Product Images
Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel - THAYER - GNC Zoom
Product Videos

Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel

Shop all Thayers

12 fluid ounce(s)

Item #378202 See Product Details

Price: $9.95

Member Price: $7.96 Become a Member

Availability: In Stock Details

Available Promotions:

  • $3.99 Flat Rate Shipping! Details

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $9.95

Member Price: $7.96 Become a Member
Ship every:
Add to Cart
You May Also Be Interested In
More Sizes Available
Description
Alcohol-Free Toner with Aloe Vera
  • Gentle
  • Moisturizes
  • Soothes


A natural gentle skin toner derived from a Native-American formula. Now people with sensitive skin have an Alcohol-Free Lavender Witch Hazel Toner, with delicate, soothing, calming natural Lavender water. With Thayers exclusive Witch Hazel Extract with Aloe Vera Formula, this all-natural toner for healthy-looking skin adds moisture while protecting the skin from airborne impurities, and is an alternative to drying astringents. Witch Hazel is a natural anti-inflammatory that helps tighten pores and reduce swelling.
Supplement Facts

Apply with a cotton ball to cleanse, soften, refresh and protect skin. Use anytime throughout the day as a softening refresher.

Serving Size 0 fluid ounce(s)

Other Ingredients: Purified Water, Thayers proprietary Witch Hazel extract, Lavender fragrance, lavender water, Aloe Vera, Vitamin E Acetate, Methylparaben (a natural, gentle preservative), Polysorbate 20 (emulsifier derived from coconut oil), Propylene glycol (humectant used to attract moisture)

Questions or Comments?
Contact Wendy Gehr
1-888-THAYER-1
info@thayers.com
Monday-Friday 9 am to 5 pm EST
HENRY THAYER COMPANY
P.O. BOX 56
Westport CT 06881

Health Notes

Lavender

Lavender
This nutrient has been used in connection with the following health goals
  • Reliable and relatively consistent scientific data showing a substantial health benefit.
  • Contradictory, insufficient, or preliminary studies suggesting a health benefit or minimal health benefit.
  • For an herb, supported by traditional use but minimal or no scientific evidence. For a supplement, little scientific support.

Our proprietary "Star-Rating" system was developed to help you easily understand the amount of scientific support behind each supplement in relation to a specific health condition. While there is no way to predict whether a vitamin, mineral, or herb will successfully treat or prevent associated health conditions, our unique ratings tell you how well these supplements are understood by the medical community, and whether studies have found them to be effective for other people.

For over a decade, our team has combed through thousands of research articles published in reputable journals. To help you make educated decisions, and to better understand controversial or confusing supplements, our medical experts have digested the science into these three easy-to-follow ratings. We hope this provides you with a helpful resource to make informed decisions towards your health and well-being.

This supplement has been used in connection with the following health conditions:

Insomnia
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Lavender oil's aroma is known to be calming and may be helpful in some cases of insomnia.(more)
Anxiety
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In a double-blind trial, a proprietary lavender oil preparation (silexan) provided significant symptom relief to people with generalized anxiety disorder.(more)
Anxiety
Dose: Refer to label instructions
In a double-blind trial, a proprietary lavender oil preparation (silexan) provided significant symptom relief to people with generalized anxiety disorder.(more)
Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions
Lavender is a gas-relieving herb that may be helpful in calming an upset stomach.(more)
Perineal Pain after Childbirth
Dose: Add several drops to a bath
In one study, adding lavender oil to a bath helped relieve perineal pain after childbirth.(more)
Insomnia
Dose: Refer to label instructions

The volatile oil of lavender contains many medicinal components, including perillyl alcohol, linalool, and geraniol. The oil's aroma is known to be calming and thus may be helpful in some cases of insomnia.1 One study of elderly people with sleeping troubles found that inhaling lavender oil was as effective as some commonly prescribed sleep medications.2 Similar results were seen in another trial that included young and middle aged people with insomnia.3 Teas made from lavender flowers or from the oil (1 to 4 drops) are approved for internal use by the German Commission E for people with insomnia.4 Internal use of essential oils can be dangerous and should be done only with the supervision of a trained herbalist or healthcare professional.

References

1. Buchbauer G, Jirovetz L, Jager W, et al. Aromatherapy: Evidence for sedative effects of the essential oil of lavender after inhalation. Z Naturforsch [C] 1991;46:1067-72.

2. Hardy M, Kirk-Smith MD, Stretch DD. Replacement of drug therapy for insomnia by ambient odour. Lancet 1995;346:701 [letter].

3. Lewith GT, Godfrey AD, Prescott P. A single-blinded, randomized pilot study evaluating the aroma of Lavandula augustifolia as a treatment for mild insomnia. J Altern Complement Med 2005;11:631-7.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 159-60.

Anxiety
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIn a double-blind trial, individuals with anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder) received 80 mg per day of a proprietary lavender oil preparation (silexan, 80 mg once a day) or a low dose of an anti-anxiety drug (lorazepam, 0.5 mg once a day) for 6 weeks. Significant improvement was seen in both groups, and the degree of improvement was similar in both treatment groups.1
References

1. Woelk H, Schlafke S. A multi-center, double-blind, randomized study of the Lavender oil preparation Silexan in comparison to Lorazepam for generalized anxiety disorder. Phytomedicine 2010;17:94-99.

