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Now® Cinnamon Cassia Oil

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1 fl. oz. (30mL)

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Description
100% Pure & Natural
Cinnamomum cassia
Chinese Cinnamon
Aromatherapeuric
GC/IR Verified

Embraced by both Asian and European cultures for centuries, NOW® Cinnamon Cassia Oil is steam distilled from the bark of Cinnamomum cassia. Possessing the characteristic warm, spicy cinnamon aroma, this essential oil is 100% Pure and Natural.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

For aromatherapy use. For all other uses, carefully dilute with a carrier oil such as jojoba, grapeseed, olive, or almond oil prior to use. Please consult an essential oil book or other professional reference source for suggested dilution ratios.

Warning: Natural essential oils are highly concentrated and should be used with care.
ALWAYS DILUTE BEFORE ANY USE OTHER THAN AROMATHERAPY.KEEP OUT OF REACH OF CHILDREN. AVOID CONTACTWITH EYES. IF PREGNANT OR LACTATING, CONSULT A PRACTITIONERBEFORE USE. NOT FOR INTERNAL USE.

Manufactured by
NOW Foods, Bloomingdale, IL 60108, USA
Visit us at www.nowfoods.com

Health Notes

Cinnamon

Cinnamon
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: 1 to 6 grams daily
Cinnamon may improve glucose utilization in people with type 2 diabetes.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Cinnamon is a gas-relieving herb that may be helpful in calming an upset stomach.(more)
Yeast Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions
The essential oil of cinnamon contains various chemicals that are believed to be responsible for cinnamon's antifungal effects.(more)
Menorrhagia
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Cinnamon has been used historically for the treatment of various menstrual disorders, including heavy menstruation.(more)
Menorrhagia
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Cinnamon has been used historically for the treatment of various menstrual disorders, including heavy menstruation.(more)
Colic
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Cinnamon is a gas-relieving herb used in traditional medicine to treat colic. It is generally given by healthcare professionals as teas or decoctions to the infant.(more)
Type 2 Diabetes
Dose: 1 to 6 grams dailyTest tube studies have suggested that cinnamon may improve glucose utilization. In a study of people with type 2 diabetes, supplementing with cinnamon in the amount of 1, 3, or 6 grams per day for 40 days was significantly more effective than a placebo at reducing blood glucose levels.1 The reduction averaged 18 to 29% in the three treatments groups, and 1 gram per day was as effective as 3 and 6 grams per day. The benefits of cinnamon for lowering blood sugar levels was confirmed in a double-blind study.2 However, in two other double-blind studies, cinnamon was not more effective than a placebo.3, 4 The different results in these studies may have been due in part to differences in body weight, initial blood sugar levels, and medication use among the different populations studied.
References

1. Khan A, Safdar M, Ali Khan MM, et al. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of people with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2003;26:3215-8.

2. Akilen R, Tsiami A, Devendra D, Robinson N. Glycated haemoglobin and blood pressure-lowering effect of cinnamon in multi-ethnic Type 2 diabetic patients in the UK: a randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind clinical trial. Diabet Med 2010;27:1159-67.

3. Vanschoonbeek K, Thomassen BJ, Senden JM, et al. Cinnamon supplementation does not improve glycemic control in postmenopausal type 2 diabetes patients. J Nutr2006;136:977-80.

4. Blevins SM, Leyva MJ, Brown J, et al. Effect of cinnamon on glucose and lipid levels in non insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care 2007;30:2236-7.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.1

There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise, Basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, dill, ginger, oregano, rosemary, sage, lavender, and thyme.2 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.3 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4-6 grams of sage leaf.4 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

References

1. Forster HB, Niklas H, Lutz S. Antispasmodic effects of some medicinal plants. Planta Med 1980;40:303-19.

2. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 425-6.

3. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 185-6.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 198.

Yeast Infection
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The essential oil of cinnamon contains various chemicals that are believed to be responsible for cinnamon's medicinal effects. Important among these compounds are eugenol and cinnamaldehyde. Cinnamaldehyde and cinnamon oil vapors exhibit extremely potent antifungal properties in test tubes.1 In a preliminary study in people with AIDS, topical application of cinnamon oil was effective against oral thrush.2

References

1. Singh HB, Srivastava M, Singh AB, Srivastava AK. Cinnamon bark oil, a potent fungitoxicant against fungi causing respiratory tract mycoses. Allergy 1995;50:995-9.

2. Quale JM, Landman D, Zaman MM, et al. In vitro activity of Cinnamomum zeylanicum against azole resistant and sensitive candida species and a pilot study of cinnamon for oral candidiasis. Am J Chin Med 1996;24:103-9.

Menorrhagia
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Cinnamon has been used historically for the treatment of various menstrual disorders, including heavy menstruation.1 This is also the case with shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris).2 Other herbs known as astringents (tannin-containing plants that tend to decrease discharges), such as cranesbill, periwinkle, witch hazel, and oak, were traditionally used for heavy menstruation. Human trials are lacking, so the usefulness of these herbs is unknown. Black horehound was sometimes used traditionally for heavy periods, though this approach has not been investigated by modern research.

References

1. Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 168-70.

2. Ellingwood F. American Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacognosy. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1919, 1998, 354.

Menorrhagia
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Cinnamon has been used historically for the treatment of various menstrual disorders, including heavy menstruation.1 This is also the case with shepherd's purse (Capsella bursa-pastoris).2 Other herbs known as astringents (tannin-containing plants that tend to decrease discharges), such as cranesbill, periwinkle, witch hazel, and oak, were traditionally used for heavy menstruation. Human trials are lacking, so the usefulness of these herbs is unknown. Black horehound was sometimes used traditionally for heavy periods, though this approach has not been investigated by modern research.

References

1. Leung AY, Foster S. Encyclopedia of Common Natural Ingredients Used in Foods, Drugs, and Cosmetics, 2d ed. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 1996, 168-70.

2. Ellingwood F. American Materia Medica, Therapeutics and Pharmacognosy. Sandy, OR: Eclectic Medical Publications, 1919, 1998, 354.

Colic
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Several gas-relieving herbs used in traditional medicine for colic are approved in Germany for intestinal spasms.1 These include yarrow, garden angelica (Angelica archangelica),peppermint, cinnamon, and fumitory (Fumaria officinalis). These herbs are generally given by healthcare professionals as teas or decoctions to the infant. Peppermint tea should be used with caution in infants and young children, as they may choke in reaction to the strong menthol.

References

1. Schilcher H. Phytotherapy in Paediatrics. Stuttgart: Medpharm Scientific Publishers, 1997, 80.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Most people are familiar with the sweet but pungent taste of the oil, powder, or sticks of bark from the cinnamon tree. Cinnamon trees grow in a number of tropical areas, including parts of India, China, Madagascar, Brazil, and the Caribbean.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

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Ratings and Reviews

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NNFNow® Cinnamon Cassia Oil
 
2.5

(based on 2 reviews)

Reviewed by 2 customers

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1.0

rather flat

By whitewrights

from north TX

About Me Brand Buyer

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Pros

  • Fragrant

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      Comments about NNF Now® Cinnamon Cassia Oil:

      smells cheap and not at all like a pure eo

       
      4.0

      Good product/bad shipping conditions

      By ruby.cherries

      from OH

      About Me Budget Buyer

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      • Effective

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          Comments about NNF Now® Cinnamon Cassia Oil:

          I was very desappointed from the shipping conditions: The box where the oil was put in smelled so much cinnamon, when I oppened it the bottle was opened. It spilled just a little (since it's an essantial oil bottle it doesn't spill easily), but still...??? How can you send an essantial oil OPENED?????

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