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Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme

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90 Tablets

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Description
  • Enzymes help to ease digestion, release vital nutrients and support a healthy digestive function.*
  • Papaya supplies the proteolytic enzyme papain, which aids in the digestion of proteins.*
  • Delicious chewable tablets.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

As a dietary supplement, chew three to nine tablets daily as desired.

Serving Size 3 Tablets
Servings Per Container 30
Amount Per Serving % DV
Calories 5.00
Total Carbohydrate 1.50 g 1%
Sugars 1.50 g
Papaya Fruit (Carica papaya) 45.00 mg **
Papain (60000 USP units) 6.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Sucrose, Dextrose, Artificial Color (FD&C Yellow #6), Protease 660 HUT, Natural and Artificial Flavors, Amylase 226 DU

No Preservatives, No Wheat, No Gluten, No Soy, No Dairy, Yeast Free

Storage Instructions: Store in a cool dry place.

Warning: After opening, keep tightly closed in refrigerator or other cool place.

Health Notes

Digestive Enzymes

Digestive Enzymes
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Sprains and Strains
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin, chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain
Proteolytic enzymes, including bromelain, may be helpful in healing sprains and strains because they are anti-inflammatory and appear to promote tissue healing.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin and chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain
Supplementing with a combination of the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin may improve low back pain.(more)
Tendinitis
Dose: Several tablets per day of proteolytic enzymes
Supplementing with digestive enzymes may reduce the severity of symptoms and speed healing.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Several trials have reported reduced pain and swelling, and/or faster healing in people with a variety of conditions who use papain.(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin and chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain
Supplementing with a combination of the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin may improve low back pain.(more)
Osteoarthritis
Dose: 90 mg of bromelain and 48 mg of trypsin, with 100 mg of rutosid, taken in enteric-coated pills three times per day
In one study, people with painful osteoarthritis of the knee who received an oral enzyme-flavonoid preparation saw more improvement in pain and joint function than those who took a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID).(more)
Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Several trials have reported reduced pain and swelling, and/or faster healing in people with a variety of conditions who use papain.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Lipase, a pancreatic enzyme, aids in the digestion of fats and may improve digestion in some people.(more)
Celiac Disease
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Some evidence suggests that enzyme supplements may be useful at the beginning of dietary treatment for this disease. (more)
Crohn's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Supplementing with enzymes might improve the nutrient malabsorption that is often associated with Crohn's disease.(more)
Pancreatic Insufficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified medical practitioner
Digestive enzymes are the mainstay of pancreatic insufficiency treatment and have been shown to reduce pain and steatorrhea associated with pancreatitis.(more)
Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Digestive enzymes inhibit the overgrowth of candida and prevent it from becoming established in the small intestine. (more)
Acne Rosacea
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Digestive enzymes have been reported anecdotally to improve rosacea symptoms.(more)
Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Digestive enzymes inhibit the overgrowth of candida and prevent it from becoming established in the small intestine. (more)
Allergies and Sensitivities and Food Allergies
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Proteolytic enzymes may theoretically reduce allergy symptoms by breaking down undigested protein to sizes that are too small to cause allergic reactions.(more)
Sprains and Strains
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin, chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain

Several preliminary trials have reported reduced pain and swelling, and/or faster healing in people with a variety of conditions using either bromelain,1 papain from papaya, 2, 3 or a combination of trypsin and chymotrypsin.4 Double-blind trials have reported faster recovery from athletic injuries, including sprains and strains, and earlier return to activity using eight tablets daily of trypsin/chymotrypsin,5, 6, 7, 8 four to eight tablets daily of papain,9 eight tablets of bromelain (single-blind only),10 or a combination of these enzymes.11 However, one double-blind trial using eight tablets per day of trypsin/chymotrypsin to treat sprained ankles found no significant effect on swelling, bruising, or overall function.12

Bromelain is measured in MCUs (milk clotting units) or GDUs (gelatin dissolving units). One GDU equals 1.5 MCU. Strong products contain at least 2,000 MCU (1,333 GDU) per gram (1,000 mg). A supplement containing 500 mg labeled "2,000 MCU per gram" would have 1,000 MCU of activity, because 500 mg is half a gram. Some doctors recommend 3,000 MCU taken three times per day for several days, followed by 2,000 MCU three times per day. Some of the research, however, uses smaller amounts, such as 2,000 MCU taken in divided amounts in the course of a day (500 MCU taken four times per day). Other enzyme preparations, such as trypsin/chymotrypsin, have different measuring units. Recommended use is typically two tablets four times per day on an empty stomach, but as with bromelain, the strength of trypsin/chymotrypsin tablets can vary significantly from product to product.

