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New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®

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Description
Natural Formula to Support Healthy Urinary Flow & Function*
  • Over 5 Million Bottles Sold
  • Reduces Frequent Urination
  • Helps Aging Prostate
  • Supports Continuous Sleep

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

As a dietary supplement, take two (2)caplets daily, one (1) in the morning and one (1) caplet in the evening; or as instructed by a healthcare provider.

Serving Size 2 Caplets
Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Copper (Oxide) 2.00 mg 100%
Manganese (as Amino Acid Chelate) 2.00 mg 100%
Chromium (Nicotinate Glycinate Chelate) 120.00 mcg 100%
Molybdenum (as Amino Acid Chelate) 75.00 mcg 100%
Selenium (Amino Acid Chelate) 70.00 mcg 100%
Vitamin D (as Cholecalciferol) 400.00 IU 100%
Zinc (as Zinc Oxide) 15.00 mg 100%
Mixed Sterols from Natural Plant Sources (Beta-Sitosterol 250 mg) 600.00 mcg **
Silicon (dioxide) 10.00 mg **
Boron (chelate) 3.00 mg **
Vanadium (sulfate) 1.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Oyster Shell, Stearic Acid, Microcrystalline Cellulose, Croscarmellose Sodium, Magnesium Stearate, Pharmaceutical Glaze

Sugar Free, Gluten Free

Warning: Consult a physician before using it on a medication. Do not use if the inner seal is missing or broken. Keep out of reach of children. Store in a cool, dry place.

Manufactured for and Distributed by: New Vitality® 260 Smith Street Farmingdale, NY 11735

Health Notes

Beta-Carotene

Beta-Carotene
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Photosensitivity
Dose: 100,000 to 300,000 IU daily under medical supervision
Beta-carotene is able to protect against free-radical damage caused by ultraviolet light and may help increase tolerance to sunlight.(more)
Sunburn
Dose: 6 mg daily of natural beta-carotene during periods of high sun exposure
Supplementing with beta-carotene may help protect the skin from ultraviolet rays and sunburn.(more)
Immune Function
Dose: 25,000 to 100,000 IU per day for nonsmokers only
Beta-carotene has been shown to increase immune cell numbers and activity. It has also been shown to enhance cancer-fighting immune functions in healthy people.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Beta-carotene levels have been found to be low in HIV-positive people, supplementing with it may be beneficial.(more)
Asthma
Dose: 64 mg a day of natural supplement
Some researchers have suggested that exercise-related asthma attacks might be caused by free-radical damage caused by the exercise. Supplementing with beta-carotene, an antioxidant, protects against free-radical damage and may prevent these attacks.(more)
Pancreatic Insufficiency
Dose: 9,000 IU daily
Taking antioxidant supplements, such as beta-carotene, may lessen pain and prevent recurrences of pancreatitis.(more)
Night Blindness
Dose: If deficient: 10,000 to 25,000 IU daily
Night blindness may be an early sign of vitamin A deficiency. Supplementing with beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A, help correct such a deficiency and improve night blindness.(more)
Macular Degeneration
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sunlight triggers oxidative damage in the eye, which can cause macular degeneration. Beta-carotene protects against oxidative damage and may reduce macular degeneration risk.(more)
Age-Related Cognitive Decline
Dose: 50 mg every other day
In one study, long-term beta-carotene supplementation slowed the loss of cognitive function in middle-aged healthy males. (more)
Night Blindness
Dose: If deficient: 10,000 to 25,000 IU daily
Night blindness may be an early sign of vitamin A deficiency. Supplementing with beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A, help correct such a deficiency and improve night blindness.(more)
Macular Degeneration
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Sunlight triggers oxidative damage in the eye, which can cause macular degeneration. Beta-carotene protects against oxidative damage and may reduce macular degeneration risk.(more)
Cataracts
Dose: Refer to label instructions
People who eat fruits and vegetables rich in beta-carotene have a lower risk of developing cataracts.(more)
Heart Attack
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Supplementing with beta-carotene may reduce the likelihood of a heart attack and may improve the outcome for people who have already had a heart attack.(more)
Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The antioxidant beta-carotene may reduce free radical damage in the stomach, and supplementing with it has led to improvements in people with gastritis in some studies.(more)
Age-Related Cognitive Decline
Dose: 50 mg every other day
In one study, long-term beta-carotene supplementation slowed the loss of cognitive function in middle-aged healthy males. (more)
Leukoplakia
Dose: 150,000 IU twice per week
Beta-carotene, the most widely used supplement in the treatment of leukoplakia, has been shown in studies to increase remission rate.(more)
Photosensitivity
Dose: 100,000 to 300,000 IU daily under medical supervision

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Years ago, researchers theorized that beta-carotene in skin might help protect against sensitivity to ultraviolet light from the sun. Large amounts of beta-carotene (up to 300,000 IU per day for at least several months) have allowed people with photosensitivity to stay out in the sun several times longer than they otherwise could tolerate.1, 2, 3 The protective effect appears to result from beta-carotene's ability to protect against free-radical damage caused by sunlight.4

References

1. Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Fitzpatrick TB, et al. Beta-carotene as an oral photoprotective agent in erythropoietic protoporphyria. JAMA 1974;228:1004-8.

2. Nordlund JJ, Klaus SN, Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA. New therapy for polymorphous light eruption. Arch Dermatol 1973;108:710-2.

3. Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Fitzpatrick TB, et al. Beta-carotene as a photoprotective agent in erythropoietic protoporphyria. N Engl J Med 1970;282:1231-4.

4. Mathews-Roth MM. Photoprotection by carotenoids. Fed Proc 1987;46:1890-3 [review].

Sunburn
Dose: 6 mg daily of natural beta-carotene during periods of high sun exposure

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Antioxidants may protect the skin from sunburn due to free radical-producing ultraviolet rays.1 Combinations of 1,000 to 2,000 IU per day of vitamin E and 2,000 to 3,000 mg per day of vitamin C, but neither given alone, have a significant protective effect against ultraviolet rays, according to double-blind studies.2, 3, 4

Oral synthetic beta-carotene alone was not found to provide effective protection when given in amounts of 15 mg per day or for only a few weeks' time in larger amounts of 60 to 90 mg per day, but it has been effective either in very large amounts (180 mg per day) or in smaller amounts (30 mg per day) in combination with topical sunscreen.5, 6, 7, 8, 9

Natural sources of beta-carotene or other carotenoids have been more consistently shown to protect against sunburn. One controlled study found that taking a supplement of natural carotenoids (almost all of which was beta-carotene) in daily amounts of 30 mg, 60 mg, and 90 mg gave progressively more protection against ultraviolet rays.10 In another controlled study, either 24 mg per day of natural beta-carotene or 24 mg per day of a carotenoid combination of equal amounts beta-carotene, lutein, and lycopene helped protect skin from ultraviolet rays.11 A preliminary study compared synthetic lycopene (10.1 mg per day), a natural tomato extract containing 9.8 mg of lycopene per day plus additional amounts of other carotenoids, and a solubilized tomato drink (designed to increase lycopene absorption) containing 8.2 mg of lycopene plus additional amounts of other carotenoids. After 12 weeks, only the two tomato-based products were shown to give significant protection against burning by ultraviolet light.12

Still other trials have tested combinations of several antioxidants. One preliminary study found that a daily combination of beta-carotene (6 mg), lycopene (6 mg), vitamin E (15 IU), and selenium for seven weeks protected against ultraviolet light.13 However, a double-blind trial of a combination of smaller amounts of several carotenoids, vitamins C and E, selenium, and proanthocyanidins did not find significant UV protection compared with placebo.14 Similarly, in a controlled trial, a combination of selenium, copper, and vitamins was found to be ineffective.15

It should be noted that while protection from sunburn has been demonstrated with several types of orally administered antioxidants, the degree of protection (typically less than an SPF of 2) is much less than that provided by currently available topical sunscreens. On the other hand, these modest effects will provide some added protection to skin areas where sunscreen is also used and will give a small amount of protection to sun-exposed areas where sunscreen is not applied. However, oral protection from sunburn is not instantaneous; maximum effects are not reached until these antioxidants have been used for about eight to ten weeks.16, 17

References

1. Fuchs J. Potentials and limitations of the natural antioxidants RRR-alpha-tocopherol, L-ascorbic acid and beta-carotene in cutaneous photoprotection. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:848-73 [review].

2. Werninghaus K, Meydani M, Bhawan J, et al. Evaluation of the photoprotective effect of oral vitamin E supplementation. Arch Dermatol 1994;130:1257-61.

3. Fuchs J, Kern H. Modulation of UV-light-induced skin inflammation by D-alpha-tocopherol and L-ascorbic acid: a clinical study using solar simulated radiation. Free Radic Biol Med 1998;25:1006-12.

4. Eberlein-Konig B, Placzek M, Przybilla B. Protective effect against sunburn of combined systemic ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and d-alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E). J Am Acad Dermatol 1998;38:45-8.

5. McArdle F, Rhodes LE, Parslew RA, et al. Effects of oral vitamin E and beta-carotene supplementation on ultraviolet radiation-induced oxidative stress in human skin. Am J Clin Nutr 2004;80:1270-5.

6. Garmyn M, Ribaya-Mercado JD, Russel RM, et al. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on the human sunburn reaction. Exp Dermatol 1995;4:104-11.

7. Wolf C, Steiner A, Honigsmann H, et al. Do oral carotenoids protect human skin against UV erythema, psoralen phototoxicity, and UV-induced DNA damage? J Invest Dermatol 1988;90:55-57.

8. Mathews-Roth MM, Pathak MA, Parrish J, et al. A clinical trial of the effects of oral beta-carotene on the responses of human skin to solar radiation. J Invest Dermatol 1972;59:349-53.

9. Gollnick HP, Hopfenmuller W, Hemmes C, et al. Systemic B-carotene plus topical sunscreen are an optimal protection against harmful effects of natural UV-sunlight. Eur J Dermatol 1996;6:200-5.

10. Lee J, Jiang S, Levine N, Watson RR. Carotenoid supplementation reduces erythema in human skin after simulated solar radiation exposure. Proc Soc Exp Biol Med 2000;223:170-4.

11. Heinrich U, Gartner C, Wiebusch M, et al. Supplementation with beta-carotene or a similar amount of mixed carotenoids protects humans from UV-induced erythema. J Nutr 2003;133:98-101.

12. Aust O, Stahl W, Sies H, et al. Supplementation with tomato-based products increases lycopene, phytofluene, and phytoene levels in human serum and protects against UV-light-induced erythema. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 2005;75:54-60.

