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GNC Women's Iron Complete

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Description
  • 30 mg of blood building iron
  • B-vitamins for proper red blood cell formation
  • Vitamin C and copper for enhanced iron absorption
IRON COMPLETE™Iron is a vital nutrient that plays an essential role in forming healthy red blood cells and transporting oxygen. An estimated 62% of women over age 20 may not be meeting the Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) for iron. GNC Iron Complete™ is a high potency formula that combines 30 mg of iron with iron-enhancing nutrients.Iron
  • Plays a vital role in the formation of healthy red blood cells, energy utilization and muscle function.
B-vitamins
  • Provides folic acid and vitamin B-12, which are required for proper red blood cell formation.
Iron-enhancing ingredients
  • Includes nutrients like vitamin C and copper, which are important in iron absorption.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

As a dietary supplement, take one tablet daily.

Serving Size 1 Tablet
Servings Per Container 60
Amount Per Serving % DV
Vitamin C (as Ascorbic Acid) 50.00 mg 83%
Folic Acid 400.00 mcg 100%
Vitamin B-12 (as Cyanocobalamin) 50.00 mcg 833%
Iron (as Ferrous Fumarate) 30.00 mg 167%
Copper (as Copper Gluconate) 2.00 mg 100%
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Dicalcium Phosphate, Cellulose, Calcium Caseinate, Potassium Gluconate, Enteric Coating (Methacrylic Acid Copolymer, Propylene Glycol, Triethyl Citrate)

No Sugar, No Starch, No Artificial Color, No Artificial Flavors, No Preservatives, Sodium Free, No Wheat, No Gluten, No Corn, No Soy, Yeast Free

Storage Instructions: Store in a cool dry place.

Warning: Accidental overdose of iron-containing products is a leading cause of fatal poisoning in children under 6. Keep this product out of reach of children. In case of accidental overdose, call a doctor or poison control center immediately. KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN.

Contains: Milk

GNC QUALITY COMMITMENT

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Distributed by: General Nutrition Corporation, Pittsburgh, PA 15222
MADE IN THE USA
Conforms to USP <2091> for weight.
Meets USP <2040> disintegration.

Health Notes

Iron

Iron
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iron supplementation prior to surgery was found in one trial to reduce the need for postoperative blood transfusions.(more)
Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In a study of women with iron deficiency and a chronic unexplained cough, supplementation with iron for two months significantly improved symptoms.(more)
HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Iron deficiency is often present in HIV-positive children. Supplementing with it, under a doctor's supervision, may support immune function. (more)
Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Supplementing with iron is essential to treating iron deficiency.(more)
Menorrhagia and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 100 to 200 mg daily under medical supervision if deficient
Supplementing with iron decreases excess menstrual blood loss in iron-deficient women who have no other underlying cause for their condition.(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iron requirements increase during pregnancy, making iron deficiency in pregnancy quite common. Supplementation may help prevent a deficiency.(more)
Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Taking vitamin A and iron together has been reported to help overcome iron deficiency more effectively than iron supplements alone.(more)
Female Infertility and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Even subtle iron deficiencies have been tentatively linked to infertility. Women who are infertile should consult a doctor to rule out the possibility of iron deficiency(more)
Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iron requirements increase during pregnancy, making iron deficiency in pregnancy quite common. Supplementation may help prevent a deficiency.(more)
Breast-Feeding Support and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iron may be required for infants with low iron stores or anemia.(more)
Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In a double-blind trial, supplementing with iron significantly improved fatigue in women who were iron-deficient but not anemic.(more)
Night Blindness and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 30 mg of iron and 6 mg of riboflavin per day
If a person has deficiencies of iron and riboflavin, supplementing with these nutrients may increase the benefits of vitamin A. (more)
Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions
A combination of coenzyme Q10, iron (sodium ferrous citrate), and vitamin B6 may improve mental status in people with Alzheimer's disease.(more)
Canker Sores and Iron Deficiency
Dose:

Consult with your doctor

Talk to your doctor to see if your recurrent canker sores might be related to iron deficiency.(more)
Athletic Performance and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Iron is a component of hemoglobin, which transports oxygen to muscle cells. In cases of iron deficiency, taking iron may restore levels and improve athletic performance.(more)
Celiac Disease and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
The malabsorption that occurs in celiac disease can lead to multiple nutritional deficiencies. Supplementing with iron may correct a deficiency. (more)
Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Supplementing with iron is essential to treating iron deficiency.(more)
Menorrhagia and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 100 to 200 mg daily under medical supervision if deficient
Supplementing with iron decreases excess menstrual blood loss in iron-deficient women who have no other underlying cause for their condition.(more)
Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
Taking vitamin A and iron together has been reported to help overcome iron deficiency more effectively than iron supplements alone.(more)
Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
In one study, iron levels were significantly lower in a group of children with ADHD than in healthy children. In the case of iron deficiency, supplementing with the mineral may improve behavior.(more)
Restless Legs Syndrome and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner
When iron deficiency is the cause of restless leg syndrome, supplementing with iron may reduce the severity of the symptoms.(more)
Childhood Intelligence and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructions
(more)
Night Blindness and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 30 mg of iron and 6 mg of riboflavin per day
If a person has deficiencies of iron and riboflavin, supplementing with these nutrients may increase the benefits of vitamin A. (more)
Pre- and Post-Surgery Health
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

