Product Images
Nature's Way® Korean Ginseng Root 510 mg - SCHWABE - GNC Zoom
Product Videos

Nature's Way® Korean Ginseng Root 510 mg

Shop all Nature's Way

60 Vcaps

Item #296051 See Product Details

Price: $17.99

Member Price: $14.39 Become a Member

Availability: In Stock Details

Available Promotions:

  • Not Eligible for 30% Off Discount. Details
  • $3.99 Flat Rate Shipping! Details

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $17.99

Member Price: $14.39 Become a Member
Ship every:
Add to Cart
People Who Buy This Also Bought
You May Also Be Interested In
More Sizes Available
Description
Premium Herbal - Vitality Herb

Korean Ginseng (Panax ginseng) is a traditional Chinese herb for vitality, and is popular among individuals leading an active lifestyle. Guaranteed to contain 2% ginsenosides.

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Freshness & safety sealed with printed outer shrinkwrap and printed inner seal. Do not use if either seal is broken or missing.

Health & longevity through the healing power of nature - that's what it means to Trust the Leaf.®

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

Take 2 capsules daily preferably with food.

Serving Size 1 Capsules
Servings Per Container 60
Amount Per Serving % DV
Korean Ginseng (root) 7% ginsenosides 550.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Plant-derived capsule, Millet, Magnesium Stearate

Warning: Not recommended for pregnant or lactating women. If you have high blood pressure, consult your healthcare professional before taking Korean Ginseng.

© 2007 R/O Nature's Way Products, Inc. Springville, Utah 84663 USA

Health Notes

Asian Ginseng

Asian Ginseng
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Erectile Dysfunction
Dose: 900 mg of a concentrated herbal extract two or three times daily
Asian ginseng may improve libido and ability to maintain erection.(more)
Male Infertility
Dose: 4 grams daily
One preliminary study found that men who took Asian ginseng had an improvement in sperm count and sperm motility.(more)
Erectile Dysfunction
Dose: 900 mg of a concentrated herbal extract two or three times daily
Asian ginseng may improve libido and ability to maintain erection.(more)
Immune Function
Dose: 100 mg of a standardized extract twice per day
Asian ginseng has a long history of use in traditional herbal medicine for preventing and treating conditions related to the immune system.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Adaptogens such as Asian ginseng are thought to help keep various body systems-including the immune system-functioning optimally.(more)
Influenza
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Asian ginseng has immune-enhancing properties, which may play a role in preventing infection with the influenza virus.(more)
Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Asian ginseng supports the immune system and protects against microbes.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
One study found that steamed then dried Asian ginseng had beneficial effects in people infected with HIV and increased the effectiveness of the anti-HIV drug AZT.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The herbal formula sho-saiko-to has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells in people infected with HIV.(more)
Stress
Dose: Take an extract supplying at least 1.6 mg daily of ginsenosides, along with a multivitamin
Supplementing with Asian ginseng has been shown to enhance feelings of well-being and improve quality of life in some studies.(more)
Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: 200 mg of herbal extract containing approximately 5 to 7% ginsenosides daily
Asian ginseng is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat diabetes.(more)
Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Asian ginseng is commonly used in traditional Chinese medicine to treat diabetes.(more)
Menopause
Dose: 200 mg per day of standardized extract
One trial found that Asian ginseng helped alleviate psychological symptoms of menopause, such as depression and anxiety.(more)
Menopause
Dose: 200 mg per day of standardized extract
One trial found that Asian ginseng helped alleviate psychological symptoms of menopause, such as depression and anxiety.(more)
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Adaptogenic herbs such as Asian ginseng have an immunomodulating effect and help support the normal function of the body's hormonal stress system.(more)
Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: 4.5 grams per day for 12 weeks
A preliminary trial suggests that taking Panax ginseng may significantly improve a measure of cognitive function in the short term, though long-term use has not been established.(more)
Athletic Performance, Endurance Exercise, and Muscle Strength
Dose: 2 grams of powdered root daily or 200 to 400 mg daily of an herbal extract standardized for 4% ginsenosides
Some early studies suggested there might be benefits of using Asian ginseng to improve athletic performance. One study reported increased pectoral and quadricep muscle strength in non-exercising men and women after supplementing with the herb.(more)
Mental Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructions
(more)
Erectile Dysfunction
Dose: 900 mg of a concentrated herbal extract two or three times daily

Asian ginseng(Panax ginseng) has traditionally been used as a supportive herb for male potency. A double-blind trial found that 1,800 mg per day of Asian ginseng extract for three months helped improve libido and the ability to maintain an erection in men with ED.1 The benefit of Asian ginseng confirmed in another double-blind study, in which 900 mg three times a day was given for eight weeks.2

References

1. Choi HK, Seong DH, Rha KH. Clinical efficacy of Korean red ginseng for erectile dysfunction. Int J Impotence Res 1995;7:181-6.

