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GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300

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90 Softgel Capsules

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Description
  • Each capsule provides 1,300mg of EPO.
  • Evening Primrose Oil naturally provides essential fatty acids that must be supplied through the diet.
  • Typical Fatty Acid Profile Per Serving:
    Easy-to-swallow softgel capsules.
  • * These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

    Supplement Facts

    As a dietary supplement, take one or two softgel capsules daily.

    Serving Size 1 Softgel Capsules
    Servings Per Container 90
    Amount Per Serving % DV
    Calories 10.00
    Calories from Fat 10.00
    Total Fat (as Evening Primrose Oil) 1.00 g 2%
    Polyunsaturated Fat 1.00 g 5%
    Evening Primrose Oil (Oenothera biennis) 1.00 g **
    ** Daily Value (DV) not established

    Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Glycerin

    No Sugar, No Starch, No Artificial Color, No Artificial Flavors, No Preservatives, Sodium Free, No Corn, No Wheat, No Gluten, No Soy, No Dairy, Yeast Free

    Storage Instructions: Store in a cool dry place.

    Warning: After opening, keep tightly closed in refrigerator or other cool place.

    0

    Health Notes

    Evening Primrose Oil

    Evening Primrose Oil
    This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
    • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
    • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
    • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

    Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

    For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

    This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

    Premenstrual Syndrome
    Dose: 3 to 4 grams daily
    Women with PMS may have impaired conversion of linoleic acid to gamma linolenic acid (GLA). Evening primrose oil contains GLA and may reduce PMS symptoms.(more)
    Fibrocystic Breast Disease
    Dose: 3 grams daily
    Taking evening primrose oil may help alleviate symptoms.(more)
    Premenstrual Syndrome
    Dose: 3 to 4 grams daily
    Women with PMS may have impaired conversion of linoleic acid to gamma linolenic acid (GLA). Evening primrose oil contains GLA and may reduce PMS symptoms.(more)
    Osteoporosis
    Dose: 6 grams daily
    Fish oil combined with evening primrose oil (EPO) may improve calcium absorption and promote bone formation.(more)
    Eczema
    Dose: Adults: 500 to 1,000 mg a day of GLA; children: proportionately less, according to body weight
    Supplementing with evening primrose oil can supply anti-inflammatory fatty acids that are missing in many people with eczema.(more)
    Skin Ulcers
    Dose: 1,500 mg with each meal
    A preliminary report suggested that evening primrose oil improves blood flow to the legs and heals or reduces the size of venous leg ulcers.(more)
    Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Dose: 540 to 1,100 mg daily of GLA
    Evening primrose oil appears to be an effective treatment for people with rheumatoid arthritis. It contains gamma linolenic acid, which is converted in part to an anti-inflammatory substance.(more)
    Atherosclerosis
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    Taking evening primrose oil has been shown to lower cholesterol in double-blind research. Lowering cholesterol levels should in turn reduce the risk of atherosclerosis.(more)
    Intermittent Claudication
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    In a preliminary trial, supplementing with evening primrose oil led to a 10% increase in exercise tolerance in people with intermittent claudication.(more)
    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    Evening primrose oil contains gamma-linolenic acid, a type of omega-3 fatty acid that has been linked to reduced risk of COPD.(more)
    Raynaud's Disease
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    Fatty acids in evening primrose oil (EPO) inhibit the formation of prostaglandins, which promote blood vessel constriction. One study found that supplementing with EPO reduced the number and severity of attacks.(more)
    Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    A deficiency of several essential fatty acids has been observed in some children with ADHD. In one study, children who received evening primrose oil showed minor improvements.(more)
    Type 2 Diabetes
    Dose: 4 grams daily
    Supplementing with evening primrose oil has been found to improve nerve function and to relieve pain symptoms of diabetic neuropathy.(more)
    Type 1 Diabetes
    Dose: See Learn More for details
    Evening primrose oil has been associated with improved diabetic neuropathy. However, the principal investigator who conducted these clinical trials was found to have falsified research results, so whether EPO or GLA is of any value for neuropathy is still unknown. (more)
    Irritable Bowel Syndrome and PMS
    Dose: Refer to label instructions
    In one trial, women with IBS who experienced worsening symptoms before and during their menstrual period were helped by taking evening primrose oil.(more)
    Premenstrual Syndrome
    Dose: 3 to 4 grams daily