One preliminary study found iron levels to be reduced after both minor and major surgeries, and iron supplementation prior to surgery was not able to prevent this reduction.1 A controlled trial found that intravenous iron was more effective than oral iron for restoring normal iron levels after spinal surgery in children.2 One animal study reported that supplementation with fructo-oligosaccharides (FOS) improved the absorption of iron and prevented anemia after surgery,3 but no human trials have been done to confirm this finding. Some researchers speculate that iron deficiency after a trauma such as surgery is an important mechanism for avoiding infection, and they suggest that iron supplements should not be given after surgery.4

Patients who have undergone major surgery frequently need blood transfusions to replace blood lost during the procedure. Studies have found that 18 to 21% of surgery patients were anemic prior to surgery,5, 6 and these anemic patients required more blood after surgery than did non-anemic surgery patients. Supplementation with iron prior to surgery was found in a controlled trial to reduce the need for blood transfusions, whether or not iron deficiency was present.7Iron supplements (99 mg per day) given before and for two months after joint surgery in another controlled trial improved blood values but did not change the length of hospitalization or the risk of post-operative fever.8 Pre-operative iron supplementation in combination with a medication that stimulates red blood cell production in the bone marrow is considered by some doctors to be an effective way to minimize the need for post-operative blood transfusions.9

References

1. van Iperen CE, Kraaijenhagen RJ, Biesma DH, et al. Iron metabolism and erythropoiesis after surgery. Br J Surg 1998;85:41-5.

2. Berniere J, Dehullu JP, Gall O, Murat I. Intravenous iron in the treatment of postoperative anemia in surgery of the spine in infants and adolescents. Rev Chir Orthop Reparatrice Appar Mot 1998;84:319-22 [in French].

3. Ohta A, Ohtsuki M, Uehara M, et al. Dietary fructo-oligosaccharides prevent postgastrectomy anemia and osteopenia in rats. J Nutr 1998;128:485-90.

4. Mainous MR, Deitch EA. Nutrition and infection. Surg Clin North Am 1994;74:659-76 [review].

5. Andrews CM, Lane DW, Bradley JG. Iron pre-load for major joint replacement. Transfus Med 1997;7:281-6.

6. Goodnough LT, Vizmeg K, Sobecks R, et al. Prevalence and classification of anemia in elective orthopedic surgery patients: implications for blood conservation programs. Vox Sang 1992;63:90-5.

7. Andrews CM, Lane DW, Bradley JG. Iron pre-load for major joint replacement. Transfus Med 1997;7:281-6.

8. Guinea JM, Lafuente P, Mendizabal A, et al. Results of preoperative autotransfusion with ferrous ascorbate prophylaxis in orthopedic surgery patients. Sangre (Barc) 1996;41:25-8 [in Spanish].

9. Tasaki T, Ohto H, Motoki R. Pharmacological approaches to reduce perioperative transfusion requirements in the aged. Drugs Aging 1995;6:91-104 [review].

Cough
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIn a study of women with iron deficiency and a chronic unexplained cough, supplementation with iron for two months significantly improved symptoms.1 Since iron supplementation can be harmful for people who are not deficient, iron levels should be checked with a blood test before taking iron supplements.
References

1. Bucca C, Culla B, Brussino L, et al. Effect of iron supplementation in women with chronic cough and iron deficiency. Int J Clin Pract 2012;66:1095-1100.

HIV and AIDS Support
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Iron deficiency is often present in HIV-positive children.1 While iron is necessary for normal immune function, iron deficiency also appears to protect against certain bacterial infections.2 Iron supplementation could therefore increase the severity of bacterial infections in people with AIDS. For that reason, people with HIV infection or AIDS should consult a doctor before supplementing with iron.

References

1. Castaldo A, Tarallo L, Palomba E, et al. Iron deficiency and intestinal malabsorption in HIV disease. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1996;22:359-63.

2. Humbert JR, Moore LL. Iron deficiency and infection: a dilemma. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr 1983;2:403-6.

Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Caution: People should not supplement with iron unless diagnosed with iron deficiency, because taking iron when it isn't needed has no benefit and may be harmful.

