Shea Moisture Coconut & Hibiscus Radiance-Boosting Cleansing Facial Wipes w/ Songyi Mushroom

Shea Moisture Coconut & Hibiscus Radiance-Boosting Cleansing Facial Wipes w/ Songyi Mushroom - SUNDIAL - GNC Zoom
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Size: 30 wipes

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Product Information

Description

Coconut & Hibiscus w/ Songyi Mushroom
Brighten & Even Dull, Uneven Skin
These biodegradable, naturally-infused towelettes remove makeup, dirt and impurities without rinsing or drying out skin. Coconut Oil nourishes skin with a blend of Vitamins E and K, iron and fatty acids while Hibiscus Flower and Songyi Mushroom naturally help to brighten and even skin tone. Skin is left soft, refreshed and radiant.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

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Supplement Facts

Product Directions / Additional Info

Gently wipe over eyelids, face and neck to cleanse the skin. Dispose of each wipe after each use. Reseal pack to keep wipes moist. Avoid direct contact with eyes.

Other Ingredients: Coconut Oil, Hibiscus flower, Songyi Mushroom Extract

Warning: SEE MANUFACTURER'S LABEL FOR ADDITIONAL PRODUCT INFORMATION AND SUPPLEMENT FACTS PANEL.

Sundial Brands LLC
11 Ranick Drive South . Amityville, NY 11701
Made in the USA
Mandelbomevagon 44080 Ellos, Sweden

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Health Notes

Hibiscus

Hibiscus
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Hypertension
Dose: 2 tsp (5 to 6 grams) dried flowers brewed as tea, taken two to three times per day
Two clinical trials have shown that hibiscus can lower blood pressure. The trials have suggested that Hibiscus sabdariffa tea may be as potent as some blood pressure medications.(more)
Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Hibiscus is a traditional remedy in India for diabetes, and is supported by preliminary research.(more)
Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Hibiscus is a traditional remedy in India for diabetes, and is supported by preliminary research.(more)
Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Hibiscus flowers contain substantial quantities of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins, which are associated with fever-reducing (antipyretic) activities.(more)
Hypertension
Dose: 2 tsp (5 to 6 grams) dried flowers brewed as tea, taken two to three times per day

Controlled clinical trials have shown that hibiscus can lower blood pressure.1 In one, people with high blood pressure who went off their medications were given either 2 teaspoons (5 to 6 grams) Hibiscus sabdariffa infused in 1 cup (250 ml) water or black tea three times per day.2 After 12 days the hibiscus group had significantly lower blood pressure than the black tea group. In another trial 10 grams of Hibiscus sabdariffa tea was compared to the drug captopril for four weeks in people with high blood pressure.3 Blood pressures fell an equal amount in both groups, suggesting this herbal tea may be as potent as some blood pressure medications.

References

1. McKay DL, Chen CY, Saltzman E, Blumberg JB. Hibiscus sabdariffa L. tea (tisane) lowers blood pressure in prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults. J Nutr 2010;140:298-303.

2. Haji Faraji M, Haji Tarkhani AH. The effect of sour tea (Hibiscus sabdariffa) on essential hypertension. J Ethnopharmacol 1999;65:231-6.

3. Herrera-Arellano A, Flores-Romero S, Chavez-Soto MA, Tortoriello J. Effectiveness and tolerability of a standardized extract from Hibiscus sabdariffa in patients with mild to moderate hypertension: a controlled and randomized clinical trial. Phytomedicine 2004;11(5):375-82.

Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructionsHibiscus is a traditional remedy in India for diabetes; this treatment is supported by preliminary studies from that country and by animal studies.1, 2 Hibiscus is usually taken as tea, such as 1 to 2 teaspoons (3 to 6 grams) of dried flower infused in to 1 cup (250 ml) three times per day.
References

1. Alam MM, Siddiqui MB, Hussain W. Treatment of diabetes through herbal drugs in rural India. Fitoterapia 1990;61:240-2.

2. Sachdewa A, Khemani LD. Effect of Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn ethanol flower extract on blood glucose and lipid profile in streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats. J Ethnopharmacol2003;89:61-6.

Type 1 Diabetes
Dose: Refer to label instructionsHibiscus is a traditional remedy in India for diabetes; this treatment is supported by preliminary studies from that country and by animal studies.1, 2 Hibiscus is usually taken as tea, 1 to 2 teaspoons (3 to 6 grams) of dried flower infused in to 1 cup (250 ml) of water three times per day.
References

1. Alam MM, Siddiqui MB, Hussain W. Treatment of diabetes through herbal drugs in rural India. Fitoterapia 1990;61:240-2.

2. Sachdewa A, Khemani LD. Effect of Hibiscus rosa sinensis Linn ethanol flower extract on blood glucose and lipid profile in streptozotocin induced diabetes in rats. J Ethnopharmacol2003;89:61-6.

Fever
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The flowers contain substantial quantities of flavonoids and proanthocyanidins,1 which are associated with antioxidant, fever-reducing (antipyretic), pain-relieving (analgesic), and spasm-inhibiting (spasmolytic) activities.2, 3 Of the many polysaccharides, the acidic polysaccharides show the most interesting properties.

References

1. Bruneton J. Pharmacognosy Phytochemistry Medicinal Plants,2nd ed. London: Intercept, 1999:24.

2. Dafallah AA, al-Mustafa Z. Investigation of the anti-inflammatory activity of Acacia nilotica and Hibiscus sabdariffa. Am J Chin Med 1996;24:263-9.

3. Salah AM, Gathumbi J, Vierling W. Inhibition of intestinal motility by methanol extracts of Hibiscus sabdariffa L. (Malvaceae) in rats. Phytother Res 2002;16:283-5.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Members of the Malvaceae family, various species of hibiscus are shrubs found practically around the globe. The flower of hibiscus is the part used as medicine. The most widely known and best-studied species tend to be annuals from the tropics, such as the two that are focused on here. There are, however, hardy perennial species that survive in colder climates. Another hibiscus not discussed here is Hibiscus esculenta, or okra.

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.