13. Cesarini JP, Michel L, Maurette JM, et al. Immediate effects of UV radiation on the skin: modification by an antioxidant complex containing carotenoids. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 2003;19:182-9.

14. Greul AK, Grundmann JU, Heinrich F, et al. Photoprotection of UV-irradiated human skin: an antioxidative combination of vitamins E and C, carotenoids, selenium and proanthocyanidins. Skin Pharmacol Appl Skin Physiol 2002;15:307-15.

15. La Ruche G, Cesarini JP. Protective effect of oral selenium plus copper associated with vitamin complex on sunburn cell formation in human skin. Photodermatol Photoimmunol Photomed 1991;8:232-5.

16. Sies H, Stahl W. Nutritional protection against skin damage from sunlight. Annu Rev Nutr 2004;24:173-200 [review].

17. Sies H, Stahl W. Carotenoids and UV protection. Photochem Photobiol Sci 2004;3:749-52 [review].

Immune Function
Dose: 25,000 to 100,000 IU per day for nonsmokers only

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Most,1, 2 but not all,3 double-blind studies have shown that elderly people have better immune function and reduced infection rates when taking a multiple vitamin-mineral formula. In one double-blind trial, supplements of 100 mcg per day of selenium and 20 mg per day of zinc, with or without additional vitamin C, vitamin E, and beta-carotene, reduced infections in elderly people, though vitamins without minerals had no effect.4 Burn victims have also experienced fewer infections after receiving trace mineral supplements in double-blind research.5 These studies suggest that trace minerals may be the most important micronutrients for enhancing immunity and preventing infections in the elderly.

Beta-carotene and other carotenoids have increased immune cell numbers and activity in animal and human research, an effect that appears to be separate from their role as precursors to vitamin A.6, 7 Placebo-controlled research has shown positive benefits of beta-carotene supplements in increasing numbers of some white blood cells and enhancing cancer-fighting immune functions in healthy people at 25,000-100,000 IU per day.8, 9

In double-blind trials in the elderly, supplementation with 40,000-150,000 IU per day of beta-carotene has increased natural killer (NK) cell activity,10 but not several other measures of immunity.11

Controlled research has found that 50,000 IU per day of beta-carotene boosted immunity in people with colon cancer but in not those with precancerous conditions in the colon.12 Beta-carotene has also prevented immune suppression from ultraviolet light exposure.13 Effects on immunodefiency in HIV-positive people have been inconsistent using beta-carotene.14, 15

References

1. Pike J, Chandra RK. Effect of vitamin and trace element supplementation on immune indices in healthy elderly. Int J Vitam Nutr Res 1995;65:117-21.

2. Chandra RK. Effect of vitamin and trace-element supplementation on immune responses and infection in elderly subjects. Lancet 1992;340:1124-7.

3. Chavance M, Herbeth B, Lemoine A, et al. Does multivitamin supplementation prevent infections in healthy elderly subjects? A controlled trial.Int.J Vitam Nutr Res 1993;63:11-6.

4. Girodon F, Lombard M, Galan P, et al. Effect of micronutrient supplementation on infection in institutionalized elderly subjects: a controlled trial. Ann Nutr Metab 1997;41:98-107.

5. Berger MM, Spertini F, Shenkin A, et al. Trace element supplementation modulates pulmonary infection rates after major burns: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Am J Clin Nutr 1998;68:365-71.

6. Chew BP. Role of carotenoids in the immune response. J Dairy Sci 1993;76:2804-11.

7. Bendich A. Beta-carotene and the immune response. Proc Nutr Soc 1991;50:263-74.

8. Hughes DA, Wright AJ, Finglas PM, et al. The effect of beta-carotene supplementation on the immune function of blood monocytes from healthy male nonsmokers. J Lab Clin Med 1997;129:309-17.

9. Murata T, Tamai H, Morinobu T, et al. Effect of long-term administration of beta-carotene on lymphocyte subsets in humans. Am J Clin Nutr 1994;60:597-602.

10. Santos MS, Meydani SN, Leka L, et al. Natural killer cell activity in elderly men is enhanced by beta-carotene supplementation. Am J Clin Nutr 1996;64:772-7.

11. Santos MS, Leka LS, Ribaya-Mercado JD, et al. Short- and long-term beta-carotene supplementation do not influence T cell-mediated immunity in healthy elderly persons. Am J Clin Nutr 1997;66:917-24.

12. Kazi N, Radvany R, Oldham T, et al. Immunomodulatory effect of beta-carotene on T lymphocyte subsets in patients with resected colonic polyps and cancer. Nutr Cancer 1997;28:140-5.

13. Fuller CJ, Faulkner H, Bendich A, et al. Effect of beta-carotene supplementation on photosuppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity in normal young men. Am J Clin Nutr 1992;56:684-90.