References

1. Cirelli MG. Five years experience with bromelains in therapy of edema and inflammation in postoperative tissue reaction, skin infections and trauma. Clin Med 1967;74(6):55-9.

2. Trickett P. Proteolytic enzymes in treatment of athletic injuries. Appl Ther 1964;6:647-52.

3. Sweeny FJ. Treatment of athletic injuries with an oral proteolytic enzyme. Med Times 1963:91:765.

4. Boyne PS, Medhurst H. Oral anti-inflammatory enzyme therapy in injuries in professional footballers. Practitioner 1967;198:543-6.

5. Deitrick RE. Oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of athletic injuries: A double-blind study. Pennsylvania Med J 1965;Oct:35-7.

6. Rathgeber WF. The use of proteolytic enzymes (Chymoral) in sporting injuries. S Afr Med J 1971;45:181-3.

7. Buck JE, Phillips N. Trial of Chymoral in professional footballers. Br J Clin Pract 1970;24:375-7.

8. Tsomides J, Goldberg RI. Controlled evaluation of oral chymotrypsin-trypsin treatment of injuries to the head and face. Clin Med 1969;76(11):40.

9. Holt HT. Carica papaya as ancillary therapy for athletic injuries. Curr Ther Res 1969;11:621-4.

10. Blonstein JL. Oral enzyme tablets in the treatment of boxing injuries. Practitioner 1967;198:547.

11. Baumuller M. Therapy of ankle joint distortions with hydrolytic enzymes-results from a double blind clinical trial. In Hermans GPH, Mosterd WL, eds. Sports, Medicine and Health. Amsterdam: Excerpta Medica, 1990, 1137.

12. Craig RP. The quantitative evaluation of the use of oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of sprained ankles. Injury 1975;6:313-6.

Low Back Pain
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin and chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain

Three double-blind trials have investigated the effects of supplementing a combination of the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin for seven to ten days on severe low back pain with or without accompanying leg pain. Eight tablets per day were given initially in all trials, but in two trials the number of pills was reduced to four per day after two to three days. One of these trials reported small, though statistically significant improvements, for some measures in people with degenerative arthritis of the lower spine.1 People with sciatica-type leg pain had significant improvement in several measures in one trial,2 while another found the enzymes were not much more effective than a placebo.3 These trials included chronic low back conditions, so their relevance to acute LBP alone may be limited.

References

1. Hingorani K. Oral enzyme therapy in severe back pain. Br J Clin Pract 1968;22:209-10.

2. Gaspardy G, Balint G, Mitsuova M, et al. Treatment of sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with Chymoral tablets. Rheum Phys Med 1971;11:14-9.

3. Gibson T, Dilke TFW, Grahame R. Chymoral in the treatment of lumbar disc prolapse. Rheumatol Rehabil 1975;14:186-90.

Tendinitis
Dose: Several tablets per day of proteolytic enzymes

Alternative healthcare practitioners frequently recommend proteolytic enzymes for various minor injuries. Research demonstrates that these enzymes are well absorbed when taken by mouth,1, 2 and preliminary3, 4, 5, 6 and double-blind7, 8, 9, 10 trials have shown their effectiveness for reducing pain and swelling associated with various injuries and for speeding up the healing process. Unfortunately, many of these studies did not specifically identify the patients' injury, so it is unclear whether the positive results included improvements in tendinitis.

