North American Herb & Spice Essence of Wild Sage

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Item #803448

Size: 12 fl.oz.

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Product Information

Description

Wild aromatic essence
Oxygenated tonic, steam extracted, wild Mediterranean source
Essence of Wild Sage is made with only deep underground source spring waters that reside in the mineral -and nutrient-rich rock and soil. These liquids are quickly activated in the body because of the important oxygenated compounds, which are the results of a special process using only steam-extracted, wild, mountain grown sage.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

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Supplement Facts

Serving Size 2 Tablespoons
Servings Per Container 12
Amount Per Serving % DV
Proprietary Blend 0.00**
essence of wild sage 0.00**
Spring water 0.00 **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

Take one to two tablespoons in juice or water daily. As a soothing tea, add two tablespoons to a cup of hot water.

Chemical free, Non-GMO

Warning: Statements have not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

North American Herb & Spice
P.O. Box 4885
Buffalo Grove, IL 60089

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Health Notes

Sage

Sage
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Menopause
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried herb or equivalent
Supplementing with sage leaf and alfalfa extract completely eliminated hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women in one study.(more)
Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night. It is believed this is because sage directly decreases sweat production.(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage has traditionally been used to dry up milk production when a woman no longer wishes to breast-feed.(more)
Menopause
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried herb or equivalent
Supplementing with sage leaf and alfalfa extract completely eliminated hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women in one study.(more)
Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night. It is believed this is because sage directly decreases sweat production.(more)
Gingivitis
Dose: 0.5 ml in half a glass of water three times per day swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out
A mouthwash containing sage oil, peppermint oil, menthol, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from echinacea, myrrh tincture, clove oil, and caraway oil has been used successfully to treat gingivitis.(more)
Halitosis
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Volatile oils made from sage have antibacterial properties and may be effective in mouthwash or toothpaste form.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried leaf or equivalent, for indigestion
Sage is a gas-relieving herb that may be helpful in calming an upset stomach.(more)
Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: 60 drops daily of a 1:1 tincture
Sage appears to have an effect on acetylcholine, one of the chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) in the brain and supplementing with sage has resulted in a significant improvement in cognitive function.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage tea may be gargled to soothe a sore throat.(more)
Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage is an herb that directly attack microbes.(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sage has traditionally been used to dry up milk production when a woman no longer wishes to breast-feed.(more)
Menopause
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried herb or equivalentSage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night.1 It is believed this is because sage directly decreases production of sweat. In a preliminary study, supplementation with a product containing extracts of the leaves of sage and alfalfa resulted in complete elimination of hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women, with varying degrees of improvement in the other ten cases.2
References

1. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 420-1 [review].

2. De Leo V, Lanzetta D, Cazzavacca R, Morgante G. [Treatment of neurovegetative menopausal symptoms with a phytotherapeutic agent] [Article in Italian] Minerva Ginecol 1998;50:207-11.

Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Sage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night.1 It is believed this is because sage directly decreases production of sweat. In a preliminary study, supplementation with a product containing extracts of the leaves of sage and alfalfa resulted in complete elimination of hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women, with varying degrees of improvement in the other ten cases.2

References

1. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 420-1 [review].

2. De Leo V, Lanzetta D, Cazzavacca R, Morgante G. [Treatment of neurovegetative menopausal symptoms with a phytotherapeutic agent] [Article in Italian] Minerva Ginecol 1998;50:207-11.

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Sage has traditionally been used to dry up milk production when a woman no longer wishes to breast-feed.1 It should not be taken during pregnancy.

References

1. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd., 1988, 229-30.

Menopause
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried herb or equivalentSage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night.1 It is believed this is because sage directly decreases production of sweat. In a preliminary study, supplementation with a product containing extracts of the leaves of sage and alfalfa resulted in complete elimination of hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women, with varying degrees of improvement in the other ten cases.2
References

1. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 420-1 [review].

2. De Leo V, Lanzetta D, Cazzavacca R, Morgante G. [Treatment of neurovegetative menopausal symptoms with a phytotherapeutic agent] [Article in Italian] Minerva Ginecol 1998;50:207-11.

Menopause
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Sage may reduce excessive perspiration due to menopausal hot flashes during the day or at night.1 It is believed this is because sage directly decreases production of sweat. In a preliminary study, supplementation with a product containing extracts of the leaves of sage and alfalfa resulted in complete elimination of hot flushes and night sweats in 20 of 30 women, with varying degrees of improvement in the other ten cases.2

References

1. Duke JA. CRC Handbook of Medicinal Herbs. Boca Raton, FL: CRC Press, 1985, 420-1 [review].

2. De Leo V, Lanzetta D, Cazzavacca R, Morgante G. [Treatment of neurovegetative menopausal symptoms with a phytotherapeutic agent] [Article in Italian] Minerva Ginecol 1998;50:207-11.

Gingivitis
Dose: 0.5 ml in half a glass of water three times per day swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out

A mouthwash combination that includes sage oil, peppermint oil, menthol, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from echinacea, myrrh tincture, clove oil, and caraway oil has been used successfully to treat gingivitis.1 In cases of acute gum inflammation, 0.5 ml of the herbal mixture in half a glass of water three times daily is recommended by some herbalists. This herbal preparation should be swished slowly in the mouth before spitting out. To prevent recurrences, slightly less of the mixture can be used less frequently.

