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Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™

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Description
Odorless Organic Garlic Supplement

Kyolic® Aged Garlic Extract™
Original Formula
CARDIOVASCULAR*
FORMULA
100

Kyolic® Aged Garlic Extract™ begins with 100% organically† grown garlic bulbs. They are then aged to perfection in a unique extraction process to eliminate odor and create beneficial compounds found only in Kyolic. This formula supports your cardiovascular system by maintaining circulatory function and overall heart health.*

Take the best--Kyolic Aged Garlic Extract, the most scientifically researched, highest quality and best-selling odorless Sociable Garlic®.

(† In compliance with the California Organic Food Act of 1990)

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

SUGGESTED USE: Take two or more capsules with a meal twice daily.

Serving Size 2 Capsules
Servings Per Container 100
Amount Per Serving % DV
Aged Garlic Extract™ Powder (bulb) 600.00 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Whey, Magnesium Stearate (Vegetable Source), Whey derived from milk

No Sodium, No Yeast, No Preservatives, No Sugar, No Gluten, No Artificial Color, No Artificial Flavors

Storage Instructions: Store in a cool dry place with cap on tight.

Warning: Consult your physician prior to using this product it you are pregnant, nursing, taking medication, under 18 years of age or have a medical condition. Discontinue use two weeks prior to surgery.KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Do not use if cap drop ring or inner seal is broken or missing.


Manufactured by:
WAKUNAGA OF AMERICA CO., LTD.
MISSION VIEJO, CA 92691

Health Notes

Garlic

Garlic
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Atherosclerosis
Dose: 900 mg daily of a powder standardized for 0.6% allicin
Garlic has been shown to slow down the process of the arteries hardening. Aged garlic extract has been shown to prevent oxidation of LDL ("bad") cholesterol, a significant factor in atherosclerosis development. (more)
High Cholesterol
Dose: 600 to 900 mg a day of a standardized herbal extract
Taking garlic may help lower cholesterol and prevent hardening of the arteries.(more)
High Triglycerides
Dose: 600 to 900 mg daily of a concentrate standardized for 5,000 to 6,000 mcg of allicin
Supplementing with garlic may help keep triglyceride levels in check.(more)
Hypertension
Dose: 600 to 900 mg of a daily herbal extract
Taking garlic may improve heart and blood vessel health and may help lower blood pressure.(more)
Intermittent Claudication
Dose: 400 mg of a standardized extract twice per day
In one study, people given a garlic powder extract could walk a significantly greater distance than those given a placebo.(more)
Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Follow label instructions to take a product containing stabilized allicin
In one study, taking garlic during the winter months reduced the occurrence and duration of colds.(more)
Influenza
Dose: 2.6 grams per day
Healthy volunteers who supplemented with an aged-garlic extract for 90 days decreased the number of days on which severe cold or influenza symptoms occurred by 58%.(more)
Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic is an herb that directly attack microbes.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic may help combat opportunistic infections. In one trial, an aged garlic extract reduced the number of infections and relieved diarrhea in a group of patients with AIDS.(more)
Parasites
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic has been shown to kill parasites, including amoeba and hookworm, in test tubes and in animals. Other studies support the use of garlic to treat roundworm, pinworm, and hookworm.(more)
Warts
Dose: Rub cut clove onto area nightly and cover until morning, or apply oil-soluble extract twice per day
Studies have shown topically applied garlic to be effective at clearing common warts.(more)
Athlete's Foot
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The compound ajoene, found in garlic, is an antifungal agent that has been shown to be effective against athlete's foot. Crushed, raw garlic applied topically may also be effective.(more)
Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
Dose: 1 ml aged extract per 2.2 lbs (1 kg) of body weight daily
A special garlic extract (Kastamonu Garlic) reduced prostate size and significantly improved urinary symptoms in one study.(more)
Peptic Ulcer
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic has been reported to have anti-Helicobacter activity in test-tube studies and may be helpful for peptic ulcers.(more)
Ear Infections
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Ear drops with mullein, St. John's wort, and garlic in an oil or glycerin base are traditional remedies used to alleviate symptoms, particularly pain, during acute ear infections.(more)
Ear Infections
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Ear drops with mullein, St. John's wort, and garlic in an oil or glycerin base are traditional remedies used to alleviate symptoms, particularly pain, during acute ear infections.(more)
Breast-Feeding Support
Dose: Follow label instructions
Infants have been shown in some studies to nurse longer when their mothers ate garlic. However, some infants may develop colic from garlic in breast milk.(more)
Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic has been shown to have significant anti-Candida activity.(more)
Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Garlic has been shown to have significant anti-Candida activity.(more)
Atherosclerosis
Dose: 900 mg daily of a powder standardized for 0.6% allicin