Before iron deficiency can be treated, it must be diagnosed and the cause must be found by a doctor. In addition to addressing the cause (e.g., avoiding aspirin, treating a bleeding ulcer, etc.), supplementation with iron is the primary way to resolve iron-deficiency anemia.

If a doctor diagnoses iron deficiency, iron supplementation is essential. Though some doctors use higher amounts, a common daily dose for adults is 100 mg per day. Even though symptoms of deficiency should disappear much sooner, iron deficient people usually need to keep supplementing with iron for six months to one year until the ferritin test is completely normal. Even after taking enough iron to overcome the deficiency, some people with recurrent iron deficiency-particularly some premenopausal women-need to continue to supplement with smaller levels of iron, such as the 18 mg present in most multivitamin-mineral supplements. This need for continual iron supplementation even after deficiency has been overcome should be determined by a doctor.

Menorrhagia and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 100 to 200 mg daily under medical supervision if deficient

Since blood is rich in iron, excessive blood loss can lead to iron depletion. Iron deficiency can be identified with simple blood tests. If an iron deficiency is diagnosed, many doctors recommend 100-200 mg of iron per day, although recommendations vary widely.

The relationship between iron deficiency and menorrhagia is complicated. Not only can the condition lead to iron deficiency, but iron deficiency can lead to or aggravate menorrhagia by reducing the capacity of the uterus to stop the bleeding. Supplementing with iron decreases excess menstrual blood loss in iron-deficient women who have no other underlying cause for their condition.1, 2 However, iron supplements should be taken only by people who have, or are at risk of developing, iron deficiency.

References

1. Samuels, AJ. Studies in patients with functional menorrhagia: the antimenorrhagic effect of the adequate replication of iron stores. Isr J Med Sci 1965;1:851-3.

2. Taymor ML, Sturgis SH, Yahia C. The etiological role of chronic iron deficiency in production of menorrhagia. JAMA 1964;187:323-7.

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Iron requirements increase during pregnancy, making iron deficiency in pregnancy quite common.1 Iron supplement use in the United States is estimated at 85% during pregnancy, with most women taking supplements three or more times per week for three months.2 Pregnant women with a documented iron deficiency need doctor-supervised treatment. In one study, 65% of women who were not given extra iron developed iron deficiency during pregnancy, compared with none who received an iron supplement.3 However, there is a clear increase in reported side effects with increasing supplement amounts of iron, especially iron sulfate.4, 5 Supplementation with large amounts of iron has also been shown to reduce blood levels of zinc.6 Although the significance of that finding is not clear, low blood levels of zinc have been associated with an increased risk of complications in both the mother and fetus.7

Iron supplementation was associated in one study with an increased incidence of birth defects,8 possibly as a result of an iron-induced deficiency of zinc. Although additional research needs to be done, the evidence suggests that women who are supplementing with iron during pregnancy should also take a multivitamin-mineral formula that contains adequate amounts of zinc. To be on the safe side, pregnant women should discuss their supplement program with a doctor.

References

1. Allen LH. Anemia and iron deficiency: effects on pregnancy outcome. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71(5 Suppl):1280S-4S [review].

2. Yu SM, Keppel KG, Singh GK, Kessel W. Preconceptional and prenatal multivitamin-mineral supplement use in the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Am J Public Health 1996;86:240-2.

3. Romslo I, Haram K, Sagen N, Augensen K. Iron requirement in normal pregnancy as assessed by serum ferritin, serum transferrin saturation and erythrocyte protoporphyrin determinations. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1983;90:101-7.

4. Hemminki E, Uski A, Koponen P, Rimpela U. Iron supplementation during pregnancy-experiences of a randomized trial relying on health service personnel. Control Clin Trials 1989;10:290-8.

5. al-Momen AK, al-Meshari A, al-Nuaim L, et al. Intravenous iron sucrose complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1996;69:121-4.

6. Bloxam DL, Williams NR, Waskett RJD, et al. Maternal zinc during oral iron supplementation in pregnancy: a preliminary study. Clin Sci 1989;76:59-65.

7. Mukherjee MD, Sandstead HH, Ratnaparkhi MV, et al. Maternal zinc, iron, folic acid, and protein nutriture and outcome of human pregnancy. Am J Clin Nutr 1984;40:496-507.

8. Nelson MM, Forfar JO. Associations between drugs administered during pregnancy and congenital abnormalities of the fetus. Br Med J 1971;1:523-7.

Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Taking vitamin A and iron together has been reported to help overcome iron deficiency more effectively than iron supplements alone.1 Although the optimal amount of vitamin A needed to help people with iron deficiency has yet to be established, some doctors recommend 10,000 IU per day.

References

1. Mejia LA, Chew F. Hematological effect of supplementing anemic children with vitamin A alone and in combination with iron. Am J Clin Nutr 1988;48:595-600.

