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Century Systems The Cleaner® - Women's Formula

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104 Capsules

Item #318505 See Product Details

Price: $29.99

Member Price: $27.99 Become a Member

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Description
The Ultimate Body Detox - Helps Remove Waste Pounds
  • Colon
  • Liver
  • Parasites
  • Skin
  • Urinary
  • Kidneys
  • Toxins
  • Blood
  • Lungs
  • Stomach
  • Yeast

Powerful, Comfortable & Easy, Fast Acting All-In-One Formula


The Cleaner® is a powerful total internal cleansing support system. It includes organ and parasite cleansing in easy to swallow capsules. After use of The Cleaner®, clothes may fit loosely in the stomach area due to the elimination of waste. Contains two 7-day detoxes. The Cleaner® is fast and powerful yet gentle enough to allow you to travel, work and continue your normal routine. The Cleaner® uses vegetable capsules instead of gelatin for those who desire an animal free detox.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Supplement Facts

Take 4 capsules (average dose) on the evening of day 1, then take 4 capsules in the morning and 4 in the evening on days 2 through 7. Drink 8-10 glasses of water per day. If stools become watery, stop taking until stool solidifies and restart with 1-2 capsules. If not having at least one bowel movement per day, take up to 8 capsules per dose until regular. Do not use for more than 7 consecutive days unless directed by a doctor.

Serving Size 4 Capsules
Servings Per Container 26
Amount Per Serving % DV
Zinc (as Zinc Citrate) 7.50 mg 50%
The Cleaner proprietary blend 1750.00 mg **
 Psyllium Husks **
 apple pectin **
 soy fiber **
 Oat Bran **
 Ginger Root **
 peppermint leaf **
 Schizandra berry extract (9% schizandrins) **
 Calcium Citrate **
 gum acacia **
 milk Thistle Extract (80% silymarin) **
 Magnesium Citrate **
 Elecampane Root Extract **
 Bentonite **
 Fibersol-2 soluble maltodextrin fiber **
 Senna Leaf Extract (10% sennosides) **
 aloe vera gel (from 200:1 concentrate) **
 Yellow Dock Root **
 Dandelion root 4:1 extract **
 clove (dried buds) **
 black walnut bark **
 chastetree berry **
 Dong Quai Root Extract **
 Caprylic Acid **
 Triphala extract (contains amla fruit bibhitaki fruit & haritaki) **
 Cat's Claw Bark **
 FOS probiotic growth complex (fructo-oligosaccharides) **
 blessed thistle (leaves and flowering tops) **
 red clover 4:1 extract (aerial parts) **
 wormwood (flower) **
 Goldenseal root extract (5% alkaloids) **
 Corn Silk (stylus) **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Other Ingredients: Microcrystalline Cellulose, Magnesium Stearate, Silica

Storage Instructions: Store at a controlled room temperature of 15-30°C/59°-86°F

Do not use if seal is broken or missing.

Protect from heat, light, and moisture.

Warning: Read and follow directions carefully. Do not use if you have or develop diarrhea, loose stools, or abdominal pain because senna may worsen these conditions and be harmful to your heath. Consult your physician if you have frequent diarrhea or if you are pregnant or nursing. Consult your physician if you are taking medications or have a medical condition. Not for children under 12. If you have an allergic reaction to any of the herbs, stop use immediately and seek medical attention. If you have or develop diarrhea, loose stools, or abdominal pain with 1-2 capsules, stop use.

Contains soy and may contain wheat.

Century Systems, Atlanta, GA

Health Notes

Women: Switching from Carbs to Proteins May Help Hormonal Disorder

Women: Switching from Carbs to Proteins May Help Hormonal Disorder
Women: Switching from Carbs to Proteins May Help Hormonal Disorder: Main Image
A high-protein diet offers more control to women with polycystic ovary syndrome
The high-protein, low-carbohydrate diet has been popularized in recent years as a heart-healthy weight-loss diet. In a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, blood sugar control, weight loss, and cardiac risk were all improved in women with a common hormonal disorder known as polycystic ovary syndrome.

Poly, what?

Polycystic ovary syndrome is a condition that affects the hormone balance in women, favoring the production of male hormones like testosterone over female hormones like estrogen and progesterone. This imbalance can lead to symptoms such as menstrual problems and infertility. Many women with this condition also develop insulin resistance, diabetes, obesity, and cardiovascular disease.

Looking to dietary protein for help

The new study included data collected from 27 women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Participants were assigned to either a high-protein diet or a standard-protein diet for six months. Both groups received regular nutritional counseling and were guided to reduce their intake of sweets and soft drinks.

The aim of the high-protein diet was to get 40% or more of each day's calories from protein and less than 30% of calories from carbohydrate. To achieve this, women in the high-protein-diet group were instructed to replace sugary and starchy foods with either protein-rich foods like meat, eggs, fish, and dairy foods, or with vegetables, fruits, and nuts. The aim of the standard-protein diet was to get less than 15% of calories from protein and more than 55% of calories from carbohydrate. There were no calorie restrictions with either diet.

A high-protein diet wins

At the end of the study, the following differences between the groups were seen:

  • Women on the high-protein diet lost 4.4 kilograms (10 pounds) more than women on the standard-protein diet.
  • Almost all of the extra weight lost by the women eating the high-protein diet was body fat, not muscle.
  • The high-protein diet was associated with a greater reduction in waist circumference, indicating a greater loss of abdominal or belly fat. This type of fat has a strong link to cardiovascular disease.
  • Women on the high-protein diet had lower blood glucose and C-peptide levels. C-peptide is a protein that is linked to insulin production. These findings show that blood sugar control improved more in this group than in the standard-protein diet group.

"We found that the replacement of carbohydrates with protein in a generally unrestricted diet can lead to increased weight loss and improved blood sugar control in women with polycystic ovary syndrome," said lead study author Lone B. Sorensen, a research scientist at the University of Copenhagen in Denmark. "Our findings suggest that switching to a high-protein diet may help women with this syndrome to manage their condition and improve their overall health."

Making the switch to more protein

A high-protein diet offers more control to women with polycystic ovary syndrome by providing a way to improve their health through day-to-day food choices. The benefits of eating more protein and fewer carbohydrates-weight loss, blood sugar control, and reduction in abdominal fat-are all associated with better cardiovascular health.

Here are some changes you can make to reduce carbohydrates and increase protein:

  • From cereal to eggs. A couple of poached or hard-boiled eggs with a side of fresh fruit can be a very satisfying breakfast.
  • Lose the bread. Choose a salad with meat or fish or soups made with beans and vegetables instead of a sandwich for lunch. Have a larger portion and skip the side of bread.
  • Snack on meat. A strip of smoked turkey or a piece of grilled chicken with some raw carrots or cucumber slices can take the edge away between meals.
  • Pass on pasta. Have an extra helping of vegetables with dinner instead of potatoes, pasta, and other grains.

(Am J Clin Nutr 2012;95:39-48)

Maureen Williams, ND, completed her doctorate in naturopathic medicine at Bastyr University in Seattle and has been in private practice since 1995. With an abiding commitment to access to care, she has worked in free clinics in the US and Canada, and in rural clinics in Guatemala and Honduras where she has studied traditional herbal medicine. She currently lives and practices in Victoria, BC, and lectures and writes extensively for both professional and community audiences on topics including family nutrition, menopause, anxiety and depression, heart disease, cancer, and easing stress. Dr. Williams is a regular contributor to Healthnotes Newswire.
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