Garlic has been shown to prevent atherosclerosis in a four-year double-blind trial.1 The preparation used, standardized for 0.6% allicin content, provided 900 mg of garlic powder per day. The people in this trial were 50 to 80 years old, and the benefits were most notable in women. This trial points to the long-term benefits of garlic to both prevent and possibly slow the progression of atherosclerosis in people at risk.

Garlic has also lowered cholesterol levels in double-blind research,2 though more recently, some double-blind trials have not found garlic to be effective.3, 4, 5 Some of the negative trials have flaws in their design.6 Nonetheless, the relationship between garlic and cholesterol-lowering is somewhat unclear.7

Garlic has also been shown to prevent excessive platelet adhesion (stickiness) in humans.8 Allicin, often considered the main active component of garlic, is not alone in this action. The constituent known as ajoene has also shown beneficial effects on platelets.9 Aged garlic extract, but not raw garlic, has been shown, to prevent oxidation of LDL cholesterol in humans,10 an event believed to be a significant factor in the development of atherosclerosis.

Garlic and ginkgo also decrease excessive blood coagulation. Both have been shown in double-blind11 and other controlled12 trials to decrease the overactive coagulation of blood that may contribute to atherosclerosis.

Numerous medicinal plants and plant compounds have demonstrated an ability to protect LDL cholesterol from being damaged by free radicals. Garlic,13 ginkgo,14 and guggul15 are of particular note in this regard. Garlic and ginkgo have been most convincingly shown to protect LDL cholesterol in humans.

References

1. Koscienlny J, Klubetaendorf D, Latza R, et al. The anti-atherosclerotic effect of Allium sativum. Atherosclerosis 1999;144:237-49.

2. Neil HA, Silagy CA, Lancaster T, et al. Garlic powder in the treatment of moderate hyperlipidaemia: A controlled trial and a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys 1996;30:329-34.

3. McCrindle BW, Helden E, Conner WT. Garlic extract therapy in children with hypercholesterolemia. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1998;152:1089-94.

4. Isaacsohn JL, Moser M, Stein EA, et al. Garlic powder and plasma lipids and lipoproteins. Arch Intern Med 1998;158:1189-94.

5. Berthold HK, Sudhop T, von Bergmann K. Effect of a garlic oil preparation on serum lipoproteins and cholesterol metabolism. JAMA 1998;279:1900-2.

6. Lawson L. Garlic oil for hypercholesterolemia-negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall 1998;185-6.

7. Lawson LD. Garlic powder for hyperlipidemia-analysis of recent negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall, 1998;187-9.

8. Kiesewetter H, Jung F, Pindur G, et al. Effect of garlic on thrombocyte aggregation, microcirculation and other risk factors. Int J Pharm Ther Toxicol 1991;29(4):151-5.

9. Srivastava KC, Tyagi OD. Effect of a garlic derived principle (ajoene) on aggregation and arachidonic acid metabolism in human blood platelets. Prostagl Leukotr Ess Fatty Acids 1993;49:587-95.

10. Munday JS, James KA, Fray LM, et al. Daily supplementation with aged garlic extract, but not raw garlic, protects low density lipoprotein against in vitro oxidation. Atherosclerosis 1999;143:399-404.

11. Kiesewetter H, Jung F, Mrowietz C, et al. Effects of garlic on blood fluidity and fibrinolytic activity: A randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind study. Br J Clin Pract Suppl 1990;69:24-9.

12. Jung F, Mrowietz C, Kiesewetter H, Wenzel E. Effect of Ginkgo biloba on fluidity of blood and peripheral microcirculation in volunteers. Arzneimittelforschung 1990;40:589-93.

13. Phelps S, Harris WS. Garlic supplementation and lipoprotein oxidation susceptibility. Lipids 1993;28(5):475-7.

14. Yan LJ, Droy-Lefaix MT, Packer L. Ginkgo biloba extract (EGb 761) protects human low density lipoproteins against oxidative modification mediated by copper. Biochem Biophys Res Comm 1995;212:360-6.