Female Infertility and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructions

In preliminary research, even a subtle deficiency of iron has been tentatively linked to infertility.1 Women who are infertile should consult a doctor to rule out the possibility of iron deficiency.

References

1. Rushton DH, Ramsay ID, Gilkes JJH, Norris MJ. Ferritin and fertility. Lancet 1991;337:1554 [letter].

Pregnancy and Postpartum Support
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Iron requirements increase during pregnancy, making iron deficiency in pregnancy quite common.1 Iron supplement use in the United States is estimated at 85% during pregnancy, with most women taking supplements three or more times per week for three months.2 Pregnant women with a documented iron deficiency need doctor-supervised treatment. In one study, 65% of women who were not given extra iron developed iron deficiency during pregnancy, compared with none who received an iron supplement.3 However, there is a clear increase in reported side effects with increasing supplement amounts of iron, especially iron sulfate.4, 5 Supplementation with large amounts of iron has also been shown to reduce blood levels of zinc.6 Although the significance of that finding is not clear, low blood levels of zinc have been associated with an increased risk of complications in both the mother and fetus.7

Iron supplementation was associated in one study with an increased incidence of birth defects,8 possibly as a result of an iron-induced deficiency of zinc. Although additional research needs to be done, the evidence suggests that women who are supplementing with iron during pregnancy should also take a multivitamin-mineral formula that contains adequate amounts of zinc. To be on the safe side, pregnant women should discuss their supplement program with a doctor.

References

1. Allen LH. Anemia and iron deficiency: effects on pregnancy outcome. Am J Clin Nutr 2000;71(5 Suppl):1280S-4S [review].

2. Yu SM, Keppel KG, Singh GK, Kessel W. Preconceptional and prenatal multivitamin-mineral supplement use in the 1988 National Maternal and Infant Health Survey. Am J Public Health 1996;86:240-2.

3. Romslo I, Haram K, Sagen N, Augensen K. Iron requirement in normal pregnancy as assessed by serum ferritin, serum transferrin saturation and erythrocyte protoporphyrin determinations. Br J Obstet Gynaecol 1983;90:101-7.

4. Hemminki E, Uski A, Koponen P, Rimpela U. Iron supplementation during pregnancy-experiences of a randomized trial relying on health service personnel. Control Clin Trials 1989;10:290-8.

5. al-Momen AK, al-Meshari A, al-Nuaim L, et al. Intravenous iron sucrose complex in the treatment of iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 1996;69:121-4.

6. Bloxam DL, Williams NR, Waskett RJD, et al. Maternal zinc during oral iron supplementation in pregnancy: a preliminary study. Clin Sci 1989;76:59-65.

7. Mukherjee MD, Sandstead HH, Ratnaparkhi MV, et al. Maternal zinc, iron, folic acid, and protein nutriture and outcome of human pregnancy. Am J Clin Nutr 1984;40:496-507.

8. Nelson MM, Forfar JO. Associations between drugs administered during pregnancy and congenital abnormalities of the fetus. Br Med J 1971;1:523-7.

Breast-Feeding Support and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitionerIf a doctor diagnoses iron deficiency, iron supplementation is essential. Though some doctors use higher amounts, a common daily dose for adults is 100 mg per day. Even though symptoms of deficiency should disappear much sooner, iron deficient people usually need to keep supplementing with iron for six months to one year until the ferritin test is completely normal. Even after taking enough iron to overcome the deficiency, some people with recurrent iron deficiency-particularly some premenopausal women-need to continue to supplement with smaller levels of iron, such as the 18 mg present in most multivitamin-mineral supplements. This need for continual iron supplementation even after deficiency has been overcome should be determined by a doctor.1
References

1. American Academy of Pediatrics, Committee on Fetus and Newborn, and American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Maternal and newborn nutrition. In: Guidelines for Perinatal Care. 4th ed. Washington, DC: ACOG, AAP, 1997.

Chronic Fatigue Syndrome
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIron-deficiency anemia is a well-known cause of fatigue. Fatigue that is due to iron-deficiency anemia usually improves after iron supplementation. Iron deficiency in the absence of anemia can also cause fatigue, because iron plays a role in various biochemical processes involved in energy production. In a double-blind trial, supplementing with 80 mg per day of iron for 12 weeks, significantly improved fatigue compared with a placebo in women who were iron-deficient but not anemic.1 Iron supplementation has the potential to cause harm in people who are not deficient, so it should only be used when iron deficiency has been documented by laboratory testing.
References

1. Vaucher P, Druais PL, Waldvogel S, Favrat B. Effect of iron supplementation on fatigue in nonanemic menstruating women with low ferritin: a randomized controlled trial. CMAJ 2012;184:1247?54.

