Trace Minerals Research Ionic Iodine from Potassium Iodide 225 mcg

Trace Minerals Research Ionic Iodine from Potassium Iodide 225 mcg - TRACE MINERALS RESEARCH - GNC Zoom
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Description

Ionic Iodine is a rich, concentrated liquid dietary supplement that provides 225 mcg of iodine from potassium iodide per serving, plus over 72 ionic trace minerals from ConcenTrace®, America’s #1 selling trace mineral supplement according to SPINS® data. Iodine is an important mineral that is used in the body in several different ways.* It may help support the following: healthy thyroid function, ATP production, hormone production, central nervous system function, immune function, and skin health.*

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

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Supplement Facts

Serving Size 3 Drops
Servings Per Container 320
Amount Per Serving % DV
Iodine (as Potassium Iodide) 225.00 mcg150%
ConcenTrace® Ionic Trace Minerals 100.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

Shake well. Using the metered dropper, take 3 drops daily with juice or food to mask the concentrated mineral flavor. Do not refrigerate.

Other Ingredients: Purified Water, Potassium Benzoate, Potassium Sorbate, Citric Acid

Gluten Free, NON GMO

Storage Instructions: Do not refrigerate.

Warning: Contains no known allergens

Trace Minerals Research P.O. Box 429 Roy, Utah 84067

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Health Notes

Iodine

Iodine
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Iodine is an essential nutrient for the development of the fetal thyroid gland which, in turn, is important for brain development.(more)
Pregnancy
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
In one study, iodine deficiency during pregnancy was associated with the babies being born with increased ADHD risk. If you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, discuss whether you might need iodine supplements with your doctor. (more)
Fibrocystic Breast Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Iodine appears to be helpful in treating FBD, it should be taken only under the guidance of a healthcare practitioner.(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Iodine is an essential nutrient for the development of the fetal thyroid gland which, in turn, is important for brain development.(more)
Pregnancy
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
In one study, iodine deficiency during pregnancy was associated with the babies being born with increased ADHD risk. If you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, discuss whether you might need iodine supplements with your doctor. (more)
Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
In one study, iodine deficiency during pregnancy was associated with the babies being born with increased ADHD risk. If you are pregnant or trying to get pregnant, discuss whether you might need iodine supplements with your doctor. (more)
Hypothyroidism
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iodine deficiency and excessive iodine intake can both lead to hypothyroidism, so ask your doctor if supplementing with iodine is right for you.(more)
Childhood Intelligence in Infants and Iodine Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructions
(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIodine is an essential nutrient for the development of the fetal thyroid gland which, in turn, is important for brain development. Even mild iodine deficiency during pregnancy may have an adverse effect on cognitive function of the child.1 In a preliminary study of women in Italy, iodine deficiency severe enough to cause hypothyroidism during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in their children.2 However, excessive iodine intake can also adversely affect the thyroid gland. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should ask their healthcare professional whether they should take a prenatal supplement that contains iodine.
References

1. Bath SC, Steer CD, Golding J, et al. Effect of inadequate iodine status in UK pregnant women on cognitive outcomes in their children: results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Lancet. 2013;382:331?7.

2. Vermiglio F, Lo Presti VP, Moleti M, et al. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders in the offspring of mothers exposed to mild-moderate iodine deficiency: a possible novel iodine deficiency disorder in developed countries. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:6054-60.

Pregnancy
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

In a preliminary study of women in Italy, iodine deficiency severe enough to cause hypothyroidism during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of ADHD in their children.1 Women who are contemplating pregnancy or who are pregnant should get adequate amounts of iodine in their diet and should discuss with their healthcare provider whether iodine supplementation is appropriate.

References

1. Vermiglio F, Lo Presti VP, Moleti M, et al. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders in the offspring of mothers exposed to mild-moderate iodine deficiency: a possible novel iodine deficiency disorder in developed countries. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:6054-60.

Fibrocystic Breast Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Some doctors use iodine to treat FBD symptoms. In animals, iodine deficiency can cause the equivalent of FBD.1 What appears to be the most effective form-diatomic iodine2-is not readily available, however. Some people are sensitive to iodine and high amounts can interfere with thyroid function. Therefore, supplemental iodine should only be taken with the guidance of a healthcare practitioner.

References

1. Krouse TB, Eskin BA, Mobini J. Age-related changes resembling fibrocystic disease in iodine-blocked rat breasts. Arch Pathol Lab Med 1979;103:631-4.

2. Ghent WR, Eskin BA, Low DA, Hill L. Iodine replacement in fibrocystic disease of the breast. Can J Surg 1993;36:453-60.

