hohn M. The anti-motion sickness mechanism of ginger. A comparative study with placebo and dimenhydrinate. Acta Otolaryngol (Stockh) 1989;108:168-74.

7. Grontved A, Hentzer E. Vertigo-reducing effect of ginger root. A controlled clinical study. ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec 1986;48:282-6.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: 2 to 4 grams daily fresh ginger or equivalent for indigestion

Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.1

There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise, Basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, dill, ginger, oregano, rosemary, sage, lavender, and thyme.2 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.3 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4-6 grams of sage leaf.4 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

Demulcents herbs may be used to treat indigestion and heartburn. These herbs seem to work by decreasing inflammation and forming a physical barrier against stomach acid or other abdominal irritants. Examples of demulcent herbs include ginger, licorice, and slippery elm.

Ginger is a spice well known for its traditional use as a treatment for a variety of gastrointestinal complaints, ranging from flatulence to ulcers. Ginger has anti-inflammatory and anti-nausea properties. Ginger has been shown to enhance normal, spontaneous movements of the intestines that aid digestion.5

References

1. Forster HB, Niklas H, Lutz S. Antispasmodic effects of some medicinal plants. Planta Med 1980;40:303-19.

2. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 425-6.

3. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 185-6.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 198.

5. Micklefield GH, Redeker Y, Meister V, et al. Effects of ginger on gastroduodenal motility. Int J Clin Pharmacol Ther 1999;37:341-6.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
Dose: Take a Chinese herbal formula containing wormwood under the guidance of a qualified practitioner

Whole peppermint leaf is often used either alone or in combination with other herbs to treat abdominal discomfort and mild cramping that accompany IBS. The combination of peppermint, caraway seeds, fennel seeds, and wormwood was reported to be an effective treatment for upper abdominal complaints in a double-blind trial.1

References

1. Westphal J, Horning M, Leonhardt K. Phytotherapy in functional upper abdominal complaints. Results of a clinical study with a preparation of several plants. Phytomedicine 1996;2:285-91.

Osteoarthritis
Dose: 510 mg daily of a concentrated herbal extract, taken in divided dosesGinger has historically been used for arthritis and rheumatism. A preliminary trial reported relief in pain and swelling among people with arthritis who used powdered ginger supplements1 More recently, a double-blind trial found ginger extract (170 mg three times a day for three weeks) to be slightly more effective than placebo at relieving pain in people with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee.2 In another double-blind study, a concentrated extract of ginger, taken in the amount of 255 mg twice daily for six weeks, was significantly more effective than a placebo, as determined by the degree of pain relief and overall improvement.3
References

1. Srivastava KC, Mustafa T. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in rheumatism and musculoskeletal disorders. Med Hypoth 1992;39:342-8.

2. Bliddal H, Rosetzsky A, Schlichting P, et al. A randomized, placebo-controlled crossover study of ginger extracts and ibuprofen in osteoarthritis. Osteoarthritis Cartilage 2000;8:9-12.

3. Altman RD, Marcussen KC. Effects of a ginger extract on knee pain in patients with osteoarthritis. Arthritis Rheum 2001;44:2531-8.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbalists often use ginger to decrease inflammation and the pain associated with it, including for those with low back pain. They typically suggest 1.5 to 3 ml of ginger tincture three times per day, or 2 to 4 grams of the dried root powder two to three times per day. Some products contain a combination of curcumin and ginger. However, no research has investigated the effects of these herbs on low back pain.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Ginger is another Ayurvedic herb used to treat people with arthritis. A small number of case studies suggest that taking 6-50 grams of fresh or powdered ginger per day may reduce the symptoms of RA.1 A combination formula containing ginger, turmeric, boswellia, and ashwagandha has been shown in a double-blind trial to be slightly more effective than placebo for RA;2 the amounts of herbs used in this trial are not provided by the investigators.

References

1. Srivastava KC, Mustafa T. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) in rheumatism and musculoskeletal disorders. Med Hypoth 1992;39:342-8.

2. Chopra A, Lavin P, Patwardhan B, Chitre D. Randomized double blind trial of an Ayurvedic plant derived formulation for treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. J Rheumatol 2000;27:1365-72.

Migraine Headache
Dose: Refer to label instructionsAnecdotal evidence suggests ginger may be used for migraines and the accompanying nausea. In a double-blind study, a sublingual preparation that contained both feverfew and ginger LipiGesic M (PuraMed BioScience, Inc., Schofield, WI) appeared to be beneficial for acute migraines.1
References

1. Cady RK, Goldstein J, Nett R, et al. A double-blind placebo-controlled pilot study of sublingual feverfew and ginger (LipiGesic M) in the treatment of migraine. Headache 2011;51:1078-86

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbalists often use ginger to decrease inflammation and the pain associated with it, including for those with low back pain. They typically suggest 1.5 to 3 ml of ginger tincture three times per day, or 2 to 4 grams of the dried root powder two to three times per day. Some products contain a combination of curcumin and ginger. However, no research has investigated the effects of these herbs on low back pain.