References

1. Miller JM. The absorption of proteolytic enzymes from the gastrointestinal tract. Clin Med 1968;75:35-42 [review].

2. Castell JV, Friedrich G, Kuhn CS, et al. Intestinal absorption of undegraded proteins in men: presence of bromelain in plasma after oral intake. Am J Physiol 1997;273:G139-46.

3. Cirelli MG. Five years experience with bromelains in therapy of edema and inflammation in postoperative tissue reaction, skin infections and trauma. Clin Med 1967;74(6):55-9.

4. Trickett P. Proteolytic enzymes in treatment of athletic injuries. Appl Ther 1964;6:647-52.

5. Sweeny FJ. Treatment of athletic injuries with an oral proteolytic enzyme. Med Times 1963:91:765.

6. Boyne PS, Medhurst H. Oral anti-inflammatory enzyme therapy in injuries in professional footballers. Practitioner 1967;198:543-6.

7. Deitrick RE. Oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of athletic injuries: A double-blind study. Pennsylvania Med J 1965;Oct:35-7.

8. Holt HT. Carica papaya as ancillary therapy for athletic injuries. Curr Ther Res 1969;11:621-4.

9. Rathgeber WF. The use of proteolytic enzymes (Chymoral) in sporting injuries. S Afr Med J 1971;45:181-3.

10. Buck JE, Phillips N. Trial of Chymoral in professional footballers. Br J Clin Pract 1970;24:375-7.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Several preliminary trials have reported reduced pain and swelling, and/or faster healing in people with a variety of conditions using either bromelain,1 papain from papaya, 2, 3 or a combination of trypsin and chymotrypsin.4 Double-blind trials have reported faster recovery from athletic injuries, including sprains and strains, and earlier return to activity using eight tablets daily of trypsin/chymotrypsin,5, 6, 7, 8 four to eight tablets daily of papain,9 eight tablets of bromelain (single-blind only),10 or a combination of these enzymes.11 However, one double-blind trial using eight tablets per day of trypsin/chymotrypsin to treat sprained ankles found no significant effect on swelling, bruising, or overall function.12

References

1. Cirelli MG. Five years experience with bromelains in therapy of edema and inflammation in postoperative tissue reaction, skin infections and trauma. Clin Med 1967;74(6):55-9.

2. Trickett P. Proteolytic enzymes in treatment of athletic injuries. Appl Ther 1964;6:647-52.

3. Sweeny FJ. Treatment of athletic injuries with an oral proteolytic enzyme. Med Times 1963:91:765.

4. Boyne PS, Medhurst H. Oral anti-inflammatory enzyme therapy in injuries in professional footballers. Practitioner 1967;198:543-6.

5. Deitrick RE. Oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of athletic injuries: A double-blind study. Pennsylvania Med J 1965;Oct:35-7.

6. Rathgeber WF. The use of proteolytic enzymes (Chymoral) in sporting injuries. S Afr Med J 1971;45:181-3.

7. Buck JE, Phillips N. Trial of Chymoral in professional footballers. Br J Clin Pract 1970;24:375-7.

8. Tsomides J, Goldberg RI. Controlled evaluation of oral chymotrypsin-trypsin treatment of injuries to the head and face. Clin Med 1969;76(11):40.

9. Holt HT. Carica papaya as ancillary therapy for athletic injuries. Curr Ther Res 1969;11:621-4.

10. Blonstein JL. Oral enzyme tablets in the treatment of boxing injuries. Practitioner 1967;198:547.

11. Baumuller M. Therapy of ankle joint distortions with hydrolytic enzymes-results from a double blind clinical trial. In Hermans GPH, Mosterd WL, eds. Sports, Medicine and Health. Amsterdam: Excerpta Medica, 1990, 1137.

12. Craig RP. The quantitative evaluation of the use of oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of sprained ankles. Injury 1975;6:313-6.