Night Blindness and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 30 mg of iron and 6 mg of riboflavin per day

In a study of women in Nepal, where there is a high prevalence of iron and riboflavin deficiencies, supplementation with 30 mg per day of iron and 6 mg per day of riboflavin for six weeks enhanced the effectiveness of vitamin A in the treatment of night blindness.1 It is not known whether these nutrients would be helpful for night blindness in people who are not deficient.

References

1. Graham JM, Haskell MJ, Pandey P, et al. Supplementation with iron and riboflavin enhances dark adaptation response to vitamin A-fortified rice in iron-deficient, pregnant, nightblind Nepali women. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:1375-84.

Alzheimer's Disease
Dose: Refer to label instructions

In a preliminary report, two people with a hereditary form of Alzheimer's disease received daily: coenzyme Q10 (60 mg), iron (150 mg of sodium ferrous citrate), and vitamin B6 (180 mg). Mental status improved in both patients, and one became almost normal after six months.1

References

1. Imagawa M, Naruse S, Tsuji S, et al. Coenzyme Q10, iron, and vitamin B6 in genetically-confirmed Alzheimer's disease. Lancet 1992;340:671 [letter].

Canker Sores and Iron Deficiency
Dose:

Consult with your doctor

Several preliminary studies,1, 2, 3, 4 though not all,5 have found a surprisingly high incidence of iron and B vitamin deficiency among people with recurrent canker sores. Treating these deficiencies has been reported in preliminary6, 7 and controlled8 studies to reduce or eliminate canker sore recurrences in most cases. Supplementing daily with B vitamins-300 mg vitamin B1, 20 mg vitamin B2, and 150 mg vitamin B6-has been reported to provide some people with relief.9 Thiamine (B1) deficiency specifically has been linked to an increased risk of canker sores.10 The right supplemental level of iron requires diagnosis of an iron deficiency by a healthcare professional using lab tests.

References

1. Porter SR, Scully C, Flint S. Hematologic status in recurrent aphthous stomatitis compared to other oral disease. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1988;66:41-4.

2. Palopoli J, Waxman J. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and vitamin B12 deficiency. South Med J 1990;83:475-7.

3. Wray D, Ferguson MM, Hutcheon WA, Dagg JH. Nutritional deficiencies in recurrent aphthae. J Oral Pathol 1978;7:418-23.

4. Barnadas MA, Remacha A, Condomines J, de Moragas JM. [Hematologic deficiencies in patients with recurrent oral aphthae]. Med Clin (Barc) 1997;109:85-7 [in Spanish].

5. Olson JA, Feinberg I, Silverman S, et al. Serum vitamin B12, folate, and iron levels in recurrent aphthous ulceration. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol 1982;54:517-20.

6. Weusten BL, van de Wiel A. Aphthous ulcers and vitamin B12 deficiency. Neth J Med 1998;53:172-5.

7. Porter S, Flint S, Scully C, Keith O. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis: the efficacy of replacement therapy in patients with underlying hematinic deficiencies. Ann Dent 1992;51:14-6.

8. Wray D, Ferguson MM, Mason DK, et al. Recurrent aphthae: treatment with vitamin B12, folic acid, and iron. Br Med J 1975;2(5969):490-3.

9. Nolan A, McIntosh WB, Allam BF, Lamey PJ. Recurrent aphthous ulceration: vitamin B1, B2 and B6 status and response to replacement therapy. J Oral Pathol Med 1991;20:389-91.

10. Haisraeli-Shalish M, Livneh A, Katz J, et al. Recurrent aphthous stomatitis and thiamine deficiency. Oral Surg Oral Med Oral Pathol Oral Radiol Endod 1996;82:634-6.

Athletic Performance and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Iron is important for an athlete because it is a component of hemoglobin, which transports oxygen to muscle cells. Some athletes, especially women, do not get enough iron in their diet. In addition, for reasons that are unclear, endurance athletes, such as marathon runners, frequently have low body-iron levels.1, 2, 3 However, anemia in athletes is often not due to iron deficiency and may be a normal adaptation to the stress of exercise.4 Supplementing with iron is usually unwise unless a deficiency has been diagnosed. People who experience undue fatigue (an early warning sign of iron deficiency) should have their iron status evaluated by a doctor. Athletes who are found to be iron deficient by a physician are typically given 100 mg per day until blood tests indicate they are no longer deficient. Supplementing iron-deficient athletes with 100 to 200 mg per day of iron increased aerobic exercise performance in some,5, 6, 7 though not all,8, 9 double-blind studies. A recent double-blind trial found that iron-deficient women who took 20 mg per day of iron for six weeks were able to perform knee strength exercises for a longer time without muscle fatigue compared with those taking a placebo.10

References

1. Mechrefe A, Wexler B, Feller E. Sports anemia and gastrointestinal bleeding in endurance athletes. Med Health R I 1997;80:216-8.