    Women with PMS have been shown to have impaired conversion of linoleic acid (an essential fatty acid) to gamma linolenic acid (GLA).1 Because a deficiency of GLA might, in theory, be a factor in PMS and because evening primrose oil (EPO) contains significant amounts of GLA, researchers have studied EPO as a potential way to reduce symptoms of PMS. In several double-blind trials, EPO was found to be beneficial,2, 3, 4, 5 whereas in other trials it was no more effective than placebo.6, 7

    Despite these conflicting results, some doctors consider EPO to be worth a try; the amount usually recommended is 3-4 grams per day. EPO may work best when used over several menstrual cycles and may be more helpful in women with PMS who also experience breast tenderness or fibrocystic breast disease.8

    References

    1. Horrobin DF, Manku M, Brush M, et al. Abnormalities in plasma essential fatty acid levels in women with pre-menstrual syndrome and with non-malignant breast disease. J Nutr Med 1991;2:259-64.

    2. Puolakka J, Makarainen L, Viinikka L, Ylikorkola O. Biochemical and clinical effects of treating the premenstrual syndrome with prostaglandin synthesis precursors. J Reprod Med 1985;30:149-53.

    3. Ockerman PA, Bachrack I, Glans S, Rassner S. Evening primrose oil as a treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. Rec Adv Clin Nutr 1986;2:404-5.

    4. Massil H, O'Brien PMS, Brush MG. A double blind trial of Efamol evening primrose oil in premenstrual syndrome. 2nd International Symposium on PMS, Kiawah Island, Sep 1987.

    5. Casper R. A double blind trial of evening primrose oil in premenstrual syndrome. 2nd International Symposium on PMS, Kiawah Island, Sep 1987.

    6. Khoo SK, Munro C, Battisutta D. Evening primrose oil and treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Med J Aust 1990;153:189-92.

    7. Collins A, Cerin A, Coleman G, Landgren B-M. Essential fatty acids in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. ObstetGynecol 1993;81:93-8.

    8. McFayden IJ, Forrest AP, Chetty U, Raab G. Cyclical breast pain - some observations and the difficulties in treatment. Br J Clin Pract 1992; 46:161-4.

    Fibrocystic Breast Disease
    Dose: 3 grams daily

    In double-blind research, evening primrose oil (EPO) has reduced symptoms of FBD,1, 2 though only slightly.3 One group of researchers reported that EPO normalizes blood levels of fatty acids in women with FBD.4 However, even these scientists had difficulty linking the improvement in lab tests with an actual reduction in symptoms. Nonetheless, most reports continue to show at least some reduction in symptoms resulting from EPO supplementation.5, 6 Based on this research, many doctors recommend a trial of 3 grams per day of EPO for at least six months to alleviate symptoms of FBD.

    References

    1. Mansel RE, Pye JK, Hughes LE. Effects of Essential fatty acids on cyclical mastalgia and noncyclical breast disorders. In Omega-6 essential fatty acids: Pathophysiology and roles in clinical medicine. New York: Alan R Liss, 1990, 557-66.

    2. Preece PE, Hanslip JI, Gilbert L, et al. Evening primrose oil (EFAMOL) for mastalgia. In: Clinical Uses of Essential Fatty Acids, ed. DF Horrobin, Montreal: Eden Press, 1982, 147-54.

    3. Mansel RE, Harrison BJ, Melhuish J, et al. A randomized trial of dietary intervention with essential fatty acids in patients with categorized cysts. Ann NY Acad Sci 1990;586:288-94.

    4. Gateley CA, Maddox PR, Pritchard GA, et al. Plasma fatty acid profiles in benign breast disorders. Br J Surg 1992;79:407-9.

    5. Harding C, Harvey J, Kirkman R, Bundred N. Hormone replacement therapy-induced mastalgia responds to evening primrose oil. Br J Surg 1996;83(Suppl 1):24 [abstract # Breast 012].