15. Singh K, Chander R, Kapoor NK. Guggulsterone, a potent hypolipidaemic, prevents oxidation of low density lipoprotein. Phytother Res 1997;11:291-4.

High Cholesterol
Dose: 600 to 900 mg a day of a standardized herbal extractReports on many double-blind garlic trials performed through 1998 suggested that cholesterol was lowered by an average of 9 to 12% and triglycerides by 8 to 27% over a one-to-four month period.1, 2, 3 Most of these trials used 600 to 900 mg per day of garlic supplements. More recently, however, several double-blind trials have found garlic to have minimal success in lowering cholesterol and triglycerides.4, 5, 6, 7, 8 One negative trial has been criticized for using a steam-distilled garlic "oil" that has no track record for this purpose,9 while the others used the same standardized garlic products as the previous positive trials. Based on these findings, the use of garlic should not be considered a primary approach to lowering high cholesterol and triglycerides.10Part of the confusion may result from differing effects from dissimilar garlic products. In most but not all trials, aged garlic extracts and garlic oil (both containing no allicin) have not lowered cholesterol levels in humans.11, 12 Therefore, neither of these supplements can be recommended at this time for cholesterol lowering. Odor-controlled, enteric-coated tablets standardized for allicin content are available and, in some trials, appear more promising.13 Doctors typically recommend 900 mg per day (providing 5,000 to 6,000 mcg of allicin), divided into two or three admininstrations.
References

1. Warshafsky S, Kamer R, Sivak S. Effect of garlic on total serum cholesterol: A meta-analysis. Ann Int Med 1993;119(7)599-605.

2. Silagy C, Neil A. Garlic as a lipid-lowering agent-a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys London 1994;28(1):39-45.

3. Neil HA, Silagy CA, Lancaster T, et al. Garlic powder in the treatment of moderate hyperlipidaemia: A controlled trial and a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys 1996;30:329-34.

4. Gardner CD, Lawson LD, Block E, et al. Effect of raw garlic vs commercial garlic supplements on plasma lipid concentrations in adults with moderate hypercholesterolemia: a randomized clinical trial. Arch Intern Med 2007;167:346-53.

5. McCrindle BW, Helden E, Conner WT. Garlic extract therapy in children with hypercholesterolemia. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1998;152:1089-94.

6. Isaacsohn JL, Moser M, Stein EA, et al. Garlic powder and plasma lipids and lipoproteins. Arch Intern Med 1998;158:1189-94.

7. Berthold HK, Sudhop T, von Bergmann K. Effect of a garlic oil preparation on serum lipoproteins and cholesterol metabolism. JAMA 1998;279:1900-2.

8. Superko HR, Krauss RM. Garlic powder, effect on plasma lipids, postprandial lipemia, low-density lipoprotein particle size, high-density lipoprotein subclass distribution and lipoprotein(a). J Am Coll Cardiol 2000;35:321-6.

9. Lawson L. Garlic oil for hypercholesterolemia-negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall 1998;185-6.

10. Lawson LD. Garlic powder for hyperlipidemia-analysis of recent negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall, 1998;187-9.

11. Berthold HK, Sudhop T, von Bergmann K. Effect of a garlic oil preparation on serum lipoproteins and cholesterol metabolism. JAMA 1998;279:1900-2.

12. Silagy C, Neil A. Garlic as a lipid-lowering agent-a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys London 1994;28(1):39-45.

13. Silagy C, Neil A. Garlic as a lipid-lowering agent-a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys London 1994;28(1):39-45.

High Triglycerides
Dose: 600 to 900 mg daily of a concentrate standardized for 5,000 to 6,000 mcg of allicin

Reports on many clinical trials of garlic performed until 1998 suggested that triglycerides were lowered by an average of 8-27% and cholesterol by 9-12% over a one- to four-month period.1, 2, 3 Most of these trials used 600-900 mg per day of a garlic supplement standardized to alliin content and allicin potential. More recently, however, three double-blind clinical trials have found garlic to have minimal success in lowering triglycerides and cholesterol.4, 5, 6 One negative trial has been criticized for using a steam distilled garlic "oil" that has no track record for this purpose,7 while the others used the same standardized garlic products as the previous positive clinical trials. Based on these findings, the use of garlic should not be considered a primary approach to lowering high triglycerides and cholesterol.8

Odor-controlled, enteric-coated garlic tablets standardized for allicin content can be taken in the amount of 900 mg daily (providing 5,000-6,000 mcg of allicin), divided into two or three daily portions.

