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Nature's Way® White Willow Bark

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100 Capsules

Item #296121 See Product Details

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Description
Premium Herbal
CONTAINS SALICIN



Health & longevity through the healing power of nature - that's what it means to Trust the Leaf.®



White Willow Bark (Sarix alba) was the basis for the synthesis of aspirin. It contains salicin and related compounds.



Did you know? Nature's Way White Willow Bark is harvested from wild trees by a careful stripping process that does not hinder the growth of the tree.
SATISFACTION GUARANTEED.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

Take 2 capsules twice daily, preferably with food.

Serving Size 2 Capsules
Servings Per Container 50
Amount Per Serving % DV
Total Carbohydrate 1.00 g 1%
White Willow (bark) 800.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Gelatin (capsule)

Warning: Freshness & safety sealed with printed outer shrinkwrap and printed inner seal. Do not use if either seal is broken or missing. Keep out of reach of children.

Nature's Way Products, LLC
Green Bay, WI 54311 USA

Health Notes

Willow

Willow
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Low Back Pain
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin daily
Willow bark is traditionally used for pain and conditions of inflammation. According to one study, taking high amounts of willow bark extract may help people with low back pain.(more)
Osteoarthritis
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin per day
Willow has anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties. Although pain relief from willow supplementation may be slow in coming, it may last longer than pain relief from aspirin.(more)
Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Willow appears to be a long-lasting though slow-acting pain reliever. One trial found that willow bark combined with other herbs effectively relieved pain due to rheumatoid arthritis.(more)
Bursitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Some doctors recommend using the anti-inflammatory herbs boswellia, turmeric, willow, and topical cayenne ointment for bursitis. (more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin daily
Willow bark is traditionally used for pain and conditions of inflammation. According to one study, taking high amounts of willow bark extract may help people with low back pain.(more)
Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Willow bark has been used for centuries to decrease pain and inflammation. It appears to work by interfering with the process of inflammation and the pain-producing nerves in the spinal cord.(more)
Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions
(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin daily

Willow bark is traditionally used for pain and conditions of inflammation. According to one controlled clinical trial, use of high amounts of willow bark extract may help people with low back pain. One trial found 240 mg of salicin from a willow extract to be more effective than 120 mg of salicin or a placebo for treating exacerbations of low back pain.1

References

1. Chrubasik S, Eisenberg E, Balan E, et al. Treatment of low back pain exacerbations with willow bark extract: A randomized double-blind study. Am J Med 2000;109:9-14.

Osteoarthritis
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin per dayWillow has anti-inflammatory and pain-relieving properties. Although pain relief from willow supplementation may be slow in coming, it may last longer than pain relief from aspirin. One double-blind trial found that a product containing willow along with black cohosh, guaiac (Guaiacum officinale, G. sanctum), sarsaparilla, and aspen (Populus spp.) bark effectively reduced osteoarthritis pain compared to placebo.1 Another trial found that 1,360 mg of willow bark extract per day (delivering 240 mg of salicin) was somewhat effective in treating pain associated with knee and/or hip osteoarthritis.2
References

1. Mills SY, Jacoby RK, Chacksfield M, Willoughby M. Effect of a proprietary herbal medicine on the relief of chronic arthritic pain: A double-blind study. Br J Rheum 1996;35:874-8.

2. Schmid B, Tschirdewahn B, Katter I, et al. Analgesic effects of willow bark extract in osteoarthritis: results of a clinical double-blind trial. Fact 1998;3:186.

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Although willow is slow acting as a pain reliever, the effect is thought to last longer than the effect of willow's synthetic cousin, aspirin. One double-blind trial found that willow bark combined with guaiac, sarsaparilla, black cohosh, and poplar (each tablet contained 100 mg of willow bark, 40 mg of guaiac, 35 mg of black cohosh, 25 mg of sarsaparilla, and 17 mg of poplar) relieved pain due to RA better than placebo over a two-month period.1 The exact amount of the herbal combination used in the trial is not given, however, and patients were allowed to continue their other pain medications. Clinical trials on willow alone for RA are lacking. Some experts suggest that willow may be taken one to four weeks before results are noted.2

References

1. Mills SY, Jacoby RK, Chacksfield M, Willoughby M. Effect of a proprietary herbal medicine on the relief of chronic arthritic pain: A double-blind study. Br J Rheum 1996;35:874-8.

2. Upton R, Petrone C, eds. Willow bark (Salix spp.) monograph. Santa Cruz, CA: American Herbal Pharmacopoeia, 1999.

Bursitis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

While there have been few studies on herbal therapy for bursitis, most practitioners would consider using anti-inflammatory herbs that have proven useful in conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis. These would include boswellia, turmeric, willow, and topical cayenne ointment.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Take an extract supplying 240 mg of salicin daily

Willow bark is traditionally used for pain and conditions of inflammation. According to one controlled clinical trial, use of high amounts of willow bark extract may help people with low back pain. One trial found 240 mg of salicin from a willow extract to be more effective than 120 mg of salicin or a placebo for treating exacerbations of low back pain.1

References

1. Chrubasik S, Eisenberg E, Balan E, et al. Treatment of low back pain exacerbations with willow bark extract: A randomized double-blind study. Am J Med 2000;109:9-14.

Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

As early as 1763, use of willow bark to decrease pain and inflammation was reported.1 Its constituents are chemically related to aspirin. These constituents may decrease pain by two methods: by interfering with the process of inflammation, and by interfering with pain-producing nerves in the spinal cord.2 No human studies have investigated the pain-relieving potential of willow bark, and questions have been raised as to the actual absorption of willow bark's pain-relieving constituents.3 The potential pain-reducing action of willow is typically slower than that of aspirin.

References

1. Hedner T, Everts B. The early clinical history of salicylates in rheumatology and pain. Clin Rheumatol 1998;17:17-25.

2. Cherng CH, Wong CS, Ho ST. Spinal actions of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Acta Anaesthesiol Sin 1996;34:81-8.

3. Robbers JE, Tyler VE. Tyler's Herbs of Choice: The Therapeutic Use of Phytomedicinals. New York: Haworth Press, 1999, 200-4.

Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructionsWillow bark was used traditionally by herbalists for fever, headache, pain, and rheumatic complaints.1 In the late 19th century, the constituent salicylic acid was isolated from willow bark and went on to become the model for the development of aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid).2
References

1. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum, 1988, 31, 303.

2. Foster S. 101 Medicinal Herbs. Loveland, CO: Interweave Press, 1998, 210-1.

Parts Used & Where Grown

The willow tree grows primarily in central and southern Europe, although it is also found in North America. The bark is used to make herbal extracts.

Copyright 2015 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2016.

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