    6. Pye JK, Mansel RE, Hughes LE. Clinical experience of drug treatments for mastalgia. Lancet 1985;ii:373-7.

    Premenstrual Syndrome
    Dose: 3 to 4 grams daily

    Women with PMS have been shown to have impaired conversion of linoleic acid (an essential fatty acid) to gamma linolenic acid (GLA).1 Because a deficiency of GLA might, in theory, be a factor in PMS and because evening primrose oil (EPO) contains significant amounts of GLA, researchers have studied EPO as a potential way to reduce symptoms of PMS. In several double-blind trials, EPO was found to be beneficial,2, 3, 4, 5 whereas in other trials it was no more effective than placebo.6, 7

    Despite these conflicting results, some doctors consider EPO to be worth a try; the amount usually recommended is 3-4 grams per day. EPO may work best when used over several menstrual cycles and may be more helpful in women with PMS who also experience breast tenderness or fibrocystic breast disease.8

    References

    1. Horrobin DF, Manku M, Brush M, et al. Abnormalities in plasma essential fatty acid levels in women with pre-menstrual syndrome and with non-malignant breast disease. J Nutr Med 1991;2:259-64.

    2. Puolakka J, Makarainen L, Viinikka L, Ylikorkola O. Biochemical and clinical effects of treating the premenstrual syndrome with prostaglandin synthesis precursors. J Reprod Med 1985;30:149-53.

    3. Ockerman PA, Bachrack I, Glans S, Rassner S. Evening primrose oil as a treatment of the premenstrual syndrome. Rec Adv Clin Nutr 1986;2:404-5.

    4. Massil H, O'Brien PMS, Brush MG. A double blind trial of Efamol evening primrose oil in premenstrual syndrome. 2nd International Symposium on PMS, Kiawah Island, Sep 1987.

    5. Casper R. A double blind trial of evening primrose oil in premenstrual syndrome. 2nd International Symposium on PMS, Kiawah Island, Sep 1987.

    6. Khoo SK, Munro C, Battisutta D. Evening primrose oil and treatment of premenstrual syndrome. Med J Aust 1990;153:189-92.

    7. Collins A, Cerin A, Coleman G, Landgren B-M. Essential fatty acids in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome. ObstetGynecol 1993;81:93-8.

    8. McFayden IJ, Forrest AP, Chetty U, Raab G. Cyclical breast pain - some observations and the difficulties in treatment. Br J Clin Pract 1992; 46:161-4.

    Osteoporosis
    Dose: 6 grams daily

    A preliminary trial found that elderly women with osteoporosis who were given 4 grams of fish oil per day for four months had improved calcium absorption and evidence of new bone formation.1 Fish oil combined with evening primrose oil (EPO) may confer added benefits. In a controlled trial, women received 6 grams of a combination of EPO and fish oil, or a matching placebo, plus 600 mg of calcium per day for three years.2 The EPO/fish oil group experienced no spinal bone loss in the first 18 months and a significant 3.1% increase in spinal bone mineral density during the last 18 months.

    References

    1. Van Papendorp DH, Coetzer H, Kruger MC. Biochemical profile of osteoporotic patients on essential fatty acid supplementation. Nutr Res 1995;15:325-34.

    2. Kruger MC, Coetzer H, de Winter R, et al. Calcium, gamma-linolenic acid and eicosapentaenoic acid supplementation in senile osteoporosis. Aging 1998;10:385-94.

    Eczema
    Dose: Adults: 500 to 1,000 mg a day of GLA; children: proportionately less, according to body weight

    Researchers have reported that people with eczema do not have the normal ability to process fatty acids, which can result in a deficiency of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA).1 GLA is found in evening primrose oil (EPO), borage oil, and black currant seed oil. Some,2, 3, 4 but not all,5, 6, 7, 8 double-blind trials have shown that EPO is useful in the treatment of eczema. An analysis of nine trials reported that the effects for reduced itching were most striking.9 Much of the research uses 12 pills per day; each pill contains 500 mg of EPO, of which 45 mg is GLA. Smaller amounts have been shown to lack efficacy.10

    References

    1. Manku MS, Horrobin DF, Morse NL, et al. Essential fatty acids in the plasma phospholipids of patients with atopic eczema. Br J Dermatol 1984;110:643-8.