2. Clarkson PM. Micronutrients and exercise: anti-oxidants and minerals. J Sports Sci 1995;13:S11-24 [review].

3. Smith JA. Exercise, training and red blood cell turnover. Sports Med 1995;19:9-31 [review].

4. Smith JA. Exercise, training and red blood cell turnover. Sports Med 1995;19:9-31 [review].

5. Brownlie T 4th, Utermohlen V, Hinton PS, et al. Marginal iron deficiency without anemia impairs aerobic adaptation among previously untrained women. Am J Clin Nutr 2002;75:734-42.

6. Friedmann B, Weller E, Mairbaurl H, Bartsch P. Effects of iron repletion on blood volume and performance capacity in young athletes. Med Sci Sports Exerc 2001;33:741-6.

7. Hinton PS, Giordano C, Brownlie T, Haas JD. Iron supplementation improves endurance after training in iron-depleted, nonanemic women. J Appl Physiol 2000;88:1103-11.

8. Zhu YI, Haas JD. Altered metabolic response of iron-depleted nonanemic women during a 15-km time trial. J Appl Physiol 1998;84:1768-75.

9. Nielsen P, Nachtigall D. Iron supplementation in athletes. Current recommendations. Sports Med 1998;26:207-16 [review].

10. Brutsaert TD, Hernandez-Cordero S, Rivera J, et al. Iron supplementation improves progressive fatigue resistance during dynamic knee extensor exercise in iron-depleted, nonanemic women. Am J Clin Nutr 2003;77:441-8.

Celiac Disease and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

The malabsorption that occurs in celiac disease can lead to multiple nutritional deficiencies. The most common nutritional problems in people with celiac disease include deficiencies of essential fatty acids, iron, vitamin D, vitamin K, calcium, magnesium, and folic acid.1Zinc malabsorption also occurs frequently in celiac disease2 and may result in zinc deficiency, even in people who are otherwise in remission.3 People with newly diagnosed celiac disease should be assessed for nutritional deficiencies by a doctor. Celiac patients who have not yet completely recovered should supplement with a high-potency multivitamin-mineral. Some patients may require even higher amounts of some of these vitamins and minerals-an issue that should be discussed with their healthcare practitioner. Evidence of a nutrient deficiency in a celiac patient is a clear indication for supplementation with that nutrient.

After commencement of a gluten-free diet, overall nutritional status gradually improves. However, deficiencies of some nutrients may persist, even in people who are strictly avoiding gluten. For example, magnesium deficiency was found in 8 of 23 adults with celiac disease who had been following a gluten-free diet and were symptom-free. When these adults were supplemented with magnesium for two years, their bone mineral density increased significantly.4

References

1. Connon JJ. Celiac disease. In: Shils ME, Olson JA, Shike M, eds. Modern Nutrition in Health and Disease, 8th ed. Philadelphia: Lea & Febiger, 1994, 1062.

2. Crofton RW, Glover SC, Ewen SWB, et al. Zinc absorption in celiac disease and dermatitis herpetiformis: a test of small intestinal function. Am J Clin Nutr 1983;38:706-12.

3. Solomons NW, Rosenberg IH, Sandstead HH. Zinc nutrition in celiac sprue. Am J Clin Nutr 1976;29:371-5.

4. Rude RK, Olerich M. Magnesium deficiency: possible role in osteoporosis associated with gluten-sensitive enteropathy. Osteoporos Int 1996;6:453-61.

Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Caution: People should not supplement with iron unless diagnosed with iron deficiency, because taking iron when it isn't needed has no benefit and may be harmful.

Before iron deficiency can be treated, it must be diagnosed and the cause must be found by a doctor. In addition to addressing the cause (e.g., avoiding aspirin, treating a bleeding ulcer, etc.), supplementation with iron is the primary way to resolve iron-deficiency anemia.

If a doctor diagnoses iron deficiency, iron supplementation is essential. Though some doctors use higher amounts, a common daily dose for adults is 100 mg per day. Even though symptoms of deficiency should disappear much sooner, iron deficient people usually need to keep supplementing with iron for six months to one year until the ferritin test is completely normal. Even after taking enough iron to overcome the deficiency, some people with recurrent iron deficiency-particularly some premenopausal women-need to continue to supplement with smaller levels of iron, such as the 18 mg present in most multivitamin-mineral supplements. This need for continual iron supplementation even after deficiency has been overcome should be determined by a doctor.

Menorrhagia and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 100 to 200 mg daily under medical supervision if deficient

Since blood is rich in iron, excessive blood loss can lead to iron depletion. Iron deficiency can be identified with simple blood tests. If an iron deficiency is diagnosed, many doctors recommend 100-200 mg of iron per day, although recommendations vary widely.