2. Hong B, Ji YH, Hong JH, et al. A double-blind crossover study evaluating the efficacy of Korean red ginseng in patients with erectile dysfunction: a preliminary report. J Urol 2002;168:2070-3.

Male Infertility
Dose: 4 grams daily

Asian ginseng may prove useful for male infertility. One preliminary study found that 4 grams of Asian ginseng per day for three months led to an improvement in sperm count and sperm motility.1

References

1. Salvati G, Genovesi G, Marcellini L, et al. Effects of Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer saponins on male fertility. Panmineva Med 1996;38:249-54.

Erectile Dysfunction
Dose: 900 mg of a concentrated herbal extract two or three times daily

Asian ginseng(Panax ginseng) has traditionally been used as a supportive herb for male potency. A double-blind trial found that 1,800 mg per day of Asian ginseng extract for three months helped improve libido and the ability to maintain an erection in men with ED.1 The benefit of Asian ginseng confirmed in another double-blind study, in which 900 mg three times a day was given for eight weeks.2

References

1. Choi HK, Seong DH, Rha KH. Clinical efficacy of Korean red ginseng for erectile dysfunction. Int J Impotence Res 1995;7:181-6.

2. Hong B, Ji YH, Hong JH, et al. A double-blind crossover study evaluating the efficacy of Korean red ginseng in patients with erectile dysfunction: a preliminary report. J Urol 2002;168:2070-3.

Immune Function
Dose: 100 mg of a standardized extract twice per dayAsian ginseng has a long history of use in traditional herbal medicine for preventing and treating conditions related to the immune system. A double-blind study of healthy people found that taking 100 mg of a standardized extract of Asian ginseng twice per day improved immune function.1
References

1. Scaglione F, Ferrara F, Dugnani S, et al. Immunomodulatory effects of two extracts of Panax ginseng CA Meyer. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1990;16:537-42.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbal supplements can help strengthen the immune system and fight infections. Adaptogens, which include eleuthero, Asian ginseng, astragalus, and schisandra, are thought to help keep various body systems-including the immune system-functioning optimally. They have not been systematically evaluated as cold remedies. However, one double-blind trial found that people who were given 100 mg of Asian ginseng extract in combination with a flu vaccine experienced a lower frequency of colds and flu compared with people who received only the flu vaccine.1

References

1. Scaglione F, Cattaneo G, Alessandria M, Cogo R. Efficacy and safety of the standardized ginseng extract G 115 for potentiating vaccination against common cold and/or influenza syndrome. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1996;22:65-72.

Influenza
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Asian ginseng and eleuthero (Siberian ginseng) have immune-enhancing properties, which may play a role in preventing infection with the influenza virus. However, they have not yet been specifically studied for this purpose. One double-blind trial found that co-administration of 100 mg of Asian ginseng extract with a flu vaccine led to a lower frequency of colds and flu compared to people who just received the flu vaccine alone.1

References

1. Scaglione F, Cattaneo G, Alessandria M, Cogo R. Efficacy and safety of the standardized ginseng extract G 115 for potentiating vaccination against common cold and/or influenza syndrome. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1996;22:65-72.

Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbs that support a person's immune system in the fight against microbes include the following: American ginseng, andrographis, Asian ginseng, astragalus, coriolus, eleuthero, ligustrum, maitake, picrorhiza, reishi, schisandra, and shiitake.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Immune-modulating plants that could theoretically be beneficial for people with HIV infection include Asian ginseng, eleuthero, and the medicinal mushrooms shiitake and reishi. One preliminary study found that steamed then dried Asian ginseng (also known as red ginseng) had beneficial effects in people infected with HIV, and increased the effectiveness of the anti-HIV drug, AZT.1 This supports the idea that immuno-modulating herbs could benefit people with HIV infection, though more research is needed.

References

1. Cho YK, Kim Y, Choi M, et al. The effect of red ginseng and zidovudine on HIV patients. Int Conf AIDS 1994;10:215 [abstract no. PB0289].