    2. Schalin-Karrila M, Mattila L, Jansen CT, et al. Evening primrose oil in the treatment of atopic eczema: effect on clinical status, plasma phospholipid fatty acids and circulating blood prostaglandins. Br J Dermatol 1987;117:11-9.

    3. Lovell CR, Burton JL, Horrobin DF. Treatment of atopic eczema with evening primrose oil. Lancet 1981;I:278 [letter].

    4. Wright S, Burton JL. Oral evening-primrose oil improves atopic eczema. Lancet 1982;ii:1120-2.

    5. Skogh M. Atopic eczema unresponsive to evening primrose oil (linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids). J Am Acad Dermatol 1986;15:114-5.

    6. Bamford JTM, Gibson RW, Renier CM. Atopic eczema unresponsive to evening primrose oil (linoleic and gamma-linolenic acids). J Am Acad Dermatol 1985;13:959-65.

    7. Hederos CA, Berg A. Epogam evening primrose oil treatment in atopic dermatitis and asthma. Arch Dis Child 1996;75:494-7.

    8. Whitaker DK, Cilliers J, de Beer C. Evening primrose oil (Epogam) in the treatment of chronic hand dermatitis: disappointing therapeutic results. Dermatology 1996;193:115-20.

    9. Morse PF, Horrobin DF, Manku MS, et al. Meta-analysis of placebo-controlled studies of the efficacy of Epogam in the treatment of atopic eczema. Relationship between plasma essential fatty acid changes and clinical response. Br J Dermatol 1989;121:75-90.

    10. Berth-Jones J, Graham-Brown RAC. Placebo-controlled trial of essential fatty acid supplementation in atopic dermatitis. Lancet 1993;341:1557-60.

    Skin Ulcers
    Dose: 1,500 mg with each meal

    A preliminary report suggested that evening primrose oil improves blood flow to the legs and heals or reduces the size of venous leg ulcers.1 No controlled research has further investigated this claim.

    References

    1. Simpson LO, Hand BI, Olds RJ. Large leg ulcers, Efamol and hyperbaric oxygen. N Z Med J 1986;99:552 [abstract].

    Rheumatoid Arthritis
    Dose: 540 to 1,100 mg daily of GLA

    Oils containing the omega-6 fatty acid gamma linolenic acid (GLA)-borage oil,1, 2, 3 black currant seed oil,4 and evening primrose oil (EPO)5, 6-have been reported to be effective in the treatment for people with RA. Although the best effects have been reported with use of borage oil, that may be because more GLA was used in borage oil trials (1.1-2.8 grams per day) compared with trials using black currant seed oil or EPO. The results with EPO have been mixed and confusing, possibly because the placebo used in those trials (olive oil) may have anti-inflammatory activity. In a double-blind trial, positive results were seen when EPO was used in combination with fish oil.7 GLA appears to be effective because it is converted in part to prostaglandin E1, a hormone-like substance known to have anti-inflammatory activity.

    References

    1. Pullman-Mooar S, Laposata M, Lem D, et al. Alteration of the cellular fatty acid profile and the production of eicosanoids in human monocytes by gamma-linolenic acid. Arthritis Rheum 1990;33:1526-33.

    2. Leventhal LJ, Boyce EG, Zurier RB. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with gammalinolenic acid. Ann Intern Med 1993;119:867-73.

    3. Zurier RB, Rossetti RG, Jacobson EW, et al. Gamma-linolenic acid treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial. Arthritis Rheum 1996;39:1808-17.

    4. Leventahn LJ, Boyce EG, Zuerier RB. Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis with black currant seed oil. Br J Rheumatol 1994;33:847-52.

    5. Brzeski M, Madhok R, Capell HA. Evening primrose oil in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and side-effects of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Brit J Rheumatol 1991;30:370-2.

    6. Jantti J, Seppala E, Vapaatalo H, Isomaki H. Evening primrose oil and olive oil in treatment of rheumatoid arthritis. Clin Rheumatol 1989;8:238-44.