Low Back Pain
Dose: 4 to 8 tablets a day of proteolytic enzymes containing trypsin and chymotrypsin, and/or bromelain

Three double-blind trials have investigated the effects of supplementing a combination of the enzymes trypsin and chymotrypsin for seven to ten days on severe low back pain with or without accompanying leg pain. Eight tablets per day were given initially in all trials, but in two trials the number of pills was reduced to four per day after two to three days. One of these trials reported small, though statistically significant improvements, for some measures in people with degenerative arthritis of the lower spine.1 People with sciatica-type leg pain had significant improvement in several measures in one trial,2 while another found the enzymes were not much more effective than a placebo.3 These trials included chronic low back conditions, so their relevance to acute LBP alone may be limited.

References

1. Hingorani K. Oral enzyme therapy in severe back pain. Br J Clin Pract 1968;22:209-10.

2. Gaspardy G, Balint G, Mitsuova M, et al. Treatment of sciatica due to intervertebral disc herniation with Chymoral tablets. Rheum Phys Med 1971;11:14-9.

3. Gibson T, Dilke TFW, Grahame R. Chymoral in the treatment of lumbar disc prolapse. Rheumatol Rehabil 1975;14:186-90.

Osteoarthritis
Dose: 90 mg of bromelain and 48 mg of trypsin, with 100 mg of rutosid, taken in enteric-coated pills three times per day

In a double-blind study, a group of people with painful osteoarthritis of the knee received an oral enzyme-flavonoid preparation or a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory (NSAID) for six weeks. While both treatments relieved pain and improved joint function, the enzyme-flavonoid product appeared to be slightly more effective than the NSAID. No serious side effects were seen.1 The enzyme-flavonoid product used in this study was Phlogenzym (Mucos Pharma, Geretsried, Germany). Each enteric-coated tablet contained 90 mg of bromelain, 48 mg of trypsin, and 100 mg of rutosid (a derivative of the flavonoid rutin); one tablet was given three times a day.

References

1. Akhtar NM, Naseer R, Farooqi AZ, et al. Oral enzyme combination versus diclofenac in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee - a double-blind prospective randomized study. Clin Rheumatol 2004;23:410-5.

Low Back Pain
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Several preliminary trials have reported reduced pain and swelling, and/or faster healing in people with a variety of conditions using either bromelain,1 papain from papaya, 2, 3 or a combination of trypsin and chymotrypsin.4 Double-blind trials have reported faster recovery from athletic injuries, including sprains and strains, and earlier return to activity using eight tablets daily of trypsin/chymotrypsin,5, 6, 7, 8 four to eight tablets daily of papain,9 eight tablets of bromelain (single-blind only),10 or a combination of these enzymes.11 However, one double-blind trial using eight tablets per day of trypsin/chymotrypsin to treat sprained ankles found no significant effect on swelling, bruising, or overall function.12

References

1. Cirelli MG. Five years experience with bromelains in therapy of edema and inflammation in postoperative tissue reaction, skin infections and trauma. Clin Med 1967;74(6):55-9.

2. Trickett P. Proteolytic enzymes in treatment of athletic injuries. Appl Ther 1964;6:647-52.

3. Sweeny FJ. Treatment of athletic injuries with an oral proteolytic enzyme. Med Times 1963:91:765.

4. Boyne PS, Medhurst H. Oral anti-inflammatory enzyme therapy in injuries in professional footballers. Practitioner 1967;198:543-6.

5. Deitrick RE. Oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of athletic injuries: A double-blind study. Pennsylvania Med J 1965;Oct:35-7.

6. Rathgeber WF. The use of proteolytic enzymes (Chymoral) in sporting injuries. S Afr Med J 1971;45:181-3.

7. Buck JE, Phillips N. Trial of Chymoral in professional footballers. Br J Clin Pract 1970;24:375-7.

8. Tsomides J, Goldberg RI. Controlled evaluation of oral chymotrypsin-trypsin treatment of injuries to the head and face. Clin Med 1969;76(11):40.

9. Holt HT. Carica papaya as ancillary therapy for athletic injuries. Curr Ther Res 1969;11:621-4.

10. Blonstein JL. Oral enzyme tablets in the treatment of boxing injuries. Practitioner 1967;198:547.

11. Baumuller M. Therapy of ankle joint distortions with hydrolytic enzymes-results from a double blind clinical trial. In Hermans GPH, Mosterd WL, eds. Sports, Medicine and Health. Amsterdam: Excerpta Medica, 1990, 1137.