14. Coodley GO, Coodley MK, Lusk R, et al. Beta-carotene in HIV infection: an extended evaluation. AIDS 1996;10:967-73.

15. Fryburg DA, Mark RJ, Griffith BP, et al. The effect of supplemental beta-carotene on immunologic indices in patients with AIDS: a pilot study. Yale J Biol Med 1995;68:19-23.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Beta-carotene levels have been found to be low in HIV-positive people, even in those without symptoms.1 However, trials on the effect of beta-carotene supplements have produced conflicting results. In one double-blind trial, supplementing with 300,000 IU per day of beta-carotene significantly increased the number of CD4+ cells in people with HIV infection.2 In a second double-blind study, supplementing with natural mixed carotenoids equivalent to 120,000 IU of beta-carotene per day significantly prolonged survival times in adults with advanced AIDS who were also receiving conventional therapy and a multivitamin.3 In another trial, however, 300,000 IU per day of beta-carotene had no effect on CD4+ cell counts or various other measures of immune function in HIV-infected people.4

References

1. Sappey C, Leclercq P, Coudray C, et al. Vitamin, trace element and peroxide status in HIV seropositive patients: asymptomatic patients present a severe beta-carotene deficiency. Clin Chim Acta 1994;230:35-42.

2. Coodley GO, Nelson HD, Loveless MO, Folk C. Beta-carotene in HIV infection. J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr 1993;6:272-6.

3. Austin J, Singhal N, Voigt R, et al. A community randomized controlled clinical trial of mixed carotenoids and micronutrient supplementation of patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Eur J Clin Nutr 2006;60:1266-76.

4. Coodley GO, Coodley MK, Lusk R, et al. Beta-carotene in HIV infection: an extended evaluation. AIDS 1996;10:967-73.

Asthma
Dose: 64 mg a day of natural supplement

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Some researchers have suggested that asthma attacks triggered by exercise might be caused by free-radical damage caused by the exercise. Beta-carotene is an antioxidant that protects against free-radical damage. Israeli researchers reported that 64 mg per day of natural beta-carotene for one week in a double blind trial protected over half of a group of asthmatics who experienced attacks as a result of exercise.1 More research is needed to confirm this promising finding.

References

1. Neuman I, Nahum H, Ben-Amotz A. Prevention of exercise-induced asthma by a natural isomer mixture of beta-carotene. Ann Allergy Asthma Immunol 1999;82:549-53.

Pancreatic Insufficiency
Dose: 9,000 IU daily

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Free radical damage has been linked to pancreatitis in animal and human studies,1, 2, 3 suggesting that antioxidants might be beneficial for this disease. One controlled study found that chronic pancreatitis patients consumed diets significantly lower in several antioxidants due to problems such as appetite loss and abdominal symptoms.4 Several controlled studies found lower blood levels of antioxidants, such as selenium, vitamin A, vitamin E, vitamin C, glutathione, and several carotenoids, in patients with both acute and chronic pancreatitis.5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10

There are few controlled trials of antioxidant supplementation to patients with pancreatitis. One small controlled study of acute pancreatitis patients found that sodium selenite at a dose of 500 micrograms (mcg) daily resulted in decreased levels of a marker of free radical activity, and no patient deaths occurred.11 In a small double-blind trial including recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis patients, supplements providing daily doses of 600 mcg selenium, 9,000 IU beta-carotene, 540 mg vitamin C, 270 IU vitamin E, and 2,000 mg methionine significantly reduced pain, normalized several blood measures of antioxidant levels and free radical activity, and prevented acute recurrences of pancreatitis.12 These researchers later reported that continuing antioxidant treatment in these patients for up to five years or more significantly reduced the total number of days spent in the hospital and resulted in 78% of patients becoming pain-free and 88% returning to work.13 Another double-blind study using similar amounts of selenium, beta-carotene, vitamin C, vitamin E, and methionine as those in the study mentioned above reported significant improvements in pain and overall health in patients with chronic pancreatitis.14

References

1. Schoenberg MH, Birk D, Beger HG. Oxidative stress in acute and chronic pancreatitis. Am J Clin Nutr 1995;62:1306S-14S [review].

2. Schulz H, Niederau C, Klonowski-Stumpe H, et al. Oxidative stress in acute pancreatitis. Hepato-Gastroenterology 1999;46:2736-2750 [review].

3. Wallig MA. Xenobiotic metabolism, oxidant stress and chronic pancreatitis. Digestion 1998;59(suppl 4):13-24 [review].

4. Rose P, Fraine E, Hunt LP, et al. Dietary antioxidants and chronic pancreatitis. Hum Nutr Clin Nutr 1986;40:151-64.

5. Morris-Stiff GJ, Bowrey DJ, Oleesky D, et al. The antioxidant profiles of patients with recurrent acute and chronic pancreatitis. Am J Gastroenterol 1999;94:2135-40.

6. Gut A, Shiel N, Kay PM, et al. Heightened free radical activity in blacks with chronic pancreatitis at Johannesburg, South Africa. Clin Chim Acta 1994;230:189-99.

7. Bonham MJ, Abu-Zidan FM, Simovic MO, et al. Early ascorbic acid depletion is related to the severity of acute pancreatitis. Br J Surg 1999;86:1296-301.

8. Tsai K, Wang SS, Chen TS, et al. Oxidative stress: an important phenomenon with pathogenetic significance in the progression of acute pancreatitis. Gut 1998;42:850-6.

9. Braganza JM, Schofield D, Snehalatha C, Mohan V. Micronutrient antioxidant status in tropical compared with temperate-zone chronic pancreatitis. Scand J Gastroenterol 1993;28:1098-104.

