Nature's Answer® Bladderwrack

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Product Information

Description


Advanced Botanical Fingerprint®

Fucus vesiculosus
Our organic alcohol extracts are produced using our Bio-Chelated

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

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Supplement Facts

Serving Size 1 mL
Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) Thallus Extract 1000.00 **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

As a dietary supplement take 1/2-1 mL (approx. 14-28 drops) 3 times a day in a small amount of water.

Other Ingredients: Purified Water, coconut glycerin, 12-15% Certified Organic Alcohol

Gluten Free

Warning: Do not use if pregnant or nursing. If suffering from thyroid complications please consult with your healthcare practitioner before taking this product.

Nature’s Answer® Inc., Hauppauge, N.Y. 11788

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Health Notes

Bladderwrack

Bladderwrack
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Bladderwrack is a soothing herb traditionally used to treat reflux and heartburn.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Bladderwrack is a demulcent herb, meaning it seems to work by decreasing inflammation and forming a barrier against irritants such as stomach acid.(more)
Constipation
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Alginic acid, one of the major constituents in bladderwrack, is a type of dietary fiber that may be used to relieve constipation.(more)
Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Bladderwrack is high in mucilage, which may be advantageous for people with gastritis because its slippery nature soothes irritated mucus membranes of the digestive tract.(more)
Diarrhea
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Alginic acid, a constituent in bladderwrack, is a type of dietary fiber and as a result may help relieve diarrhea.(more)
Wound Healing
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Alginic acid is one of the main constituents in bladderwrack. Calcium alginate has shown promise as an agent to speed wound healing.(more)
Wound Healing
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Alginic acid is one of the main constituents in bladderwrack. Calcium alginate has shown promise as an agent to speed wound healing.(more)
Hypothyroidism
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Bladderwrack is a type of brown seaweed that contains iodine. Hypothyroidism due to insufficient iodine intake may improve with bladderwrack supplementation.(more)
Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Other herbs traditionally used to treat reflux and heartburn include digestive demulcents (soothing agents) such as aloe vera, slippery elm, bladderwrack, and marshmallow.1 None of these have been scientifically evaluated for effectiveness in GERD. However, a drug known as Gaviscon, containing magnesium carbonate (as an antacid) and alginic acid derived from bladderwrack, has been shown helpful for heartburn in a double-blind trial.2 It is not clear whether whole bladderwrack would be as useful as its alginic acid component.

References

1. Golan R. Optimal Wellness. New York: Ballantine Books, 1995, 373-4.

2. Chevrel B. A comparative crossover study on the treatment of heartburn and epigastric pain: Liquid Gaviscon and a magnesium-aluminum antacid gel. J Int Med Res 1980;8:300-3.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Demulcents herbs may be used to treat indigestion and heartburn. These herbs seem to work by decreasing inflammation and forming a physical barrier against stomach acid or other abdominal irritants. Examples of demulcent herbs include ginger, licorice, and slippery elm.

The mucilage content in slippery elm appears to act as a barrier against the damaging effects of acid on the esophagus in people with heartburn. It may also have an anti-inflammatory effect locally in the stomach and intestines. Two or more tablets or capsules (typically 400-500 mg each) may be taken three to four times per day. Alternatively, a tea is made by boiling 1/2-2 grams of the bark in 200 ml of water for 10 to 15 minutes, which is then cooled before drinking; three to four cups a day can be used. Tincture (5 ml three times per day) may also be taken but is believed to be less helpful. Marshmallow and bladderwrack may be used the same way as slippery elm.

Constipation
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The laxatives most frequently used world-wide come from plants. Herbal laxatives are either bulk-forming or stimulating.

Basil (Ocimum basilicum) seed has been found to relieve constipation by acting as a bulk-forming laxative in one preliminary study.1 A similar study showed the seeds to be useful following major surgery for elderly people with constipation.2Alginic acid, one of the major constituents in bladderwrack(Fucus vesiculosus), is a type of dietary fiber that may be used to relieve constipation. However, human studies have not been conducted on the effectiveness of bladderwrack for this condition.

References

1. Kocharatana P, et al. Clinical trial of maeng-lak seeds used as a bulk laxative. Maharaj Nakornratchasima Hosp Med Bull 1985;9:120-36.

2. Muangman V, Siripraiwan S, Ratanaolarn K, et al. A clinical trial of Ocimum canum Sims seeds as a bulk laxative in elderly post-operative patients. Ramathibodi Med J 1985;8:154-8.

Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Demulcent herbs, such as marshmallow, slippery elm, and bladderwrack, are high in mucilage. Mucilage might be advantageous for people with gastritis because its slippery nature soothes irritated mucus membranes of the digestive tract. Marshmallow is used for mild inflammation of the gastric mucosa.1

References

1. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al, eds. The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 167.

Diarrhea
Dose: Refer to label instructions

While fiber from dietary or herbal sources is often useful for constipation, it may also play a role in alleviating diarrhea. For example, 9-30 grams per day of psyllium seed (an excellent source of fiber) makes stool more solid and can help resolve symptoms of non-infectious diarrhea.1 Alginic acid, one of the major constituents in bladderwrack(Fucus vesiculosus), is a type of dietary fiber and as a result may potentially help relieve diarrhea. However, human studies have not been done on how effective bladderwrack is for this condition.

References

1. Eherer AH, Porter J, Fordtran JS. Effect of psyllium, calcium polycarbophil, and wheat bran on secretory diarrhea induced by phenolphthalein. Gastroenterol 1993;104:1007-12.

Wound Healing
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Alginic acid is one of the main constituents in bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), a type of brown algae (seaweed). Calcium alginate has shown promise as an agent to speed wound healing in animal studies1 but has not been demonstrated to be effective in humans.

References

1. Barnett SA, Varley SJ. The effects of calcium alginate on wound healing. Ann R Coll Surgeons Engl 1987;69:153-5.

Wound Healing
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Alginic acid is one of the main constituents in bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus), a type of brown algae (seaweed). Calcium alginate has shown promise as an agent to speed wound healing in animal studies1 but has not been demonstrated to be effective in humans.

References

1. Barnett SA, Varley SJ. The effects of calcium alginate on wound healing. Ann R Coll Surgeons Engl 1987;69:153-5.

Hypothyroidism
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Bladderwrack (Fucus vesiculosus) is a type of brown seaweed that contains variable amounts of iodine.1 Hypothyroidism due to insufficient intake of iodine may possibly improve with bladderwrack supplementation, though human studies have not confirmed this.

References

1. Norman JA, Pickford CJ, Sanders TW, et al. Human intake of arsenic and iodine from seaweed based food supplements and health foods available in the UK. Food Addit Contam 1987;5:103-9.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Bladderwrack is a type of brown algae (seaweed) that grows on the northern Atlantic and Pacific coasts of the United States and on the northern Atlantic coast and Baltic coast of Europe. The main stem of bladderwrack, known as the thallus, is used medicinally. The thallus has tough, air-filled pods or bladders to help the algae float-thus the name bladderwrack. Although bladderwrack is sometimes called kelp, that name is not specific to this species and should be avoided.

Copyright 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

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The information presented by Healthnotes is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. Self-treatment is not recommended for life-threatening conditions that require medical treatment under a doctor's care. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2017.