References

1. Warshafsky S, Kamer R, Sivak S. Effect of garlic on total serum cholesterol: A meta-analysis. Ann Int Med 1993;119(7)599-605.

2. Silagy C, Neil A. Garlic as a lipid-lowering agent-a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys London 1994;28(1):39-45.

3. Neil HA, Silagy CA, Lancaster T, et al. Garlic powder in the treatment of moderate hyperlipidaemia: A controlled trial and a meta-analysis. J R Coll Phys 1996;30:329-34.

4. McCrindle BW, Helden E, Conner WT. Garlic extract therapy in children with hypercholesterolemia. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 1998;152:1089-94.

5. Isaacsohn JL, Moser M, Stein EA, et al. Garlic powder and plasma lipids and lipoproteins. Arch Intern Med 1998;158:1189-94.

6. Berthold HK, Sudhop T, von Bergmann K. Effect of a garlic oil preparation on serum lipoproteins and cholesterol metabolism. JAMA 1998;279:1900-2.

7. Lawson L. Garlic oil for hypercholesterolemia-negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall 1998;185-6.

8. Lawson LD. Garlic powder for hyperlipidemia-analysis of recent negative results. Quart Rev Natural Med Fall, 1998;187-9.

Hypertension
Dose: 600 to 900 mg of a daily herbal extract

Garlic has a mild blood pressure-lowering effect, according to an analysis of ten double-blind trials.1 All of these trials administered garlic for at least four weeks, typically using 600-900 mg of garlic extract per day. Onion-closely related to garlic-may also have a mild blood pressure-lowering effect, according to preliminary research.2

References

1. Silagy CA, Neil HA. A meta-analysis of the effect of garlic on blood pressure. J Hyperten 1994;12:463-8.

2. Louria DB, McAnally JF, Lasser N, et al. Onion extract in treatment of hypertension and hyperlipidemia: A preliminary communication. Curr Ther Res 1985;37:127-31.

Intermittent Claudication
Dose: 400 mg of a standardized extract twice per day

A standardized extract of garlic has been tested as a treatment for intermittent claudication. In a double-blind trial, the increase in walking distance was significantly greater in people receiving garlic powder extract (400 mg twice per day for 12 weeks) than in those given a placebo.1

References

1. Kiesewetter H, Jung F, Jung EM, et al. Effects of garlic coated tablets in peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Clin Investig 1993;71:383-6.

Common Cold and Sore Throat
Dose: Follow label instructions to take a product containing stabilized allicin

In a double-blind trial, participants took one capsule per day of a placebo or a garlic supplement that contained stabilized allicin (the amount of garlic per capsule was not specified) for 12 weeks between November and February. During that time, the garlic group had 63% fewer colds and 70% fewer days ill than did the placebo group.1 In another double-blind study of healthy volunteers, supplementing with 2.6 grams per day of an aged-garlic extract for 90 days decreased by 58% the number of days on which severe cold or influenza symptoms occurred.2

References

1. Josling P. Preventing the common cold with a garlic supplement: a double-blind, placebo-controlled survey. Adv Ther2001;18:189-93.

2. Nantz MP, Rowe CA, Muller CE, et al. Supplementation with aged garlic extract improves both NK and ??-T cell function and reduces the severity of cold and flu symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled nutrition intervention. Clin Nutr 2012;31:337-44.

Influenza
Dose: 2.6 grams per dayIn a double-blind study of healthy volunteers, supplementing with 2.6 grams per day of an aged-garlic extract for 90 days decreased by 58% the number of days on which severe cold or influenza symptoms occurred.1
References

1. Nantz MP, Rowe CA, Muller CE, et al. Supplementation with aged garlic extract improves both NK and ??-T cell function and reduces the severity of cold and flu symptoms: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled nutrition intervention. Clin Nutr 2012;31:337-44.

Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Herbs that directly attack microbes include the following: chaparral, eucalyptus, garlic, green tea, lemon balm (antiviral), lomatium, myrrh, olive leaf, onion, oregano, pau d'arco (antifungal), rosemary, sage, sandalwood, St. John's wort, tea tree oil, thyme, and usnea.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Garlic may assist in combating opportunistic infections. In one trial, administration of an aged garlic extract reduced the number of infections and relieved diarrhea in a group of patients with AIDS.1 Garlic's active constituents have also been shown to kill HIV in the test tube, though these results have not been confirmed in human trials.2

References

1. Abdullah TH, Kirkpatrick DV, Carter J. Enhancement of natural killer cell activity in AIDS with garlic. Dtsch Zschr Onkol 1989;21:52-3.

2. Shoji S, Furuishi K, Yanase R, et al. Allyl compounds selectively killed human immunodeficiency virus (type 1)-infected cells. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 1993;194:610-21.

Parasites
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Garlic has been demonstrated to kill parasites, including amoeba1 and hookworm,2 in test tubes and in animals. Older studies in humans support the use of garlic to treat roundworm, pinworm, and hookworm.3 However, due to a lack of clinical trials, the amount of garlic needed to treat intestinal parasites in humans is not known.

References

1. Mirelman D, Monheit D, Varon S. Inhibition of growth of Entamoeba histolytica by allicin, the active principle of garlic extract (Allium sativum). J Infect Dis 1987;156:243-4.

2. Bastidas CJ. Effect of ingested garlic on Necator americanus and Ancylostoma caninum. Am J Trop Med Hyg 1969;13:920-3.

3. Koch HP, Lawson LD, eds. Garlic: The Science and Therapeutic Application of Allium sativum L. and Related Species. Baltimore: Williams & Wilkins, 1996, 173-4.

Warts
Dose: Rub cut clove onto area nightly and cover until morning, or apply oil-soluble extract twice per day

In a preliminary trial, topical application of garlic cloves was used successfully to treat warts in a group of children. A clove was cut in half each night and the flat edge of the clove was rubbed onto each of the warts, carefully cleaning the surrounding areas, so as not to spread any garlic juice. The areas were covered overnight with Band-Aids or waterproof tape and were washed in the morning. In all cases, the warts cleared completely after an average of nine weeks.1 In another study, 23 people with warts applied an oil-soluble garlic extract twice a day to the warts. Complete recovery was seen in every case after one to two weeks. A water-soluble garlic extract was less effective.2 Side effects after application of the oil-soluble extract included blistering, redness, burning, and increased pigmentation of the skin around the application area, which usually disappeared completely in one to two weeks. Zinc oxide ointment was applied to the surrounding normal skin in all cases in an attempt to prevent these side effects.

References

1. Silverberg N. Garlic cloves for verruca vulgaris. Pediatr Dermatol 2002;19:183. [Letter]

2. Dehghani F, Merat A, Panjehshahin MR, Handjani F. Healing effect of garlic extract on warts and corns. Int J Dermatol2005;44:612-5.

Athlete's Foot
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The compound known as ajoene, found in garlic, is an antifungal agent. In a group of 34 people using a 0.4% ajoene cream applied once per day, 79% of them saw complete clearing of athlete's foot after one week; the rest saw complete clearing within two weeks.1 All participants remained cured three months later. One trial found a 1% ajoene cream to be more effective than the standard topical drug terbinafine for treating athlete's foot.2 Ajoene cream is not yet available commercially, but topical application of crushed, raw garlic may be a potential alternative application.

References

1. Ledezma E, DeSousa L, Jorquera A, et al. Efficacy of ajoene, an organosulphur derived from garlic, in the short-term therapy of tinea pedis. Mycoses 1996;39:393-5.

2. Ledezma E, Marcano K, Jorquera A, et al. Efficacy of ajoene in the treatment of tinea pedis: A double-blind and comparative study with terbinafine. J Am Acad Dermatol 2000;43:829-32.

Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia
Dose: 1 ml aged extract per 2.2 lbs (1 kg) of body weight daily

In many parts of Europe, herbal supplements are considered standard medical treatment for BPH. Although herbs for BPH are available without prescription, men wishing to take them should be monitored by a physician.

In a preliminary study, supplementation with a special aged garlic extract (Kastamonu Garlic) in the amount of 1 ml per 2.2 pounds of body weight per day for one month resulted in a 32% reduction in the size of the prostate gland and a significant improvement in urinary symptoms.1 It is not known whether other forms of garlic would have the same effect.

References

1. Durak I, Yilmaz E, Devrim E, et al. Consumption of aqueous garlic extract leads to significant improvement in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer. Nutr Res 2003;23:199-204.