10. Mathew P, Wyllie R, Van Lente F, et al. Antioxidants in hereditary pancreatitis. Am J Gastroenterol 1996;91:1558-62.

11. Kulinski B, Buchner M, Schweder R, Nagel R. Acute pancreatitis-a free radical disease. Decrease in fatality with sodium selenite (Na2SeO3) therapy. Z Gesamte Inn Med 1991;46:145-9 [in German].

12. Uden S, Bilton D, Nathan L, et al. Antioxidant therapy for recurrent pancreatitis: placebo-controlled trial. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1990;4:357-71.

13. McCloy R. Chronic pancreatitis at Manchester, UK. Focus on antioxidant therapy. Digestion 1998;59(suppl 4):36-48 [review].

14. Kirk GR, White JS, McKie L, et al. Combined antioxidant therapy reduces pain and improves quality of life in chronic pancreatitis. J Gastrointest Surg 2006;10:499-503.

Night Blindness
Dose: If deficient: 10,000 to 25,000 IU daily

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Night blindness may be an early sign of vitamin A deficiency.1, 2 Such a deficiency may result from diets low in animal foods (the main source of vitamin A), such as eggs, dairy products, organ meats, and some fish. Low intake of fruits and vegetables containing beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A, may also contribute to a vitamin A deficiency. Doctors often recommend 10,000 to 25,000 IU of vitamin A per day to correct a deficiency. Beta-carotene is less effective at correcting vitamin A deficiency than is vitamin A itself, because it is not absorbed as well and is only slowly converted by the body into vitamin A.

References

1. Anastasakis A, Plainis S, Giannakopoulou T, et at. Xerophthalmia and acquired night blindness in a patient with a history of gastrointestinal neoplasia and normal serum vitamin A levels. Doc Ophthalmol 2013 Apr;126(2):159-62. doi: 10.1007/s10633-012-9370-x. Epub 2013 Jan 20.

2. Fok JS, Li JY, Yong TY. Visual deterioration caused by vitamin A deficiency in patients after bariatric surgery. Eat Weight Disord 2012 Jun;17:e144-6.

Macular Degeneration
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Sunlight triggers oxidative damage in the eye, which in turn can cause macular degeneration.1 Animals given antioxidants-which protect against oxidative damage-have a lower risk of this vision problem.2 People with high blood levels of antioxidants also have a lower risk.3 Those with the highest levels (top 20th percentile) of the antioxidants selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin E may have a 70% lower risk of developing macular degeneration, compared with people with the lowest levels of these nutrients (bottom 20th percentile).4 People who eat fruits and vegetables high in beta-carotene, another antioxidant, are also at low risk.5 Some doctors recommend antioxidant supplements to reduce the risk of macular degeneration; reasonable adult levels include 200 mcg of selenium, 1,000 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E, and 25,000 IU of natural beta-carotene per day. However, a preliminary study found no association between age-related macular degeneration and intake of antioxidants, either from the diet, from supplements, or from both combined.6 Moreover, in a double-blind study of male cigarette smokers, supplementing with vitamin E (50 IU per day), synthetic beta-carotene (about 33,000 IU per day), or both did not reduce the incidence of age-related macular degeneration.7

References

1. Young RW. Solar radiation and age-related macular degeneration. Surv Ophthalmol 1988:32:252-69.

2. Katz ML, Parker KR, Handelman GJ, et al. Effects of antioxidant nutrient deficiency on the retina and retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats: a light and electron microscopic study. Exp Eye Res 1982;34:339-69.

3. West S, Vitale S, Hallfrisch J, et al. Are anti-oxidants or supplements protective of age-related macular degeneration? Arch Ophthalmol 1994:112:222-7.

4. Eye Disease Case-Control Study Group. Antioxidant status and neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Arch Ophthalmol 1993:111:104-9.

5. Goldberg J, Flowerdew G, Smith E, et al. Factors associated with age-related macular degeneration. Am J Epidemiol 1988:128:700-10.

6. Smith W, Mitchell P, Webb K, Leeder SR. Dietary antioxidants and age-related maculopathy: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology 1999;106:761-7.

7. Teikari JM, Laatikainen L, Virtamo J, et al. Six-year supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene and age-related maculopathy. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1998;76:224-9.

Age-Related Cognitive Decline
Dose: 50 mg every other day

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

In a double-blind trial, supplementation with beta-carotene in the amount of 50 mg every other day for 18 years appeared to slow the loss of cognitive function in middle-aged healthy males. Short-term supplementation (one year) was not beneficial.1

References

1. Grodstein F, Kang JH, Glynn RJ, et al. A randomized trial of beta carotene supplementation and cognitive function in men: the Physicians' Health Study II. Arch Intern Med 2007;167:2184-90.

Night Blindness
Dose: If deficient: 10,000 to 25,000 IU daily

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Night blindness may be an early sign of vitamin A deficiency.1, 2 Such a deficiency may result from diets low in animal foods (the main source of vitamin A), such as eggs, dairy products, organ meats, and some fish. Low intake of fruits and vegetables containing beta-carotene, which the body converts into vitamin A, may also contribute to a vitamin A deficiency. Doctors often recommend 10,000 to 25,000 IU of vitamin A per day to correct a deficiency. Beta-carotene is less effective at correcting vitamin A deficiency than is vitamin A itself, because it is not absorbed as well and is only slowly converted by the body into vitamin A.