    7. Belch JJ, Ansell D, Madhok R, et al. Effects of altering dietary essential fatty acids on requirements for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: a double blind placebo controlled study. Ann Rheum Dis 1988;47:96-104.

    Atherosclerosis
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    Though low levels (2 grams per day) of evening primrose oil appear to be without action,1 3-4 grams per day have lowered cholesterol in double-blind research.2 Lowering cholesterol levels should in turn reduce the risk of atherosclerosis.

    Preliminary research shows that chondroitin sulfate may prevent atherosclerosis in animals and humans and may also prevent heart attacks in people who already have atherosclerosis.3, 4 However, further research is needed to determine the value of chondroitin sulfate supplements for preventing or treating atherosclerosis.

    References

    1. Boberg M, Vessby B, Selinus I. Effects of dietary supplementation with n-6 and n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on serum lipoproteins and platelet function in hypertriglcyeridaemic patients. Acta Med Scand 1986;220:153-60.

    2. Horrobin DF, Manku MS. How do polyunsaturated fatty acids lower plasma cholesterol levels? Lipids 1983;558-62.

    3. Morrison LM, Branwood AW, Ershoff BH, et al. The prevention of coronary arteriosclerotic heart disease with chondroitin sulfate A: Preliminary report. Exp Med Surg 1969;27:278-89.

    4. Morrison LM, Enrick NL. Coronary heart disease: reduction of death rate by chondroitin sulfate A. Angiology 1973;24:269-87.

    Intermittent Claudication
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    Caution: One study showed a slightly increased risk of vascular surgery among people with intermittent claudication who took beta-carotene supplements.1 Until more is known, people with intermittent claudication wishing to use beta-carotene supplements should first consult with their doctor.

    References

    1. Tornwall ME, Virtamo J, Haukka JK, et al. The effect of alpha-tocopherol and beta-carotene supplementation on symptoms and progression of intermittent claudication in a controlled trial. Atherosclerosis 1999;147:193-7.

    Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    A greater intake of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oils has been linked to reduced risk of COPD,1 though research has yet to investigate whether fish oil supplements would help people with COPD. In a double-blind trial, people with COPD received a fatty acid supplement (providing daily 760 mg of GLA [gamma-linolenic acid], 1,200 mg of ALA [alpha-linolenic acid], 700 mg of EPA [eicosapentaenoic acid], and 340 mg of DHA [docosahexaenoic acid]) or a placebo (80% palm oil and 20% sunflower oil) during an eight-week rehabilitation program. Compared with the placebo, the fatty acid supplement significantly improved exercise capacity.2 While two of the fatty acids supplied in this supplement (EPA and DHA acid) are found in fish oil, it is not known which components of the supplement were most responsible for the improvement. Gamma-linolenic acid is found in evening primrose oil, black currant seed oil, and borage oil; alpha-linolenic acid is found in flaxseed oil and other oils.

    References

    1. Shahar E, Folsom AR, Melnick SL, et al. Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and smoking-related chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study Investigators. N Engl J Med 1994;331:228-33.

    2. Broekhuizen R, Wouters EFM, Creutzberg EC, et al. Polyunsaturated fatty acids improve exercise capacity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Thorax 2005;60:376-82.

    Raynaud's Disease
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    Fatty acids in evening primrose oil (EPO) inhibit the formation of biochemical messengers (prostaglandins) that promote blood vessel constriction. A double-blind trial of 21 people with Raynaud's disease found that, compared with placebo, supplementation with EPO reduced the number and severity of attacks despite the fact that blood flow did not appear to increase.1 Researchers have used 3,000-6,000 mg of EPO per day.

    References

    1. Belch JJF, Shaw B, O'Dowd A, et al. Evening primrose oil (Efamol) in the treatment of Raynaud's phenomenon: A double-blind study. Throm Haemost 1985;54(2):490-4.