12. Craig RP. The quantitative evaluation of the use of oral proteolytic enzymes in the treatment of sprained ankles. Injury 1975;6:313-6.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Lipase, a pancreatic enzyme, aids in the digestion of fats and may improve digestion in some people. In a double-blind trial, a timed-release form of pancreatic enzymes was shown to significantly reduce gas, bloating, and fullness after a high-fat meal.1 Participants in this study took one capsule immediately before the meal and two capsules immediately after the meal. The three capsules together provided 30,000 USP units of lipase, 112,500 USP units of protease, and 99,600 USP units of amylase. However, the amount of pancreatic enzymes needed may vary from person to person, and should be determined with the help of a doctor.

References

1. Suarez F, Levitt MD, Adshead J, Barkin JS. Pancreatic supplements reduce symptomatic response of healthy subjects to a high fat meal. Dig Dis Sci 1999;44:1317-21.

Celiac Disease
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

People with celiac disease often do not produce adequate digestive secretions from the pancreas, including lipase enzymes1 In a double-blind trial, children with celiac disease who received a pancreatic enzyme supplement along with a gluten-free diet gained significantly more weight in the first month than those treated with only a gluten-free diet.2 However, this benefit disappeared in the second month, suggesting enzyme supplements may only be useful at the beginning of dietary treatment.

References

1. Patel RS, Johlin FC Jr, Murray JA. Celiac disease and recurrent pancreatitis. Gastrointest Endosc 1999;50:823-7.

2. Carroccio A, Iacono G, Montalto G, et al. Pancreatic enzyme therapy in childhood celiac disease. A double-blind prospective randomized study. Dig Dis Sci 1995;40:2555-60.

Crohn's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

People with Crohn's disease may be deficient in pancreatic enzymes, including lipase.1 In theory, supplementing with enzymes might improve the nutrient malabsorption that is often associated with Crohn's disease. However, people with Crohn's disease considering supplementation with enzymes should consult a doctor.

References

1. Hegnhoj J, Hansen CP, Rannem T, et al. Pancreatic function in Crohn's disease. Gut 1990;31:1076-9.

Pancreatic Insufficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified medical practitioner

The mainstay of treatment for pancreatic insufficiency is replacement of digestive enzymes, using supplements prepared from pig pancreas (pancrelipase) or fungi.1 Enzyme supplements have been shown to reduce steatorrhea2, 3 associated with pancreatitis, while pain reduction has been demonstrated in some,4, 5 though not all,6, 7 double-blind studies. Digestive enzyme preparations that are resistant to the acidity of the stomach are effective at lower doses compared with conventional digestive enzyme preparations.8 Some enzyme preparations are produced with higher lipase enzyme content for improved fat absorption, but one controlled study of chronic pancreatitis found no advantage of this preparation over one with standard lipase content.9 People with more severe pancreatic insufficiency or who attempt to eat a higher-fat diet require more enzymes,10 but large amounts of pancreatic digestive enzymes are known to damage the large intestine in some people with diseases causing pancreatic insufficiency.11, 12, 13 Therefore, a qualified healthcare practitioner should be consulted about the appropriate and safe amount of enzymes to use.

Many otherwise healthy people suffer from indigestion, and some doctors believe that mild pancreatic insufficiency can be a cause of indigestion. A preliminary study of people with indigestion reported significant improvement in almost all of those given pancreatic enzyme supplements.14 One double-blind trial found that giving pancreatic enzymes to healthy people along with a high-fat meal reduced bloating, gas, and abdominal fullness following the meal.15

Stomach surgery patients often have decreased pancreatic function, malabsorption, and abdominal symptoms, including steatorrhea, but digestive enzyme supplementation had no effect on steatorrhea in two of three double-blind studies of stomach surgery patients,16, 17, 18 although some other symptoms did improve.19, 20 Patients who have surgery to remove part of the pancreas often have severe steatorrhea that is difficult to control with enzyme supplements.21 In one double-blind study, neither high-dose nor standard-dose pancreatin was able to eliminate steatorrhea in over half of the pancreas surgery patients studied.22

References

1. Scolapio JS, Malhi-Chowla N, Ukleja A. Nutrition supplementation in patients with acute and chronic pancreatitis. Gastroenterol Clin North Am 1999;28:695-707 [review].