Dysmenorrhea
Dose: 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days

Ginger has been used in some systems of traditional medicine to treat dysmenorrhea. In a double-blind trial, ginger powder was as effective as anti-inflammatory medication (mefenamic acid and ibuprofen) in relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Ginger was used in the amount of 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days.1

References

1. Ozgoli G, Goli M, Moattar F. Comparison of effects of ginger, mefenamic acid, and ibuprofen on pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea. J Altern Complement Med 2009;15:129-32.

Dysmenorrhea
Dose: 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days

Ginger has been used in some systems of traditional medicine to treat dysmenorrhea. In a double-blind trial, ginger powder was as effective as anti-inflammatory medication (mefenamic acid and ibuprofen) in relieving symptoms of dysmenorrhea. Ginger was used in the amount of 250 mg four times per day, beginning at the start of menstruation and continuing for three days.1

References

1. Ozgoli G, Goli M, Moattar F. Comparison of effects of ginger, mefenamic acid, and ibuprofen on pain in women with primary dysmenorrhea. J Altern Complement Med 2009;15:129-32.

Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Dose: 1 gram of powder in a capsule 60 minutes before receiving general anesthesia (inform your anesthesiologist)

A recent study found that 24% of surgery patients had taken herbal supplements before their surgeries, and 50 different herbs had been used among these patients.1 Little research exists, however, on the safety or efficacy of herbs before surgery. Some researchers and healthcare providers are concerned about possible harmful interactions between herbs and medications used around or during surgery, or the possibility that some herbs may increase bleeding during and after surgery.2, 3 The use of herbs around the time of surgery should be discussed with a knowledgeable healthcare practitioner.

Nausea and vomiting can be experienced post-operatively as a result of anesthesia. Ginger(Zingiber officinale) has antinausea properties and has been examined for its ability to prevent post-operative nausea and vomiting in several controlled trials. In two of these controlled trials, ginger was found more effective than placebo and equal to an antinausea medication;4, 5 however, in two other controlled trials ginger was not found to have any benefit.6, 7 A review considering the results of these trials concluded that 1 gram of ginger taken before surgery prevents nausea and vomiting slightly better than placebo, but this difference is not significant.8 However, a more recent review concluded that ginger is an effective means for reducing postoperative nausea and vomiting.9

References

1. Norred CL, Zamudio S, Palmer SK. Use of complementary and alternative medicines by surgical patients. AANA J 2000;68:13-8.

2. Murphy JM. Preoperative considerations with herbal medicines. AORN J 1999;69:173-5, 177-8, 180-3.

3. Robb-Nicholson C. By the way, doctor. My surgeon advised me to stop taking gingko biloba before my hip surgery. Can you explain why? Are there any other herbs I should avoid? Harv Womens Health Watch 2000;7:8.

4. Phillips S, Ruggier R, Hutchinson SE. Zingiber officinale (ginger)-an antiemetic for day case surgery. Anaesthesia 1993;48:715-7.

5. Bone ME, Wilkinson DJ, Young JR, et al. Ginger root-a new antiemetic. The effect of ginger root on the postoperative nausea and vomiting after major gynaecological surgery. Anaesthesia 1990;45:669-71.

6. Visalyaputra S, Petchpaisit N, Somcharoen K, Choavaratana R. The efficacy of ginger root in the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting after outpatient gynaecological laparoscopy. Anaesthesia 1998;53:506-10.

7. Arfeen Z, Owen H, Plummer JL, et al. A double-blind randomized controlled trial of ginger for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting. Anaesth Intensive Care 1995;23:449-52.

8. Ernst E, Pittler MH. Efficacy of ginger for nausea and vomiting: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials. Br J Anaesth 2000;84:367-71 [review].

9. Chaiyakunapruk N, Kitikannakorn N, Nathisuwan S, et al. The efficacy of ginger for the prevention of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a meta-analysis. Am J Obstet Gynecol2006;194:95-9.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The Chinese herb bupleurum, as part of the herbal formula sho-saiko-to, has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells taken from people infected with HIV.1 Sho-saiko-to has also been shown to improve the efficacy of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine in the test tube.2 One preliminary study found that 7 of 13 people with HIV given sho-saiko-to had improvements in immune function.3 Double-blind trials are needed to determine whether bupleurum or sho-saiko-to might benefit people with HIV infection or AIDS. Other herbs in sho-saiko-to have also been shown to have anti-HIV activity in the test tube, most notably Asian scullcap.4 Therefore studies on sho-saiko-to cannot be taken to mean that bupleurum is the only active herb involved. The other ingredients are peony root, pinellia root, cassia bark, ginger root, jujube fruit, Asian ginseng root, Asian scullcap root, and licorice root.

References

1. Inada Y, Watanabe K, Kamiyama M, et al. In vitro immunomodulatory effects of traditional Kampo medicine (sho-saiko-to: SST) on peripheral mononuclear cells in patients with AIDS. Biomed Pharmacother 1990;44:17-9.