References

1. Anastasakis A, Plainis S, Giannakopoulou T, et at. Xerophthalmia and acquired night blindness in a patient with a history of gastrointestinal neoplasia and normal serum vitamin A levels. Doc Ophthalmol 2013 Apr;126(2):159-62. doi: 10.1007/s10633-012-9370-x. Epub 2013 Jan 20.

2. Fok JS, Li JY, Yong TY. Visual deterioration caused by vitamin A deficiency in patients after bariatric surgery. Eat Weight Disord 2012 Jun;17:e144-6.

Macular Degeneration
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Sunlight triggers oxidative damage in the eye, which in turn can cause macular degeneration.1 Animals given antioxidants-which protect against oxidative damage-have a lower risk of this vision problem.2 People with high blood levels of antioxidants also have a lower risk.3 Those with the highest levels (top 20th percentile) of the antioxidants selenium, vitamin C, and vitamin E may have a 70% lower risk of developing macular degeneration, compared with people with the lowest levels of these nutrients (bottom 20th percentile).4 People who eat fruits and vegetables high in beta-carotene, another antioxidant, are also at low risk.5 Some doctors recommend antioxidant supplements to reduce the risk of macular degeneration; reasonable adult levels include 200 mcg of selenium, 1,000 mg of vitamin C, 400 IU of vitamin E, and 25,000 IU of natural beta-carotene per day. However, a preliminary study found no association between age-related macular degeneration and intake of antioxidants, either from the diet, from supplements, or from both combined.6 Moreover, in a double-blind study of male cigarette smokers, supplementing with vitamin E (50 IU per day), synthetic beta-carotene (about 33,000 IU per day), or both did not reduce the incidence of age-related macular degeneration.7

References

1. Young RW. Solar radiation and age-related macular degeneration. Surv Ophthalmol 1988:32:252-69.

2. Katz ML, Parker KR, Handelman GJ, et al. Effects of antioxidant nutrient deficiency on the retina and retinal pigment epithelium of albino rats: a light and electron microscopic study. Exp Eye Res 1982;34:339-69.

3. West S, Vitale S, Hallfrisch J, et al. Are anti-oxidants or supplements protective of age-related macular degeneration? Arch Ophthalmol 1994:112:222-7.

4. Eye Disease Case-Control Study Group. Antioxidant status and neovascular age-related macular degeneration. Arch Ophthalmol 1993:111:104-9.

5. Goldberg J, Flowerdew G, Smith E, et al. Factors associated with age-related macular degeneration. Am J Epidemiol 1988:128:700-10.

6. Smith W, Mitchell P, Webb K, Leeder SR. Dietary antioxidants and age-related maculopathy: the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Ophthalmology 1999;106:761-7.

7. Teikari JM, Laatikainen L, Virtamo J, et al. Six-year supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene and age-related maculopathy. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1998;76:224-9.

Cataracts
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

People with low blood levels of antioxidants and those who eat few antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables have been reported to be at high risk for cataracts.1, 2

Some,3 but not all,4 studies have reported that people eating more foods rich in beta-carotene had a lower the risk of developing cataracts. Supplementation with synthetic beta-carotene has not been found to reduce the risk of cataract formation.5 It remains unclear whether natural beta-carotene from food or supplements would protect the eye or whether beta-carotene in food is merely a marker for other protective factors in fruits and vegetables high in beta-carotene.

References

1. Jacques PF, Chylack LT Jr. Epidemiologic evidence of a role for the antioxidant vitamins and carotenoids in cataract prevention. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;53:352S-5S.

2. Knekt P, Heliovaara M, Rissanen A, et al. Serum antioxidant vitamins and risk of cataract. BMJ 1992;305:1392-4.

3. Hankinson SE, Stampfer MJ, Seddon JM, et al. Nutrient intake and cataract extraction in women: a prospective study. Br Med J 1992;305(6849):335-9.

4. Chasan-Taber L, Willett WC, Seddon JM, et al. A prospective study of vitamin supplement intake and cataract extraction among U.S. women. Epidemiology 1999;10:679-84.

5. Teikari JM, Virtamo J, Rautalahti M, et al. Long-term supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene and age-related cataract. Acta Ophthalmol Scand 1997;75:634-40.

Heart Attack
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Blood levels of the antioxidant nutrients vitamins A, C, and E, and beta-carotene are reported to be lower in people with a history of heart attack, compared with healthy individuals.1 The number of free radical molecules is also higher, suggesting a need for antioxidants. Streptokinase, a drug therapy commonly used immediately following a heart attack, enhances the need for antioxidants.2

Taking antioxidant supplements may improve the outcome for people who have already had a heart attack. In one double-blind trial, people were given 50,000 IU of vitamin A per day, 1,000 mg of vitamin C per day, 600 IU of vitamin E per day, and approximately 41,500 IU of beta-carotene per day or placebo.3 After 28 days, the infarct size of those receiving antioxidants was significantly smaller than the infarct size of the placebo group.

Low levels of beta-carotene in fatty tissue have been linked to an increased incidence of heart attacks, particularly among smokers.4 One population study found that eating a diet high in beta-carotene is associated with a lower rate of nonfatal heart attacks.5 However, beta-carotene supplementation may not offer the same protection provided by foods that contain beta-carotene. Most,6, 7 but not all, trials8 have found that supplemental beta-carotene is not associated with a reduced risk of heart attacks.