Peptic Ulcer
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Garlic has been reported to have anti-Helicobacter activity in test-tube studies.1, 2 In a preliminary trial, garlic supplementation (300 mg in tablets three times daily for eight weeks) failed to eradicate H. pylori in participants with active infections.3 In another preliminary trial, participants with active H. pylori infections added 10 sliced cloves of garlic to a meal.4 The addition of garlic failed to inhibit the growth of the organism. Further trials using garlic extracts are needed to validate the anti-Helicobacter activity of garlic observed in test tubes. Until then, evidence to support the use of garlic for H. pylori-related peptic ulcers remains weak.

References

1. Sivam GP, Lampe JW, Ulness B, et al. Helicobacter pylori--in vitro susceptibility to garlic (Allium sativum) extract. Nutr Cancer 1997;27:118-21.

2. Chung JG, Chen GW, Wu LT, et al. Effects of garlic compounds diallyl sulfide and diallyl disulfide on arylamine N-acetyltransferase activity in strains of Helicobacter pylori from peptic ulcer patients. Am J Chin Med 1998;26:353-64.

3. Ernst E. Is garlic an effective treatment for Helicobacter pylori infection? Arch Intern Med 1999;159:2484-5 [letter].

4. Graham DY, Anderson SY, Lang T. Garlic or jalapeno peppers for treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection. Am J Gastroenterol 1999;94:1200-2.

Ear Infections
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Ear drops with mullein, St. John's wort, and garlic in an oil or glycerin base are traditional remedies used to alleviate symptoms, particularly pain, during acute ear infections. No clinical trials have investigated the effects of these herbs in people with ear infections. Moreover, oil preparations may obscure a physician's view of the ear drum and should only be used with a healthcare professional's directions.

Ear Infections
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Ear drops with mullein, St. John's wort, and garlic in an oil or glycerin base are traditional remedies used to alleviate symptoms, particularly pain, during acute ear infections. No clinical trials have investigated the effects of these herbs in people with ear infections. Moreover, oil preparations may obscure a physician's view of the ear drum and should only be used with a healthcare professional's directions.

Breast-Feeding Support
Dose: Follow label instructions

Numerous herbs are used traditionally around the world to promote production of breast milk.1 Herbs that promote milk production and flow are known as galactagogues. Stinging nettle(Urtica dioica) enriches and increases the flow of breast milk and restores the mother's energy following childbirth.2Vitex(Vitex agnus castus) is one of the best-recognized herbs in Europe for promoting lactation. An older German clinical trial found that 15 drops of a vitex tincture three times per day could increase the amount of milk produced by mothers with or without pregnancy complications compared with mothers given vitamin B1 or nothing. Vitex should not be taken during pregnancy.3 Goat's rue (Galega officinalis) also has a history of use in Europe for supporting breast-feeding. Taking 1 teaspoon of goat's rue tincture three times per day is considered by European practitioners to be helpful in increasing milk volume.4 Studies are as yet lacking to support the use of goat's rue as a galactagogue. In two preliminary trials, infants have been shown to nurse longer when their mothers ate garlic than when their mothers took placebos.5, 6 However, some infants may develop colic if they consume garlic in breast milk.

References

1. Bingel AS, Farnsworth NR. Higher plants as potential sources of galactagogues. Econ Med Plant Res 1994;6:1-54 [review].

2. Gladstar R. Herbal Healing for Women. New York, Simon and Schuster, 1993, 177.

3. Mohr H. [Clinical investigations of means to increase lactation.] Dtsch Med Wschr 1954;79:1513-6 [in German].

4. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Gothenburg, Sweden: Ab Arcanum and Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd., 1988, 318.

5. Mennella JA, Beauchamp GK. Maternal diet alters the sensory qualities of human milk and the nursling's behavior. Pediatrics 1991;88:737-44.

6. Mennella JA, Beauchamp GK. The effects of repeated exposure to garlic-flavored milk on the nursling's behavior. Pediatr Res 1993;34:805-8.

Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Garlic has demonstrated significant antifungal activity against C. albicans in both animal and test tube studies.1, 2, 3 Greater anti-Candida activity has resulted from exposing Candida to garlic, than to nystatin-the most common prescription drug used to fight Candida.4 No clinical studies of garlic in the treatment of candidiasis have yet been conducted. However, some doctors suggest an intake equal to approximately one clove (4 grams) of fresh garlic per day; this would equal consumption of a garlic tablet that provides a total allicin potential of 4,000 to 5,000 mcg.