2. Nakamura T, Tandoh Y, Terada A, et al. Effects of high-lipase pancreatin on fecal fat, neutral sterol, bile acid, and short-chain fatty acid excretion in patients with pancreatic insufficiency resulting from chronic pancreatitis. Int J Pancreatol 1998;23:63-70.

3. Schneider MU, Knoll-Ruzicka ML, Domshke S, et al. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy: comparative effects of conventional and enteric-coated microspheric pancreatin and acid-stable fungal enzyme preparations on steatorrhea in chronic pancreatitis. Hepatogastroenterology 1985;32:97-102.

4. Isaksson G, Ihse I. Pain reduction by an oral pancreatic enzyme preparation in chronic pancreatitis. DigDis Sci 1983;28:97-102.

5. Slaff J, Jacobson D, Tillman CR, et al. Protease-specific suppression of pancreatic exocrine secretion. Gastroenterol 1984;87:44-52.

6. Halgreen H, Pedersen NT, Worning H. Symptomatic effect of pancreatic enzyme therapy in patients with chronic pancreatitis. Scand J Gastroenterol 1986;21:104-8.

7. Mossner J. Is there a place for pancreatic enzymes in the treatment of pain in chronic pancreatitis? Digestion 1993;54 Suppl 2:35-9.

8. Schneider MU, Knoll-Ruzicka ML, Domshke S, et al. Pancreatic enzyme replacement therapy: comparative effects of conventional and enteric-coated microspheric pancreatin and acid-stable fungal enzyme preparations on steatorrhea in chronic pancreatitis. Hepatogastroenterology 1985;32:97-102.

9. Dellhaye M, Meuris S, Gohimont AC, et al. Comparative evaluation of a high lipase pancreatic enzyme preparation and a standard pancreatic supplement for treating exocrine pancreatic insufficiency in chronic pancreatitis. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 1996;8:699-703.

10. Malesci A, Mariani A, Mezzi G, et al. New enteric-coated high-lipase pancreatic extract in the treatment of pancreatic steatorrhea. J Clin Gastroenterol 1994;18:32-5.

11. Bansi DS, Price A, Russell C, Sarner M. Fibrosing colonopathy in an adult owing to over use of pancreatic enzyme supplements. Gut 2000;46:283-5.

12. Littlewood JM, Wolfe SP. Control of malabsorption in cystic fibrosis. Paediatr Drugs 2000;2:205-22.

13. Borowitz DS, Grand RJ, Durie PR. Use of pancreatic enzyme supplements for patients with cystic fibrosis in the context of fibrosing colonopathy. Consensus committee. J Pediatr 1995;127:681-4.

14. Cruz Pinho A. Dispepsia e terapeutica enzimatica de substituicao. Cadernos Generalista (Lisboa) 1990;78:43-47 [in Portugese].

15. Suarez F, Levitt MD, Adshead J, Barkin JS. Pancreatic supplements reduce symptomatic response of healthy subjects to a high fat meal. Dig Dis Sci 1999;44:1317-21.

16. Bragelmann R, Armbrecht U, Rosemeyer D, et al. The effect of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in patients with steatorrhea after total gastrectomy. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 1999;11:231-7.

17. Armbrecht U, Lundell L, Stockbruegger RW. Nutrient malassimilation after total gastrectomy and possible intervention. Digestion 1987;37 Suppl 1:56-60.

18. Armbrecht U, Lundell L, Stockbrugger RW. The benefit of pancreatic enzyme substitution after total gastrectomy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1988;2:493-500.

19. Armbrecht U, Lundell L, Stockbrugger RW. The benefit of pancreatic enzyme substitution after total gastrectomy. Aliment Pharmacol Ther 1988;2:493-500.