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIodine is an essential nutrient for the development of the fetal thyroid gland which, in turn, is important for brain development. Even mild iodine deficiency during pregnancy may have an adverse effect on cognitive function of the child.1 In a preliminary study of women in Italy, iodine deficiency severe enough to cause hypothyroidism during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder in their children.2 However, excessive iodine intake can also adversely affect the thyroid gland. Women who are pregnant or planning to become pregnant should ask their healthcare professional whether they should take a prenatal supplement that contains iodine.
References

1. Bath SC, Steer CD, Golding J, et al. Effect of inadequate iodine status in UK pregnant women on cognitive outcomes in their children: results from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). Lancet. 2013;382:331?7.

2. Vermiglio F, Lo Presti VP, Moleti M, et al. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders in the offspring of mothers exposed to mild-moderate iodine deficiency: a possible novel iodine deficiency disorder in developed countries. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:6054-60.

Pregnancy
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

In a preliminary study of women in Italy, iodine deficiency severe enough to cause hypothyroidism during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of ADHD in their children.1 Women who are contemplating pregnancy or who are pregnant should get adequate amounts of iodine in their diet and should discuss with their healthcare provider whether iodine supplementation is appropriate.

References

1. Vermiglio F, Lo Presti VP, Moleti M, et al. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders in the offspring of mothers exposed to mild-moderate iodine deficiency: a possible novel iodine deficiency disorder in developed countries. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:6054-60.

Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

In a preliminary study of women in Italy, iodine deficiency severe enough to cause hypothyroidism during pregnancy was associated with an increased risk of ADHD in their children.1 Women who are contemplating pregnancy or who are pregnant should get adequate amounts of iodine in their diet and should discuss with their healthcare provider whether iodine supplementation is appropriate.

References

1. Vermiglio F, Lo Presti VP, Moleti M, et al. Attention deficit and hyperactivity disorders in the offspring of mothers exposed to mild-moderate iodine deficiency: a possible novel iodine deficiency disorder in developed countries. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:6054-60.

Hypothyroidism
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

The relationship between iodine and thyroid function is complex. Iodine is required by the body to form thyroid hormone, and iodine deficiency can lead to goiter and hypothyroidism.1 Severe and prolonged iodine deficiency can potentially lead to serious types of hypothyroidism, such as myxedema or cretinism. It is estimated that one and a half billion people living in 118 countries around the world are at risk for developing iodine deficiency.2

Today, most cases of iodine deficiency occur in developing nations. In industrialized countries where iodized salt is used, iodine deficiency has become extremely rare. On the other hand, iodine toxicity has become a concern in some of these countries.3 Excessive iodine intake can result in either hypothyroidism4 or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid).5 Sources of iodine include foods (iodized salt, milk, water, seaweed, ground beef), dietary supplements (multiple vitamin-mineral formulas, seaweed extracts), drugs (potassium iodide, amiodarone, topical antiseptics), and iodine-containing solutions used in certain laboratory tests. Many nutritional supplements contain 150 mcg of iodine. While that amount of iodine should prevent a deficiency, it is not clear whether supplementing with iodine is necessary or desirable for most people. Those wishing to take a nutritional supplement containing iodine should consult a doctor.

References

1. Thilly CH, Swennen B, Bourdoux P, et al. The epidemiology of iodine-deficiency disorders in relation to goitrogenic factors and thyroid-stimulating-hormone regulation. Am J Clin Nutr 1993;57(2 Suppl):267S-70S.

2. Delange F. Risks and benefits of iodine supplementation. Lancet 1998;351:923-4.

3. Contempre B, Dumont JE, Ngo B, et al. Effect of selenium supplementation in hypothyroid subjects of an iodine and selenium deficient area: the possible danger of indiscriminate supplementation of iodine-deficient subjects with selenium. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 1991;73:213-5.

4. Chow CC, Phillips DIW, Lazarus JH, Parkes AB. Effect of low dose iodide supplementation on thyroid function in potentially susceptible subjects: are dietary iodide levels in Britain acceptable? Clin Endocrinol 1991;34:413-6.

5. Stewart JC, Vidor GI. Thyrotoxicosis induced by iodine contamination of food: a common unrecognized condition? Br Med J 1976;1:372-5.

Childhood Intelligence in Infants and Iodine Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructionsMaternal iodine deficiency during pregnancy, or dietary iodine deficiency during infancy, can lead to poor mental development in the child. In a preliminary study of Spanish schoolchildren whose average age was 11 years, the average IQ was significantly lower in those with low iodine status than in those with better iodine status.1
References

1. Santiago-Fernandez P, Torres-Barahona R, Muela-Martinez JA, et al. Intelligence quotient and iodine intake: a cross-sectional study in children. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 2004;89:3851-7.

Iodine is a trace mineral needed to make thyroid hormones, which are necessary for maintaining normal metabolism in all cells of the body.

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.