References

1. Singh RB, Niaz MA, Sharma JP, et al. Plasma levels of antioxidant vitamins and oxidative stress in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Acta Cardiol 1994;49:441-52.

2. Levy Y, Bartha P, Ben-Amotz A, et al. Plasma antioxidants and lipid peroxidation in acute myocardial infarction and thrombolysis. J Am Coll Nutr 1998;17:337-41.

3. Singh RB, Niaz MA, Rastogi SS, Tastogi S. Usefulness of antioxidant vitamins in suspected acute myocardial infarction (the Indian experiment of infarct survival-3). Am J Cardiol 1996;77:232-6.

4. Kardinaal AFM, Kok FJ, Ringstad J, et al. Antioxidants in adipose tissue and risk of myocardial infarction: the EURAMIC study. Lancet 1993;342:1379-84.

5. Tavani A, Negri E, D'Avanzo B, La Vecchia C. Beta-carotene intake and risk of nonfatal acute myocardial infarction in women. Eur J Epidemiol 1997;13:631-7.

6. Rapola JM, Virtamo J, Ripatti S, et al. Randomised trial of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplements on incidence of major coronary events in men with previous myocardial infraction. Lancet 1997;349:1715-20.

7. Virtamo J, Rapola JM, Ripatti S, et al. Effect of vitamin E and beta carotene on the incidence of primary nonfatal myocardial infarction and fatal coronary heart disease. Arch Intern Med 1998;158:668-75.

8. Klipstein-Grobusch K, Geleijnse JM, den Breeijen JH, et al. Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study. Am J Clin Nutr 1999;69:261-6.

Gastritis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

The antioxidant beta-carotene may reduce free radical damage in the stomach,1 and eating foods high in beta-carotene has been linked to a decreased risk of developing chronic atrophic gastritis.2 Moreover, people with active gastritis have been reported to have low levels of beta-carotene in their stomachs.3 In a preliminary trial, giving 30,000 IU of beta-carotene per day to people with ulcers or gastritis led to the disappearance of gastric erosions.4 In another study, combining vitamin C and beta-carotene also led to improvement in most people with chronic atrophic gastritis.5

References

1. Spirichev VB, Levachev MM, Rymarenko TV, et al. The effect of administration of beta-carotene in an oil solution on its blood serum level and antioxidant status of patients with duodenal ulcer and erosive gastritis. Vopr Med Khim 1992;38(6):44-7 [in Russian].

2. Palli D, Decarli A, Cipriani F, et al. Plasma pepsinogens, nutrients, and diet in areas of Italy at varying gastric cancer risk. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 1991;1(1):45-50.

3. Zhang ZW, Patchett SE, Perrett D, et al. Gastric mucosal and luminal beta-carotene concentrations in patients with chronic H pylori infection. Gut 1996;38(suppl 1):A5 [abstract W11].

4. Spirichev VB, Levachev MM, Rymarenko TV, et al. The effect of administration of beta-carotene in an oil solution on its blood serum level and antioxidant status of patients with duodenal ulcer and erosive gastritis. Vopr Med Khim 1992;38:44-7 [in Russian].

5. Tsubono Y, Okubo S, Hayashi M, et al. A randomized controlled trial for chemoprevention of gastric cancer in high-risk Japanese population; study design, feasibility and protocol modification. Jpn J Cancer Res 1997;88:344-9.

Age-Related Cognitive Decline
Dose: 50 mg every other day

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

In a double-blind trial, supplementation with beta-carotene in the amount of 50 mg every other day for 18 years appeared to slow the loss of cognitive function in middle-aged healthy males. Short-term supplementation (one year) was not beneficial.1

References

1. Grodstein F, Kang JH, Glynn RJ, et al. A randomized trial of beta carotene supplementation and cognitive function in men: the Physicians' Health Study II. Arch Intern Med 2007;167:2184-90.

Leukoplakia
Dose: 150,000 IU twice per week

Caution: Synthetic beta-carotene has been linked to increased risk of lung cancer in smokers. Until more is known, smokers should avoid all beta-carotene supplements.

Beta-carotene is the most widely used supplement in the treatment of leukoplakia. In a clinical trial of betel nut chewers with leukoplakia, supplementation with 150,000 IU of beta-carotene twice per week for six months significantly increased the remission rate compared with placebo (14.8% vs. 3.0%).1 The effectiveness of beta-carotene for treating leukoplakia was also confirmed in a double-blind trial that used 100,000 IU per day for six months.2 In one trial, supplementation with 33, 333 IU of beta-carotene per day, alone or combined with 50 IU of vitamin E, was reported not to reduce the incidence of leukoplakia.3 These results have also been observed in smaller trials.4, 5

Drug therapy with a synthetic, prescription form of vitamin A (known as Accutane, isotretinoin, and 13-cis retinoic acid) has been reported to be more effective than treatment with 50,000 IU per day of beta-carotene.6 However, because of the potential toxicity of the vitamin A-like drug, it may be preferable to treat leukoplakia with beta-carotene, which is much safer.