20. Bragelmann R, Armbrecht U, Rosemeyer D, et al. The effect of pancreatic enzyme supplementation in patients with steatorrhea after total gastrectomy. Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 1999;11:231-7.

21. Ghaneh P, Neoptolemos JP. Exocrine pancreatic function following pancreatectomy. Ann N Y Acad Sci 1999;880:308-18 [review].

22. Neoptolemos JP, Ghaneh P, Andren-Sandberg A, et al. Treatment of pancreatic exocrine insufficiency after pancreatic resection. Results of a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study of high vs standard dose pancreatin. Int J Pancreatol 1999;25:171-80.

Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

It is unknown if taking pancreatic enzymes or betaine HCl (hydrochloric acid) tablets is beneficial for chronic candidiasis. Nonetheless, some doctors recommend improving digestive secretions with these agents. Hydrochloric-acid secretion from the stomach, pancreatic enzymes, and bile all inhibit the overgrowth of Candida and prevent its penetration into the absorptive surfaces of the small intestine.1, 2, 3 Decreased secretion of any of these important digestive components can lead to overgrowth of Candida in the gastrointestinal tract. Consult a physician for more information.

References

1. Boero M, Pera A, Andriulli A, et al. Candida overgrowth in gastric juice of peptic ulcer subjects on short- and long-term treatment with H2-receptor antagonists. Digestion 1983;28:158-63.

2. Rubinstein E. Antibacterial activity of the pancreatic fluid. Gastroenterology 1985;88:927-32 [review].

3. Sarker SA, Gyr R. Non-immunological defense mechanisms of the gut. Gut 1990;33:1331-7 [review].

Acne Rosacea
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Some people with rosacea have been reported to produce inadequate stomach acid.1 In a preliminary trial, supplemental hydrochloric acid, along with vitamin B complex, improved some cases of rosacea in people with low stomach-acid production.2 Similarly, improvement in rosacea has been reported anecdotally after supplementation with pancreatic digestive enzymes, and a controlled study found that rosacea patients produced less pancreatic lipase than healthy people.3 Controlled trials are needed to evaluate the effects of hydrochloric acid and digestive enzyme supplements in rosacea. Hydrochloric acid supplements should not be taken without the supervision of a healthcare practitioner.

References

1. Johnson L, Eckardt R. Rosacea keratitis and conditions with vascularization of the cornea treated with riboflavin. Arch Ophthamol 1940;23:899-907.

2. Allison JR. The relation of hydrochloric acid and vitamin B complex deficiency in certain skin diseases. South Med J 1945;38:235-41.

3. Barba A, Rosa B, Angelini G, et al. Pancreatic exocrine function in rosacea. Dermatologica 1982;165:601-6.

Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

It is unknown if taking pancreatic enzymes or betaine HCl (hydrochloric acid) tablets is beneficial for chronic candidiasis. Nonetheless, some doctors recommend improving digestive secretions with these agents. Hydrochloric-acid secretion from the stomach, pancreatic enzymes, and bile all inhibit the overgrowth of Candida and prevent its penetration into the absorptive surfaces of the small intestine.1, 2, 3 Decreased secretion of any of these important digestive components can lead to overgrowth of Candida in the gastrointestinal tract. Consult a physician for more information.

References

1. Boero M, Pera A, Andriulli A, et al. Candida overgrowth in gastric juice of peptic ulcer subjects on short- and long-term treatment with H2-receptor antagonists. Digestion 1983;28:158-63.

2. Rubinstein E. Antibacterial activity of the pancreatic fluid. Gastroenterology 1985;88:927-32 [review].

3. Sarker SA, Gyr R. Non-immunological defense mechanisms of the gut. Gut 1990;33:1331-7 [review].

Allergies and Sensitivities and Food Allergies
Dose: Refer to label instructions

According to one theory, allergies are triggered by partially undigested protein. Proteolytic enzymes may reduce allergy symptoms by further breaking down undigested protein to sizes that are too small to cause allergic reactions.1 Preliminary human evidence supports this theory.2Hydrochloric acid secreted by the stomach also helps the digestion of protein, and preliminary research suggests that some people with allergies may not produce adequate amounts of stomach acid.3, 4, 5 However, no controlled trials have investigated the use of enzyme supplements to improve digestion as a treatment for food allergies.