A toothpaste containing sage oil, peppermint oil, chamomile tincture, expressed juice from Echinacea purpurea, myrrh tincture, and rhatany tincture has been used to accompany this mouthwash in managing gingivitis.2

Of the many herbs listed above, chamomile, echinacea, and myrrh should be priorities. These three herbs can provide anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial actions critical to successfully treating gingivitis.

References

1. Serfaty R, Itic J. Comparative trial with natural herbal mouthwash versus chlorhexidine in gingivitis. J Clin Dent 1988;1:A34-7.

2. Yamnkell S, Emling RC. Two-month evaluation of Parodontax dentifrice. J Clin Dentistry 1988;1:A41.

Halitosis
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

The potent effects of some commercial mouthwashes may be due to the inclusion of thymol (from thyme) and eukalyptol (from eucalyptus)-volatile oils that have proven activity against bacteria. One report showed bacterial counts plummet in as little as 30 seconds following a mouthrinse with the commercial mouthwash ListerineTM, which contains thymol and eukalyptol.1 Thymol alone has been shown in research to inhibit the growth of bacteria found in the mouth.2, 3 Because of their antibacterial properties, other volatile oils made from tea tree,4 clove, caraway, peppermint, and sage,5 as well as the herbs myrrh6 and bloodroot,7 might be considered in a mouthwash or toothpaste. Due to potential allergic reactions and potential side effects if some of these oils are swallowed, it is best to consult with a qualified healthcare professional before pursuing self-treatment with volatile oils that are not in approved over-the-counter products for halitosis.

References

1. Kato T, Iijima H, Ishihara K, et al. Antibacterial effects of Listerine on oral bacteria. Bull Tokyo Dent Coll 1990;31:301-7.

2. Cosentino S, Tuberoso CI, Pisano B, et al. In-vitro antimicrobial activity and chemical composition of Sardinian Thymus essential oils. Lett Appl Microbiol 1999;29:130-5.

3. Petersson LG, Edwardsson S, Arends J. Antimicrobial effect of a dental varnish, in vitro. Swed Dent J 1992;16:183-9.

4. Cox SD, Mann CM, Markham JL, et al. The mode of antimicrobial action of the essential oil of Melaleuca alternifolia (tea tree oil). J Appl Microbiol 2000;88:170-5.

5. Serfaty R, Itic J. Comparative trial with natural herbal mouthwash versus chlorhexidine in gingivitis. J Clin Dent 1988;1:A34-7.

6. Dolara P, Corte B, Ghelardini C, et al. Local anaesthetic, antibacterial and antifungal properties of sesquiterpenes from myrrh. Planta Med 2000;66:356-8.

7. Hannah JJ, Johnson JD, Kuftinec MM. Long-term clinical evaluation of toothpaste and oral rinse containing sanguinaria extract in controlling plaque, gingival inflammation, and sulcular bleeding during orthodontic treatment. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 1989;96:199-207.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: 4 to 6 grams daily of dried leaf or equivalent, for indigestion

Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.1

There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise, Basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, dill, ginger, oregano, rosemary, sage, lavender, and thyme.2 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.3 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4-6 grams of sage leaf.4 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

References

1. Forster HB, Niklas H, Lutz S. Antispasmodic effects of some medicinal plants. Planta Med 1980;40:303-19.

2. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 425-6.

3. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 185-6.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 198.

Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: 60 drops daily of a 1:1 tincture

In a double-blind study of people with Alzheimer's disease, supplementing with sage for four months resulted in a significant improvement in cognitive function, compared with a placebo.1 The amount of sage used was 60 drops per day of a 1:1 tincture. Although it is not known for sure how sage improves cognitive function, it appears to have an effect on acetylcholine, one of the chemical messengers (neurotransmitters) in the brain.

References

1. Akhondzadeh S, Noroozian M, Mohammadi M, et al. Salvia officinalis extract in the treatment of patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease: a double blind, randomized and placebo-controlled trial. J Clin Pharm Ther 2003;28:53-9.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Red raspberry, blackberry, and blueberry leaves contain astringent tannins that are helpful for soothing sore throats.1Sage tea may be gargled to soothe a sore throat. All of these remedies are used traditionally, but they are currently not supported by modern research.

References

1. Schilcher H. Phytotherapy in Paediatrics. Stuttgart, Germany: Medpharm Scientific Publishers, 1997, 126-7.

Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbs that directly attack microbes include the following: chaparral, eucalyptus, garlic, green tea, lemon balm (antiviral), lomatium, myrrh, olive leaf, onion, oregano, pau d'arco (antifungal), rosemary, sage, sandalwood, St. John's wort, tea tree oil, thyme, and usnea.

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Sage has traditionally been used to dry up milk production when a woman no longer wishes to breast-feed.1 It should not be taken during pregnancy.

References

1. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd., 1988, 229-30.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Sage is a silvery-green shrub with very fragrant leaves. The most commonly cultivated species of sage originally came from the area around the Mediterranean but now also grows in North America. The leaves of this common kitchen herb are used in medicine as well as in cooking.1

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.