Anxiety
Dose: Refer to label instructionsIn a double-blind trial, individuals with anxiety (generalized anxiety disorder) received 80 mg per day of a proprietary lavender oil preparation (silexan, 80 mg once a day) or a low dose of an anti-anxiety drug (lorazepam, 0.5 mg once a day) for 6 weeks. Significant improvement was seen in both groups, and the degree of improvement was similar in both treatment groups.1
References

1. Woelk H, Schlafke S. A multi-center, double-blind, randomized study of the Lavender oil preparation Silexan in comparison to Lorazepam for generalized anxiety disorder. Phytomedicine 2010;17:94-99.

Indigestion, Heartburn, and Low Stomach Acidity
Dose: Refer to label instructions

Carminatives (also called aromatic digestive tonics or aromatic bitters) may be used to relieve symptoms of indigestion, particularly when there is excessive gas. It is believed that carminative agents work, at least in part, by relieving spasms in the intestinal tract.1

There are numerous carminative herbs, including European angelica root (Angelica archangelica), anise, Basil, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves, coriander, dill, ginger, oregano, rosemary, sage, lavender, and thyme.2 Many of these are common kitchen herbs and thus are readily available for making tea to calm an upset stomach. Rosemary is sometimes used to treat indigestion in the elderly by European herbal practitioners.3 The German Commission E monograph suggests a daily intake of 4-6 grams of sage leaf.4 Pennyroyal is no longer recommended for use in people with indigestion, however, due to potential side effects.

References

1. Forster HB, Niklas H, Lutz S. Antispasmodic effects of some medicinal plants. Planta Med 1980;40:303-19.

2. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 425-6.

3. Weiss RF. Herbal Medicine. Beaconsfield, UK: Beaconsfield Publishers Ltd, 1988, 185-6.

4. Blumenthal M, Busse WR, Goldberg A, et al. (eds). The Complete German Commission E Monographs: Therapeutic Guide to Herbal Medicines. Austin: American Botanical Council and Boston: Integrative Medicine Communications, 1998, 198.

Perineal Pain after Childbirth
Dose: Add several drops to a bath

In one study, the addition of lavender oil to a bath was more effective than a placebo in relieving perineal pain after childbirth (the perineum is the area between the vulva and the anus.)1 The improvement was not statistically significant, however, so more research is needed to determine whether lavender oil is truly effective.

References

1. Dale A, Cornwell S. The role of lavender oil in relieving perineal discomfort following childbirth: A blind randomized trial. J Adv Nursing 1994;19:89-96.

Parts Used & Where Grown

Eastern European countries, particularly Bulgaria, as well as France, Britain, Australia, and Russia grow large quantities of lavender. The fragrant flowers of lavender are used in the preparation of herbal medicines.

Copyright 2014 Aisle7. All rights reserved. Aisle7.com

The information presented in Aisle7 is for informational purposes only. It is based on scientific studies (human, animal, or in vitro), clinical experience, or traditional usage as cited in each article. The results reported may not necessarily occur in all individuals. For many of the conditions discussed, treatment with prescription or over the counter medication is also available. Consult your doctor, practitioner, and/or pharmacist for any health problem and before using any supplements or before making any changes in prescribed medications. Information expires June 2015.

Label
To view the Label you will need Adobe Acrobat Reader installed. You can download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader at: http://www.adobe.com/acrobat/readstep.html
Ratings and Reviews

REVIEW SNAPSHOT®

by PowerReviews
Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel
 
4.8

(based on 4 reviews)

100%

of respondents would recommend this to a friend.

Pros

  • Gentle (3)
  • Smells great (3)

Cons

    Best Uses

    • Daily use (3)

    Reviewed by 4 customers

    Sort by

    Displaying reviews 1-4

    Back to top

     
    4.0

    good

    By dxyou_1989

    from NJ

    About Me First Time User

    See all my reviews

    Pros

    • Gentle
    • Smells good

    Cons

      Best Uses

      • Daily Use
      • Women

      Comments about Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel:

      no alcohol and very gentle. will buy again

       
      5.0

      Comfortable toner

      By zjnbbetty

      from Il

      About Me First Time User

      See all my reviews

      Verified Buyer

      Pros

      • Effective
      • Good Taste
      • Good Value
      • Long Lasting
      • No Side Effects

      Cons

        Best Uses

        • Daily Use
        • Good Supplement

        Comments about Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel:

        It is good to be the the base of mask.

         
        5.0

        good,and cheap

        By rabbit870802

        from garden city, NY

        About Me Brand Buyer

        See all my reviews

        Verified Buyer

        Pros

        • Balances Skin
        • Gentle
        • Leaves Clean Feel
        • Moisturizing
        • Smells Great

        Cons

          Best Uses

          • Combination Skin
          • Sensitive Skin

          Comments about Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel:

          I like the smell and the feeling after using the toner, and it is very good at brightening skin

          (3 of 4 customers found this review helpful)

           
          5.0

          A God Send

          By Dcallowa

          from Tacoma WA

          About Me Brand Buyer

          See all my reviews

          Pros

          • Balances Skin
          • Gentle
          • Improves Skin Texture
          • Leaves Clean Feel
          • Moisturizing
          • Not Greasy
          • Refreshing
          • Smells Great
          • Soothing

          Cons

          • Bottle is pretty

          Best Uses

          • Acne-Prone Skin
          • All Skin Types
          • Combination Skin
          • Daily Use
          • Dry Skin
          • Oily Skin
          • Sensitive Skin

          Comments about Thayers® Lavender Witch Hazel:

          My acne prone super sensitive/ reactive dry skin loves this product. In the 3 days since I bought this my acne has reduced and the ones that havent healed yet are less red and inflames, pores aren't as clogged and when I spritz it on the afternoon my face feels clean and wakes me up. My skin has a new glow :) I use the rose in he morning and the lavender at night.

          Displaying reviews 1-4

          Back to top

          Ask A Question