References

1. Moore GS, Atkins RD. The fungicidal and fungistatic effects of an aqueous garlic extract on medically important yeast-like fungi. Mycologia 1977;69:341-8.

2. Sandhu DK, Warraich MK, Singh S. Sensitivity of yeasts isolated from cases of vaginitis to aqueous extracts of garlic. Mykosen 1980;23:691-8.

3. Prasad G, Sharma VD. Efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) treatment against experimental candidiasis in chicks. Br Vet J 1980;136:448-51.

4. Arora DS, Kaur J. Anti-microbial activity of spices. Int J Antimicrob Agents 1999;12:257-62.

Chronic Candidiasis
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Garlic has demonstrated significant antifungal activity against C. albicans in both animal and test tube studies.1, 2, 3 Greater anti-Candida activity has resulted from exposing Candida to garlic, than to nystatin-the most common prescription drug used to fight Candida.4 No clinical studies of garlic in the treatment of candidiasis have yet been conducted. However, some doctors suggest an intake equal to approximately one clove (4 grams) of fresh garlic per day; this would equal consumption of a garlic tablet that provides a total allicin potential of 4,000 to 5,000 mcg.

References

1. Moore GS, Atkins RD. The fungicidal and fungistatic effects of an aqueous garlic extract on medically important yeast-like fungi. Mycologia 1977;69:341-8.

2. Sandhu DK, Warraich MK, Singh S. Sensitivity of yeasts isolated from cases of vaginitis to aqueous extracts of garlic. Mykosen 1980;23:691-8.

3. Prasad G, Sharma VD. Efficacy of garlic (Allium sativum) treatment against experimental candidiasis in chicks. Br Vet J 1980;136:448-51.

4. Arora DS, Kaur J. Anti-microbial activity of spices. Int J Antimicrob Agents 1999;12:257-62.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Garlic has been used since time immemorial as a culinary spice and medicinal herb. Garlic has been cultivated in the Middle East for more than 5,000 years and has been an important part of Traditional Chinese Medicine. The region with the largest commercial garlic production is central California. China is also a supplier of commercial garlic. The bulb is used medicinally.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™
 
4.8

(based on 5 reviews)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Effective (4)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Daily use (4)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • Health conscious (5)

    Reviewed by 5 customers

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    5.0

    I stay with this product because it work

    By leelgriff

    from rotonda west fl 33947

    About Me Health Conscious

    Pros

    • Easy To Swallow
    • Effective
    • Simple To Take

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Daily Use
      • Men
      • Women

      Comments about Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™:

      This product works.

       
      5.0

      The best form of garlic

      By gregoryalan1346

      from Fortuna, CA

      About Me Health Conscious

      See all my reviews

      Pros

      • Effective

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Men
        • Women

        Comments about Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™:

        Aged garlic extract (AGE) is the best form of garlic to take. Yet it is difficult to find (read the labels of most garlic supplements - they don't say AGE). Kyolic is a reputable brand which makes high quality supplements, so I recommend this product.

        (2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        TOP QUALITY

        By gregoryalan1346

        from Fortuna, CA

        About Me Health Conscious

        See all my reviews

        Pros

        • Good Value

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Daily Use
          • Good Supplement
          • Preventative

          Comments about Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™:

          I read an article by a professional nutritionist who recommended aged garlic extract (AGE) as the best form of garlic to take. AGE is hard to find, but Kyolic makes it. The capsules are odorless and tasteless, and I don't get garlic breath.

          Garlic has been recognized for centuries for its health benefits. This is the way to go.

          (2 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          Great germ fighter!

          By Leannecaldwell

          from Sterling, VA

          About Me Health Conscious

          See all my reviews

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Effective
          • Good Taste
          • Good Value
          • No Side Effects

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Daily Use
            • Preventative

            Comments about Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™:

            Family members take it daily. When we feel cold, "something" coming on, we double to do a day, along with Vitamin C, and we fight off almost everything!

            (0 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            good to the old people

            By xiaolei_1977

            from singapore

            About Me Health Conscious

            See all my reviews

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Effective

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Daily Use

              Comments about Wakunaga of America Kyolic® CARDIOVASCULAR* Aged Garlic Extract™:

              Bought for parents, good to their health

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