The relationship between iron deficiency and menorrhagia is complicated. Not only can the condition lead to iron deficiency, but iron deficiency can lead to or aggravate menorrhagia by reducing the capacity of the uterus to stop the bleeding. Supplementing with iron decreases excess menstrual blood loss in iron-deficient women who have no other underlying cause for their condition.1, 2 However, iron supplements should be taken only by people who have, or are at risk of developing, iron deficiency.

References

1. Samuels, AJ. Studies in patients with functional menorrhagia: the antimenorrhagic effect of the adequate replication of iron stores. Isr J Med Sci 1965;1:851-3.

2. Taymor ML, Sturgis SH, Yahia C. The etiological role of chronic iron deficiency in production of menorrhagia. JAMA 1964;187:323-7.

Iron-Deficiency Anemia
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Taking vitamin A and iron together has been reported to help overcome iron deficiency more effectively than iron supplements alone.1 Although the optimal amount of vitamin A needed to help people with iron deficiency has yet to be established, some doctors recommend 10,000 IU per day.

References

1. Mejia LA, Chew F. Hematological effect of supplementing anemic children with vitamin A alone and in combination with iron. Am J Clin Nutr 1988;48:595-600.

Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Iron status, as measured by the serum ferritin concentration, was significantly lower in a group of children with ADHD than in healthy children. Ferritin levels were below normal in 84% of the children with ADHD, compared with 18% of the healthy children.1 Since iron deficiency can adversely affect mood and cognitive function, iron status should be assessed in children with ADHD, and those who are deficient should receive an iron supplement. In a case report, a young boy with both ADHD and iron deficiency showed considerable improvement in behavior after receiving an iron supplement.2 Iron supplementation was also beneficial in a double-blind study of children with ADHD and iron deficiency.3

References

1. Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Arnulf I, Mouren MC. Iron deficiency in children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med 2004;158:1113-5.

2. Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Deron J, et al. Effects of iron supplementation on attention defecit hyperactivity disorder in children. Pediatr Neurol 2008; 38:20-6.

3. Konofal E, Lecendreux M, Deron J, et al. Effects of iron supplementation on attention defecit hyperactivity disorder in children. Pediatr Neurol 2008; 38:20-6.

Restless Legs Syndrome and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Consult a qualified healthcare practitioner

Mild iron deficiency is common, even in people who are not anemic. When iron deficiency is the cause of RLS, supplementation with iron has been reported to reduce the severity of the symptoms. In one trial, 74 mg of iron taken three times a day for two months, reduced symptoms in people with RLS.1 In people who are not deficient in iron, iron supplementation has been reported to not help reduce symptoms of RLS.2 Most people are not iron deficient, and taking too much can lead to adverse effects. Therefore, iron supplements should only be taken by people who have a diagnosed deficiency.

References

1. O'Keeffe ST, Gavin K, Lavan JN. Iron status and restless legs syndrome in the elderly. Age Ageing 1994;23:200-3.

2. Davis BJ, Rajput A, Rajput ML, et al. A randomized, double-blind placebo-controlled trial of iron in restless legs syndrome. Eur Neurol 2000;43:70-5.

Childhood Intelligence and Iron Deficiency
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIron plays an important role in brain development and cognitive function. In a preliminary study, children with iron deficiency, regardless of whether they had anemia, had more than twice the risk of scoring below average on a math test, compared with children with normal iron status.1
References

1. Halterman JS, Kaczorowski JM, Aligne CA, et al. Iron deficiency and cognitive achievement among school-aged children and adolescents in the United States. Pediatrics 2001;107:1381-6.

Night Blindness and Iron Deficiency
Dose: 30 mg of iron and 6 mg of riboflavin per day

In a study of women in Nepal, where there is a high prevalence of iron and riboflavin deficiencies, supplementation with 30 mg per day of iron and 6 mg per day of riboflavin for six weeks enhanced the effectiveness of vitamin A in the treatment of night blindness.1 It is not known whether these nutrients would be helpful for night blindness in people who are not deficient.

References

1. Graham JM, Haskell MJ, Pandey P, et al. Supplementation with iron and riboflavin enhances dark adaptation response to vitamin A-fortified rice in iron-deficient, pregnant, nightblind Nepali women. Am J Clin Nutr 2007;85:1375-84.

Iron is an essential mineral. It is part of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of the blood. Iron-deficient people tire easily in part because their bodies are starved for oxygen. Iron is also part of myoglobin, which helps muscle cells store oxygen. Without enough iron, adenosine triphosphate (ATP; the fuel the body runs on) cannot be properly synthesized. As a result, some iron-deficient people become fatigued even when their hemoglobin levels are normal (i.e., when they are not anemic).