    Attention Deficit-Hyperactivity Disorder
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    A deficiency of several essential fatty acids has been observed in some children with ADHD compared with unaffected children.1, 2 One study gave children with ADHD evening primrose oil supplements in an attempt to correct the problem.3 Although a degree of benefit was seen, results were not pronounced. In a 12-week double-blind study, children with ADHD were given either a placebo or a fatty-acid supplement providing daily: 186 mg of eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), 480 mg of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), 96 mg of gamma-linolenic acid (GLA), 864 mg of linoleic acid, and 42 mg of arachidonic acid. Compared with the placebo, the fatty-acid supplement produced significant improvements in both cognitive function and behavioral problems.4 No adverse effects were seen. In a preliminary trial, supplementation with approximately 400 mg of flaxseed oil and 25 mg of vitamin C, each twice a day for three months, was associated with an improvement of symptoms in children with ADHD.5

    References

    1. Mitchell EA, Aman MG, Turbott SH, Manku M. Clinical characteristics and serum essential fatty acid levels in hyperactive children. Clin Pediatr 1987;26:406-11.

    2. Stevens LJ, Zentall SS, Deck JL, et al. Essential fatty acid metabolism in boys with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder. Am J Clin Nutr 1995;62:761-8.

    3. Aman MG, Mitchell EA, Turbott SH. The effects of essential fatty acid supplementation by Efamol in hyperactive children. J Abnorm Child Psychol 1987;15:75-90.

    4. Richardson AJ, Puri BK. A randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the effects of supplementation with highly unsaturated fatty acids on ADHD-related symptoms in children with specific learning difficulties. Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 2002;26:233-9.

    5. Joshi K, Lad S, Kale M, et al. Supplementation with flax oil and vitamin C improves the outcome of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids 2006;74:17-21.

    Type 2 Diabetes
    Dose: 4 grams dailySupplementing with 4 grams of evening primrose oil per day for six months has been found in double-blind research to improve nerve function and to relieve pain symptoms of diabetic neuropathy.1 However, the principal investigator who conducted these clinical trials was subsequently found by the professional conduct committee of the General Medical Council (United Kingdom) to have falsified the results of the research.2 Therefore, it is not clear whether evening primrose oil or GLA is of any value for patients with diabetic neuropathy.
    References

    1. Jamal GA, Carmichael H. The effect of gamma-linolenic acid on human diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Diabet Med 1990;7:319-23.

    2. Dyer O. GMC reprimands doctor for research fraud. BMJ 2003;326:730.

    Type 1 Diabetes
    Dose: See Learn More for details Supplementing with 4 grams of evening primrose oil per day for six months has been found in double-blind research to improve nerve function and to relieve pain symptoms in people with diabetic nerve damage (neuropathy).1 However, the principal investigator who conducted these clinical trials was subsequently found by the professional conduct committee of the General Medical Council (United Kingdom) to have falsified the results of the research.2 Therefore, it is not clear whether evening primrose oil or GLA is of any value for patients with diabetic neuropathy.
    References

    1. Jamal GA, Carmichael H. The effect of gamma-linolenic acid on human diabetic peripheral neuropathy: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Diabet Med 1990;7:319-23.

    2. Dyer O. GMC reprimands doctor for research fraud. BMJ 2003;326:730.

    Irritable Bowel Syndrome and PMS
    Dose: Refer to label instructions

    In one trial, women with IBS who experienced worsening symptoms before and during their menstrual period were helped by taking enough evening primrose oil (EPO) to provide 360-400 mg of gamma linolenic acid (GLA) per day.1 In that trial more than half reported improvement with EPO, but none was helped in the placebo group. The effects of EPO in other groups of IBS sufferers have not been explored.

    References

    1. Cotterell CJ, Lee AJ, Hunter JO. Double-blind cross-over trial of evening primrose oil in women with menstrually-related irritable bowel syndrome. In Omega-6 Essential Fatty Acids: Pathophysiology and roles in clinical medicine, Alan R Liss, New York, 1990, 421-6.

    Evening primrose oil (EPO), comes from the seeds of the evening primrose plant. Like black currant seed oil and borage oil, EPO contains gamma linolenic acid (GLA), a fatty acid that the body converts to a hormone-like substance called prostaglandin E1 (PGE1).

    Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

    The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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    Ratings and Reviews

    REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

    by PowerReviews
    GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300
     
    4.6

    (based on 81 reviews)

    97%

    of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

    Pros

    • Effective (62)
    • Good value (39)
    • No side effects (26)
    • Good taste (12)
    • Long lasting (9)

    Cons

    • Complicated to take (11)
    • Side effects (3)

    Best Uses

    • Daily use (70)
    • Good supplement (33)
    • Preventative (11)
    • Good alternative (9)
    • Recovery (4)
      • Reviewer Profile:
      • First time user (47), Health conscious (34)

    Reviewed by 81 customers

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    4.0

    review

    By mooncake18

    from wi

    About Me First Time User, Health Conscious

    See all my reviews

    Pros

    • Effective
    • No Side Effects

    Cons

    • Large

    Best Uses

    • Daily Use
    • Good Supplement

    Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

    I was recommend this from a relative to help ease my menstrual aches. I take one daily. I can feel a difference

    (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    Great Product

    By Alexa

    from Illinois

    About Me First Time User

    See all my reviews

    Pros

    • Effective

    Cons

    • Large Pill
    • Smell

    Best Uses

    • Daily Use

    Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

    This product really is great. My only concern with it is the size of the pills. They are HUGE. Also, there is a slightly fishy smell although it is not fish oil. I have noticed a difference in my nails and skin, along with my overall mood.

    (0 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

     
    5.0

    So good

    By fuse.sky

    from Atlanta,GA

    About Me First Time User

    See all my reviews

    Verified Buyer

    Pros

    • Effective
    • No Side Effects

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Daily Use
      • Recovery

      Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

      I love it.
      Help me didn't get stomach age because of menstruation.

      (0 of 2 customers found this review helpful)

       
      5.0

      Good item

      By clyd.520

      from Oxford ,Ohio

      About Me First Time User

      See all my reviews

      Pros

      • Effective

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Daily Use

        Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

        It is a good item. I take it everyday.

        (3 of 3 customers found this review helpful)

         
        5.0

        great product

        By niyan1206

        from us

        About Me First Time User

        See all my reviews

        Pros

        • Effective

        Cons

        • Complicated To Take

        Best Uses

        • Daily Use

        Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

        it is a great product to support hormonal balance

        (0 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

         
        4.0

        very good

        By littlerabbit7

        from Tennessee

        About Me First Time User

        See all my reviews

        Pros

        • Good Value

        Cons

        • Side Effects

        Best Uses

        • Daily Use

        Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

        I have it everyday

         
        5.0

        great product

        By ypink7

        from El Cerrito, CA

        About Me Health Conscious

        See all my reviews

        Pros

        • Effective
        • Good Value
        • No Side Effects

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Daily Use
          • Good Supplement

          Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

          Great for my skin

          (3 of 6 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          Satisfied. Hope it effective

          By Niceday2001

          from De

          About Me First Time User

          See all my reviews

          Verified Buyer

          Pros

          • Effective
          • Good Taste
          • Good Value
          • Long Lasting

          Cons

            Best Uses

            • Daily Use
            • Good Supplement

            Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

            I will buy it again and again,if it is effective

            (1 of 5 customers found this review helpful)

             
            5.0

            I would buy this product again and again

            By jhy2004jy

            from windy,ca

            About Me First Time User

            See all my reviews

            Verified Buyer

            Pros

            • Effective
            • Good Taste

            Cons

              Best Uses

              • Daily Use

              Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

              Things that are great about it

              (12 of 12 customers found this review helpful)

               
              4.0

              Great Product

              By jmarti1508

              from Phoenix, AZ

              About Me Health Conscious

              See all my reviews

              Pros

              • Effective
              • No Side Effects

              Cons

                Best Uses

                • Daily Use
                • Good Supplement

                Comments about GNC Women's Evening Primrose Oil 1300:

                I take one supplement a day. Since using them for approximately three months my skin is smooth and my hair and nails grow fast. I do believe it also helps with my PMS mood swings. The one and only negative I would comment on is the smell but I pop it in my mouth and wash it down quickly.

                Displaying reviews 1-10

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