Before the research on beta-carotene was published, vitamin A was used to treat leukoplakia.7 One group of researchers reported that vitamin A (28,500 IU per day) was more effective than beta-carotene in treating people with leukoplakia.8 Another trial found that the combination of 150,000 IU per week of beta-carotene plus 100,000 IU per week of vitamin A led to a significant increase in remission time compared to beta carotene alone in betel nut chewers.9 Women who are or who could become pregnant should not take 100,000 IU of vitamin A per week without medical supervision.

References

1. Stich HF, Rosin MP, Hornby AP, et al. Remission of oral leukoplakias and micronuclei in tobacco/betel quid chewers treated with beta-carotene and with beta-carotene plus vitamin A. Int J Cancer 1988;42:195-9.

2. Garewal HS, Katz RV, Meyskens F, et al. beta-Carotene produces sustained remission in patients with oral leukoplakia. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 1999;125:1305-10.

3. Liede K, Hietanen J, Saxen L, et al. Long-term supplementation with alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene and prevalence of oral mucosal lesions in smokers. Oral Dis 1998;4:78-83.

4. Toma S, Benso S, Albanese E, et al. Treatment of oral leukoplakia with beta-carotene. Oncology 1992;49:77-81.

5. Garewal HS, Meyskens FL Jr, Killen D, et al. Response of oral leukoplakia to beta-carotene. J Clin Oncol 1990;8:1715-20.

6. Lippman SM, Batsakis JG, Toth BB, et al. Comparison of low-dose isotretinoin with beta carotene to prevent oral carcinogenesis. N Engl J Med 1993;328:15-20.

7. Johnson J, Ringsdorf W, Cheraskin E. Relationship of vitamin A and oral leukoplakia. Arch Derm 1963;88:607-12.

8. Stich HF, Mathews B, Sankaranarayanan R, Nair MK. Remission of precancerous lesions in the oral cavity of tobacco chewers and maintenance of the protective effect of beta-carotene or vitamin A. Am J Clin Nutr 1991;53:298S-304S.

9. Stich HF, Rosin MP, Hornby AP, et al. Remission of oral leukoplakias and micronuclei in tobacco/betel quid chewers treated with beta-carotene and with beta-carotene plus vitamin A. Int J Cancer 1988;42:195-9.

Beta-carotene is a substance from plants that the body converts into vitamin A. It also acts as an antioxidant and an immune system booster.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

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NAC MARKETINGNew Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®
 
3.7

(based on 9 reviews)

86%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

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  • Effective (6)
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    Reviewed by 9 customers

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    (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    I would buy this again

    By akapjr

    from Bethlehem,Pa

    About Me Budget Buyer

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    Pros

    • Easy To Use
    • Effective
    • Good Value

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      Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

      great product and price

      • My Beauty Routine Takes:
      • 30 Minutes

      (6 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

       
      1.0

      Worthless Beta Prostate

      By bruce826

      from Fresno

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      Pros

      • No pros

      Cons

      • Not Effective
      • Totally Worthless Product

      Best Uses

      • Dont Bother
      • Men

      Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

      Went through three bottles hoping for just a little help. Did nothing to stop frequent emptying of my bladder but did frequently empty my wallet.

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      • 10 Minutes

      (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      Works for me!

      By smith12240

      from North Huntingdon, PA

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        Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

        I was having problems with a weak urine flow. Since taking Super Beta Prostate the strength of my urine flow has returned to normal. I began noticing a change within the first week.

        (6 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        Noticed a difference within days

        By aldcoco

        from Corona, Calif

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          Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

          Was a great help with the acheing pain I would experience at the end of the day. Also had less trips to the bathroom at night. Was up 3 to 5 times a night. Now I either sleep through the night or am up once or twice during the night. I noticed a difference within a few days.

          (4 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          SUPER...Beta!!!

          By dsmith3613

          from Atlanta

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            • Daily Use

            Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

            Use as directed. I was seeking some treatments for prostatitis; and using this product along with cranberry juice, echinacea, saw palmetto and external message, have worked better than the antibotics that were previously prescribed. It was WELL worth it!!!

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            (7 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            I would recommend this product

            By rebeccadechert

            from Bolivar, Ohio

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                Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

                My husband has been using this product now for four weeks and has indicated good results. Prior he used to get up 2 to 4 times a night and he is now down to 1 to 2 times plus his urine flow is much improved. He was using a prescription drug before which he has now cancelled. As an aside, I purchased two bottles one month ago and noticed that there were only 59 capsules in each bottle. The lot number is 1212208. Has anyone else noticed this on their orders?

                (4 of 8 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                3.0

                Super Beta Prostate

                By mhetue

                from St. Petersburg Florida

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                • Good Value

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                  Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

                  I have only been using the product for a couple of weeks so i can't give a complete reveiw of how it is working for me. It seems to be working but not sure if that is just wishfull thinking on my part. I do know this at this time. For only two weeks it is working better than what the perscriptions that my Doctor purscribed for me. I have stopped taking the Doctors medication as it didn't work.

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                  (2 of 7 customers found this review helpful)

                   
                  4.0

                  Shows signs of working

                  By paulmock1

                  from Los Angeles, CA

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                  Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

                  Seems to be working but I've only been using it for 2 weeks.

                  (3 of 19 customers found this review helpful)

                   
                  3.0

                  Super Beta Prostate

                  By c_hennecy

                  from St. Louis, MO

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                    Comments about NAC MARKETING New Vitality® Super Beta Prostate®:

                    I haven't taken this product long enough to see any benefit at this point (1 week).

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