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

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GNC Women's Iron Complete
 
4.7

(based on 19 reviews)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Effective (15)
  • Simple to take (14)
  • Easy on stomach (12)
  • Easy to swallow (12)
  • Easy to use (5)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Women (15)
    • Daily use (12)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • First time user (7), Health conscious (4)
      • My Beauty Routine Takes:
      • 10 minutes (3)

    Reviewed by 19 customers

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    5.0

    Effective

    By wanghaopost

    from Baldwin Park, CA

    About Me First Time User

    See all my reviews

    Pros

    • Easy on Stomach
    • Easy To Swallow
    • Effective
    • Simple To Take

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Women

      Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

      Iron supplements is effective

      (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

       
      4.0

      Love these pills!!!

      By amelia.davis91

      from Tallahassee, Fl

      About Me Anemic

      See all my reviews

      Pros

      • Easy on Stomach
      • Effective
      • Powerful
      • Simple To Take

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Women

        Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

        I was looking for a good iron pill that WONT make me constipated and easy on my stomach. I hate taking pills and I do forget at times to take anything on a regular basis (i.e, vitamins). These iron pills are the BEST ones I have taken thus far. I've been anemic since birth and Im 41 years old...I have no complaints about these pills. I didnt believe some of the reviews when some stated they give you energy after one use...but its true! I had energy througout the day and my cycles are not as heavy, like they used to be. My doctor told me my iron level was dangerously low and I need to start on iron pills ASAP. After taking these for a month, she saw a drastic improvement!

        (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        Brought my levels back up quickly!

        By bail4him

        from Papillion, NE

        About Me First Time User

        See all my reviews

        Pros

        • Easy on Stomach
        • Easy To Swallow
        • Effective
        • Simple To Take
        • Tastes Good

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Women

          Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

          My iron was very low. I could not tolerate the prescription high dose. After 3 months of taking 1 daily of GNC's, my level was perfect. The dr said my hemoglobin was better than hers! I was able to cut back to just a couple a week.

          (4 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          Really Works!!!

          By fraziernelly

          from Deltona, Fl

          About Me First Time User

          See all my reviews

          Pros

          • Easy on Stomach
          • Easy To Swallow
          • Effective
          • Simple To Take

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Daily Use
            • Women

            Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

            I use this product everyday. The reason I started to use this pill was because my doctor said that I was anemic so I needed something to help me with my blood count. This pill has given me a great amount of energy. I wake up at 4:30 a.m for work so around 9:00 a.m I would be so tired for the rest of the day and rushed home so that I could take a nap. No I go through the whole day without felling tired.

            (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

             
            4.0

            Easy to swallow

            By m.a.holthaus

            from Iowa

            About Me First Time User

            See all my reviews

            Pros

            • Easy on Stomach
            • Easy To Swallow
            • Simple To Take

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Women

              Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

              Easy to swallow and carry around

              (4 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

               
              5.0

              A Life Saver!!!

              By syetaj

              from Plano, TX

              About Me First Time User

              See all my reviews

              Pros

              • Easy on Stomach
              • Easy To Swallow
              • Effective
              • Simple To Take
              • Tastes Good

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Daily Use
                • Women

                Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

                I used regurlar Iron pills from the drug store, and my iron was still a little low plus I had shooting pain in my finger and toes for almost a year. I remember GNA carry good products, so I decided to try Iron Complete for women.

                OMG this was the BEST thing!!!!

                After 1 week of taken these pills I had NO MORE problems with my blood or pain. I been taken these pills for 6 weeks now. I will continue this regiment for the rest of my life.

                Thank you GNC :-)

                (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                 
                4.0

                Taking this everyday now

                By gosokan

                from CN

                About Me First Time User

                See all my reviews

                Pros

                • Simple To Take

                Cons

                  Best Uses

                  • Women

                  Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

                  Taking this a week now. Looking forward how it will work

                  (0 of 1 customers found this review helpful)

                   
                  5.0

                  Good product

                  By runze.hu

                  from Rochester, ny

                  About Me First Time User

                  See all my reviews

                  Pros

                  • Easy To Swallow
                  • Simple To Take

                  Cons

                    Best Uses

                    • Women

                    Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

                    It is really easy to take it with you

                     
                    5.0

                    Gives me the boost that I need.

                    By ral441

                    from Illinois

                    See all my reviews

                    Verified Buyer

                    Pros

                    • Easy To Use
                    • Effective

                    Cons

                      Best Uses

                      • Daily Use

                      Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

                      Easy to use and gives me the energy I need
                      to get the day started.

                      (2 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

                       
                      5.0

                      More Energy!

                      By markert.jt

                      from Washington, DC

                      About Me Budget Buyer

                      See all my reviews

                      Verified Buyer

                      Pros

                      • Easy To Use

                      Cons

                        Best Uses

                        • Daily Use

                        Comments about GNC Women's Iron Complete:

                        Once a day and i'm full of extra energy!

                        • My Beauty Routine Takes:
                        • 30 Minutes

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