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The Chinese herb bupleurum, as part of the herbal formula sho-saiko-to, has been shown to have beneficial immune effects on white blood cells taken from people infected with HIV.1 Sho-saiko-to has also been shown to improve the efficacy of the anti-HIV drug lamivudine in the test tube.2 One preliminary study found that 7 of 13 people with HIV given sho-saiko-to had improvements in immune function.3 Double-blind trials are needed to determine whether bupleurum or sho-saiko-to might benefit people with HIV infection or AIDS. Other herbs in sho-saiko-to have also been shown to have anti-HIV activity in the test tube, most notably Asian scullcap.4 Therefore studies on sho-saiko-to cannot be taken to mean that bupleurum is the only active herb involved. The other ingredients are peony root, pinellia root, cassia bark, ginger root, jujube fruit, Asian ginseng root, Asian scullcap root, and licorice root.

References

1. Inada Y, Watanabe K, Kamiyama M, et al. In vitro immunomodulatory effects of traditional Kampo medicine (sho-saiko-to: SST) on peripheral mononuclear cells in patients with AIDS. Biomed Pharmacother 1990;44:17-9.

2. Piras G, Makino M, Baba M. Sho-saiko-to, a traditional kampo medicine, enhances the anti-HIV-1 activity of lamivudine (3TC) in vitro. Microbiol Immunol 1997;41:835-9.

3. Fujimaki M, Hada M, Ikematsu S, et al. Clinical efficacy of two kinds of kampo medicine on HIV infected patients. Int Conf AIDS 1989;5:400 [abstract no. W.B.P.292].

4. Li BQ, Fu T, Yan YD, et al. Inhibition of HIV infection by baicalin-a flavonoid compound purified from Chinese herbal medicine. Cell Mol Biol Res 1993;39:119-24.

Stress
Dose: Take an extract supplying at least 1.6 mg daily of ginsenosides, along with a multivitamin

The herbs discussed here are considered members of a controversial category known as adaptogens, which are thought to increase the body's resistance to stress, and to generally enhance physical and mental functioning.1, 2 Many animal studies have shown that various herbal adaptogens have protective effects against physically stressful experiences,3, 4 but whether these findings are relevant to human stress experiences is debatable.

Animal studies support the idea that Asian ginseng is an adaptogen.5 Some studies have suggested that Asian ginseng can enhance feelings of well-being in elderly people with age-associated memory impairment,6 nurses working night shifts,7 or people with diabetes.8 In a double-blind trial, people taking a daily combination of a multivitamin-mineral supplement (MVM) with 40 mg of ginseng extract (standardized for 4% ginsenosides) for 12 weeks reported greater improvements in quality of life measured with a questionnaire compared with a group taking only MVM.9 The same MVM-ginseng combination was tested in a double-blind study of night-shift healthcare workers.10 Compared with a placebo group, the group receiving the MVM-ginseng combination improved on one out of four measures of mental performance, one out of three measures of mood (increased calmness, but no change in alertness or contentment), and a measure of reported fatigue. However, in another double-blind study, healthy adults given 200 or 400 mg per day of a standardized extract of Asian ginseng (equivalent to 1,000 or 2,000 mg of ginseng root) showed no significant improvement in any of several measures of psychological well-being after two months.11

References

1. Brekhman II, Dardymov IV. New substances of plant origin which increase nonspecific resistance. Annu Rev Pharmacol 1969;9:419-30 [review].

2. Panossian A, Wikman G, Wagner H. Plant adaptogens. III. Earlier and more recent aspects and concepts on their mode of action. Phytomedicine 1999;6:287-300 [review].

3. Rege NN, Thatte UM, Dahanukar SA. Adaptogenic properties of six rasayana herbs used in Ayurvedic medicine. Phytother Res 1999;13:275-91 [review].

4. Wagner H, Norr H, Winterhoff H. Plant adaptogens. Phytomedicine 1994;1:63-76.

5. Schulz V, Hansel R, Tyler VE. Rational Phytotherapy: A Physicians' Guide to Herbal Medicine. 3rd ed. Berlin, Germany: Springer-Verlag; 1998:271-3.

6. Neri M, Andermarcher E, Pradelli JM, Salvioli G. Influence of a double blind pharmacological trial on two domains of well-being in subjects with age associated memory impairment. Arch Gerontol Geriatr 1995;21:241-52.

7. Hallstrom C, Fulder S, Carruthers M. Effect of ginseng on the performance of nurses on night duty. Comp Med East West 1982;6:277-82.

8. Sotaniemi EA, Haapakoski E, Rautio A. Ginseng therapy in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes Care 1995;18:1373-5.