2. Piras G, Makino M, Baba M. Sho-saiko-to, a traditional kampo medicine, enhances the anti-HIV-1 activity of lamivudine (3TC) in vitro. Microbiol Immunol 1997;41:835-9.

3. Fujimaki M, Hada M, Ikematsu S, et al. Clinical efficacy of two kinds of kampo medicine on HIV infected patients. Int Conf AIDS 1989;5:400 [abstract no. W.B.P.292].

4. Li BQ, Fu T, Yan YD, et al. Inhibition of HIV infection by baicalin-a flavonoid compound purified from Chinese herbal medicine. Cell Mol Biol Res 1993;39:119-24.

Vertigo
Dose: 1 gram of powdered root daily

One gram of powdered ginger(Zingiber officinale) root in a single application has been reported to significantly reduce symptoms of artificially induced vertigo in one double-blind trial.1 In a double-blind trial, 1 gram of powdered ginger root was found to have very little effect in reducing vertigo related to seasickness.2

References

1. Grontved A, Hentzer E. Vertigo-reducing effect of ginger root. A controlled clinical study. ORL J Otorhinolaryngol Relat Spec 1986;48:282-6.

2. Grontved A, Brask T, Kambskard J, Hentzer E. Ginger root against sea sickness. A controlled trial in the open sea. Acta Otolarygol 1988;105:45-9.

Atherosclerosis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The research on ginger's ability to reduce platelet stickiness indicates that 10 grams (approximately 1 heaping teaspoon) per day is the minimum necessary amount to be effective.1 Lower amounts of dry ginger,2 as well as various levels of fresh ginger,3 have not been shown to affect platelets.

References

1. Bordia A, Verma SK, Srivastava KC. Effect of ginger (Zingiber officinale Rosc) and fenugreek (Trigonella foenumgraceum L) on blood lipids, blood sugar, and platelet aggregation in patients with coronary artery disease. Prostagland Leukotrienes Essential Fatty Acids 1997;56:379-84.

2. Lumb AB. Effect of dried ginger on human platelet function. Thromb Haemost 1994;7:110-1.

3. Janssen PL, Meyboom S, van Staveren WA, et al. Consumption of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) does not affect ex vivo platelet thromboxane production in humans. Eur J Clin Nutr 1996;50:772-4.

Hay Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The Japanese herbal formula known as sho-seiryu-to has been shown to reduce symptom, such as sneezing, for people with hay fever.1 Sho-seiryu-to contains licorice, cassia bark, schisandra, ma huang, ginger, peony root, pinellia, and asiasarum root.

References

1. Baba S, Takasaka T. Double-blind clinical trial of sho-seiryu-to (TJ-19) for perennial nasal allergy. Clin Otolaryngol 1995;88:389-405.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Ginger is a perennial plant that grows in India, China, Mexico, and several other countries. The rhizome (underground stem) is used as both a spice and in herbal medicine.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
NATURES WAYNature's Way® Ginger Root
 
3.7

(based on 3 reviews)

Reviewed by 3 customers

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(4 of 14 customers found this review helpful)

 
1.0

What product

By rtijg

from Tampa, FL

See all my reviews

Comments about NATURES WAY Nature's Way® Ginger Root:

I ordered this product locally 9/30/13 and I was assured it would be delivered timely. THE PACKAGE arrived 10/8/13 by USPS and the package was OPEN and empty. I called the in store order hot line gave the order# and RIP #. They could not verify my order ALTHOUGH my address and CC were correct.
The name on the package is not mine CO)RRECTLY but the4 phone # and address are correct.

(10 of 10 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

I Now Take Two Capsules A Day

By ettari

from Shrub Oak, New York

About Me Health Conscious

See all my reviews

Pros

  • Effective
  • Good Value
  • Long Lasting

Cons

  • Side Effects

Best Uses

  • Daily Use
  • Good Supplement
  • Preventative
  • Recovery

Comments about NATURES WAY Nature's Way® Ginger Root:

A friend informed me that she had eliminated her back pains by grinding ginger root into a powder and making a ginger tea. Having no time for such a daily routine, I checked with GNC and found this product. I purchased a bottle and started to take two capsules every day. Within 5 days, I had no more pain in my right knee (my left knee worked and had little pain). I did discontinue use for several days while on a business trip - and the pain came back quickly. Once I returned home and started to take these pills again, the knee pain disappeared within several days. Now, I am no longer contemplating knee surgery.

(5 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

 
5.0

good stuff

By williamrodriguez2112

from Chicago,IL.

About Me First Time User

See all my reviews

Verified Buyer

Pros

  • Effective
  • Good Taste
  • Good Value
  • Long Lasting
  • No Side Effects

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Good Alternative
    • Good Supplement
    • Preventative
    • Recovery

    Comments about NATURES WAY Nature's Way® Ginger Root:

    still in process,so far,so good

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