References

1. Oelgoetz AW, Oelgoetz PA, Wittenkind J. The treatment of food allergy and indigestion of pancreatic origin with pancreatic enzymes. Am J Dig Dis Nutr 1935;2:422-6.

2. McCann M. Pancreatic enzyme supplement for treatment of multiple food allergies. Ann Allergy 1993;71:269 [abstract #17].

3. Kokkonen J, Simila S, Herva R. Impaired gastric function in children with cow's milk intolerance. Eur J Pediatr 1979;132:1-6.

4. Kokkonen J, Simila S, Herva R. Gastrointestinal findings in atopic children. Eur J Pediatr 1980;134:249-54.

5. Gonzalez H, Ahmed T. Suppression of gastric H2-receptor mediated function in patients with bronchial asthma and ragweed allergy. Chest 1986;89:491-6.

Digestive enzymes are complex proteins involved in digestion that stimulate chemical changes in other substances. They work optimally at specific temperature and pH. Digestive enzymes include pancreatic enzymes, plant-derived enzymes, and fungal-derived enzymes. There are three classes of digestive enzymes: proteolytic enzymes needed to digest protein, lipases needed to digest fat, and amylases needed to digest carbohydrates.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
GNC NATURAL BRANDNatural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme
 
3.7

(based on 6 reviews)

60%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Effective (3)
  • Good taste (3)
  • Good value (3)
  • No side effects (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Daily use (3)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Health conscious (3)

    Reviewed by 6 customers

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    4.0

    i would buy this again

    By lorenzo881

    from pittsburgh PA

    About Me Work Out Regularly

    See all my reviews

    Pros

    • Good Value
    • Tastes Good

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Everyday Use

      Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

      these are just plain good!

      (4 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

       
      2.0

      Not effective for bloating and gas

      By paigesydney

      from pittsburgh pa

      About Me Health Conscious

      See all my reviews

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Good Taste
      • No Side Effects

      Cons

      • Not Effective

      Best Uses

        Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

        I was hoping this would help me digest protein better to relieve bloating and gas. It did nothing. It tastes like candy though, so if you want to waste your money on expensive candy, buy this!

        (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        Taste great

        By jyousey

        from Anchorage, AK

        About Me First Time User

        See all my reviews

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Effective
        • Good Taste
        • Good Value
        • No Side Effects

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Daily Use

          Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

          I like this and I got my mom to take it too

          (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

           
          4.0

          It really works

          By marytaylor13

          from Lino Lakes, MN

          About Me Health Conscious

          See all my reviews

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Effective
          • Good Taste
          • Good Value
          • No Side Effects

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Daily Use
            • Preventative

            Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

            I take this product after eating. It eliminates gas without the side effects.It's not as tasty as it was a few years ago.

            (2 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

             
            2.0

            Artificial colors and flavors

            By anuroopa_s

            from Jersey City, NJ

            About Me First Time User, Health Conscious

            See all my reviews

            Pros

              Cons

              • Artificial colors
              • Artificial flavors

              Best Uses

              • Daily Use

              Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

              Initially bought the papaya enzymes for relieving insect bites, but since these contain added sugars could not use it for that purpose.

              Since I also have GERD issues, am making a point to take it every day with meals. However, not really sure to take it before or after meal. I appreciate that it has none of the other allergens (gluten, soy, wheat, dairy, etc.). But I question the need to add artificial colors and flavors. The sugars I don't mind (they could be part of the actual papaya).

              (6 of 10 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              This is a good product to keep at hand.

              By loosy2

              from Arkansas

              About Me Budget Buyer

              See all my reviews

              Pros

              • Easy To Use
              • Effective
              • Good Smell
              • Tastes good

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • On-the-go
                • Whenever needed

                Comments about GNC NATURAL BRAND Natural Brand™ Papaya Enzyme:

                This can take the place of an antacid for me.

                • My Beauty Routine Takes:
                • 10 Minutes

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