9. Caso Mardsco A, Vargas Ruiz R, Salas Villagomez A, Begona Infante C. Double-blind study of a multivitamin complex supplemented with ginseng extract. Drugs Exp Clin Res 1996;22:323-9.

10. Wesnes KA, Luthringer R, Ambrosetti L, et al. The effects of a combination of Panax ginseng, vitamins and minerals on mental performance, mood and physical fatigue in nurses working night shifts: a double-blind, placebo controlled trial. Curr Top Nutraceut Res 2003;1:169-76.

11. Cardinal BJ, Engels HJ. Ginseng does not enhance psychological well-being in healthy, young adults: results of a double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized clinical trial. J Am Diet Assoc 2001;101:655-60.

Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: 200 mg of herbal extract containing approximately 5 to 7% ginsenosides dailyAsian ginseng is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat diabetes. It has been shown in test tube and animal studies to enhance the release of insulin from the pancreas and to increase the number of insulin receptors.1, 2 Animal research has also revealed a direct blood sugar-lowering effect of ginseng.3 A double-blind trial found that 200 mg of ginseng extract per day improved blood sugar control, as well as energy levels in people with type 2 diabetes.4
References

1. Zhang T, Hoshino M, Iguchi K, et al. Ginseng root: Evidence for numerous regulatory peptides and insulinotropic activity. Biomed Res 1990;11:49-54.

2. Suzuki Y, Hikino H. Mechanisms of hypoglycemic activity of panaxans A and B, glycans of Panax ginseng roots: Effects on plasma levels, secretion, sensitivity and binding of insulin in mice. Phytother Res 1989;3:20-4.

3. Waki I, Kyo H, Yasuda M, Kimura M. Effects of a hypoglycemic component of ginseng radix on insulin biosynthesis in normal and diabetic animals. J Pharm Dyn 1982;5:547-54.125.

4. Sotaniemi EA, Haapakoski E, Rautio A. Ginseng therapy in non-insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Diabetes Care 1995;18:1373-5.

Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructionsAsian ginseng is commonly used in Traditional Chinese Medicine to treat diabetes. It has been shown in test tube and animal studies to enhance the release of insulin from the pancreas and to increase the number of insulin receptors.1, 2 Animal research has also revealed a direct blood sugar-lowering effect of ginseng.3 However, no human trials have tested Asian ginseng in people with type 1 diabetes.
References

1. Zhang T, Hoshino M, Iguchi K, et al. Ginseng root: Evidence for numerous regulatory peptides and insulinotropic activity. Biomed Res 1990;11:49-54.

2. Suzuki Y, Hikino H. Mechanisms of hypoglycemic activity of panaxans A and B, glycans of Panax ginseng roots: Effects on plasma levels, secretion, sensitivity and binding of insulin in mice. Phytother Res 1989;3:20-4.

3. Waki I, Kyo H, Yasuda M, Kimura M. Effects of a hypoglycemic component of ginseng radix on insulin biosynthesis in normal and diabetic animals. J Pharm Dyn 1982;5:547-54.125.

Menopause
Dose: 200 mg per day of standardized extract

A double-blind trial found that Asian ginseng (200 mg per day of standardized extract) helped alleviate psychological symptoms of menopause, such as depression and anxiety, but did not decrease physical symptoms, such as hot flashes or sexual dysfunction, in postmenopausal women who had not been treated with hormones.1 In another double-blind trial, supplementation with 3 grams per day of red ginseng (heated Asian ginseng) for 12 weeks significantly improved menopausal hot flashes, compared with a placebo.2

References

1. Wiklund IK, Mattson LA, Lindgren R, et al. Effects of a standardized ginseng extract on quality of life and psychological parameters in symptomatic postmenopausal women: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Int J Clin Pharm Res 1999;19:89-99.

2. Kim SY, Seo SK, Choi YM, et al. Effects of red ginseng supplementation on menopausal symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women: a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Menopause 2012;19:461-6.

Menopause
Dose: 200 mg per day of standardized extract

A double-blind trial found that Asian ginseng (200 mg per day of standardized extract) helped alleviate psychological symptoms of menopause, such as depression and anxiety, but did not decrease physical symptoms, such as hot flashes or sexual dysfunction, in postmenopausal women who had not been treated with hormones.1 In another double-blind trial, supplementation with 3 grams per day of red ginseng (heated Asian ginseng) for 12 weeks significantly improved menopausal hot flashes, compared with a placebo.2

References

1. Wiklund IK, Mattson LA, Lindgren R, et al. Effects of a standardized ginseng extract on quality of life and psychological parameters in symptomatic postmenopausal women: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Int J Clin Pharm Res 1999;19:89-99.

2. Kim SY, Seo SK, Choi YM, et al. Effects of red ginseng supplementation on menopausal symptoms and cardiovascular risk factors in postmenopausal women: a double-blind randomized controlled trial. Menopause 2012;19:461-6.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Adaptogenic herbs such as Asian ginseng and eleuthero may also be useful for CFS patients-the herbs not only have an immunomodulating effect but also help support the normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, the hormonal stress system of the body.1 These herbs are useful follow-ups to the six to eight weeks of taking licorice root and may be used for long-term support of adrenal function in people with CFS. However, no controlled research has investigated the effect of adaptogenic herbs on CFS.

References

1. Brown D. Licorice root - potential early intervention for chronic fatigue syndrome. Quart Rev Natural Med 1996;Summer:95-7.

Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: 4.5 grams per day for 12 weeks In a preliminary trial, supplementation with 4.5 grams per day of Asian (Panax) ginseng for 12 weeks resulted in a statistically significant 15% improvement in a measure of cognitive function. This improvement waned after the treatment was discontinued.1
References

1. Lee ST, Chu K, Sim JY, et al. Panax ginseng enhances cognitive performance in Alzheimer disease. Alzheimer Dis Assoc Disord 2008;22:222-6.

Athletic Performance, Endurance Exercise, and Muscle Strength
Dose: 2 grams of powdered root daily or 200 to 400 mg daily of an herbal extract standardized for 4% ginsenosidesExtensive but often poorly designed studies have been conducted on the use of Asian ginseng (Panax ginseng) to improve athletic performance.1, 2 While some early controlled studies suggested there might be benefits, several recent double-blind trials have found no significant effects of Asian ginseng on endurance exercise.3, 4, 5 In many studies, it is possible that ginseng was used in insufficient amounts or for an inadequate length of time; a more effective regimen for enhancing endurance performance may be 2 grams of powdered root per day or 200 to 400 mg per day of an extract standardized for 4% ginsenosides, taken for eight to twelve weeks.6 Short-term intense exercise has also not been helped by Asian ginseng according to double-blind trials,7, 8 but one controlled study reported increased pectoral and quadricep muscle strength in non-exercising men and women after taking 1 gram per day of Asian ginseng for six weeks.9 An extract of a related plant, American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius), was found ineffective at improving endurance exercise performance in untrained people after one week's supplementation in a double-blind study.[REF]
References

1. Bahrke MS, Morgan WP. Evaluation of the ergogenic properties of ginseng. Sports Med 1994;18:229-48 [review].

2. Bahrke MS, Morgan WR. Evaluation of the ergogenic properties of ginseng: an update. Sports Med 2000;29:113-33 [review].

3. Engels HJ, Wirth JC. No ergogenic effects of ginseng (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) during graded maximal aerobic exercise. J Am Diet Assoc 1997;97:1110-5.

4. Allen JD, McLung J, Nelson AG, Welsch M. Ginseng supplementation does not enhance healthy young adults' peak aerobic exercise performance. J Am Coll Nutr 1998;17:462-6.

5. Bahrke MS, Morgan WR. Evaluation of the ergogenic properties of ginseng: an update. Sports Med 2000;29:113-33 [review].

6. Bucci LR. Selected herbals and human exercise performance. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;72:624S-36S [review].

7. Engels HJ, Fahlman MM, Wirth JC. Effects of ginseng on secretory IgA, performance, and recovery from interval exercise. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2003;35:690-6.

8. Engels HJ, Kolokouri I, Cieslak TJ 2nd, Wirth JC. Effects of ginseng supplementation on supramaximal exercise performance and short-term recovery. J Strength Cond Res 2001;15:290-5.

9. McNaughton L. A comparison of Chinese and Russian ginseng as ergogenic aids to improve various facets of physical fitness. Int Clin Nutr Rev 1989;9:32-5.

Mental Performance
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Parts Used & Where Grown

Asian ginseng is a member of the Araliaceae family, which also includes the closely related American ginseng(Panax quinquefolius) and less similar Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus), also known as eleuthero. Asian ginseng commonly grows on mountain slopes and is usually harvested in the fall. The root is used, preferably from plants older than six years of age.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

Ratings and Reviews
Ask A Question