Revolution Revolution Abdominal Cuts

Revolution Revolution Abdominal Cuts - CORR-JENSEN LABS 1009787 - GNC Zoom
  • Share:

Offers:

  • Free Shipping on Orders of $49 or More. Details

Price: $21.99

In Stock Details

Item #418002

Size: 120 softgels

Auto-Delivery Available

Sign Up & Save! Enroll in Auto-Delivery and lock in your price for 12 months.

Learn More

Price: $21.99

Ship every:
Add to Cart

Product Information

Description

Stimulant free weight loss support

Formulated to support:
  • Reduction in abdominal area fat
  • Lean tissue enhancement
  • Reduction in hip fat area
  • Overall physique enhancement
  • Reduction in thigh area fat

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Label

You can download a free copy of the Adobe Acrobat Reader here.

Supplement Facts

Serving Size 1 Capsule
Servings Per Container 120
Amount Per Serving % DV
Safflower Oil (80% CLA) 500.00 mg**
Omega 3 Fish Oil (18/12) 150.00 mg**
Borage Oil (20% GLA) 75.00 mg**
Flax Seed oil (50% ALA) 50.00 mg**
Sesame Seed Oil 25.00 mg**
Vitamin E 6.70 mg **
** Daily Value (DV) not established

Product Directions / Additional Info

As a dietary supplement for adults, take 2-3 servings with each meal.

Morning: Take 2-3 servings
Mid-Afternoon: Take 2-3 servings
Dinner: Take 2-3 servings

Other Ingredients: Gelatin, Glycerin, Water

Warning: DO NOT USE IF PREGNANT OR NURSING. Consult a physician or licensed qualified health care professional before using this product if you are using any other dietary supplement, prescription drug including but not limited to anti-coagulant, anti-diabetic and/or anti-hypertensive agents, or over-the-counter drug. KEEP OUT OF THE REACH OF CHILDREN.

Corr-Jensen Labs
6341 S. Troy Circle Suite E
Centennial, CO 80111

You May Also Consider These Products:

Ask A Question

Customer Reviews

Health Notes

Cutting Back on Meat May Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Cutting Back on Meat May Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Cutting Back on Meat May Cut Type 2 Diabetes Risk: Main Image
People who ate half a serving less of red meat per day were 14% less likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes
Type 2 diabetes affects some 350 million people worldwide, but fortunately, health experts already know how to reduce risk: eat a healthy diet, get regular physical activity, maintain a normal body weight, and avoid tobacco. In addition, cutting back on red meat may help cut diabetes down to size.

Going up, going down

Do changes in our meat-eating habits affect our risk of developing diabetes? To study this question, researchers collected information on diet and other health habits from 26,357 men and 122,786 women-participants in the long-running Health Professionals Study and the Nurses' Health Study.

The study authors accounted for other factors linked with diabetes, including age, family history, race, marital status, initial red meat consumption, smoking status, physical activity level, alcohol use, calorie intake, and diet quality. During four years of follow-up, 7,540 new cases of type 2 diabetes were diagnosed in the group.

The findings suggest that red meat may be a culprit in type 2 diabetes risk. Compared with people who had no change in how much red meat they were eating over time, people who ate half a serving more of meat per day were 48% more likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, and people who ate half a serving less of red meat per day were 14% less likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes.

Weight matters

After accounting for weight gain during the study period, the additional half serving of red meat daily led to a 30% increased risk of being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes-less of a risk increase than initially noted, but still significant, even among people who did not gain weight.

Simple steps, big pay off

This study is observational, and therefore cannot prove cause and effect, but it agrees with previous research. And as lead study author An Pan, PhD notes, it's not just diabetes we need to worry about: "Our study adds more evidence to the health risks of eating high amounts of red meat, which has been associated with type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease stroke, and certain cancers in other studies."

For all of these reasons, taking some smart steps to make sure your diet isn't too heavy on the red meat makes sense:

  • Veg out. Peruse vegetarian cookbooks for tasty meatless meal ideas. You don't need to be a vegetarian, but these resources can broaden your horizons.
  • Change your focus. Instead of thinking "am I having chicken, beef, or pork," think of a dish first-say a stir fry-and how to fill it with loads of colorful vegetables. Next consider if you want to serve it with rice or noodles. This takes the focus off of meat.
  • Stay realistic. Instead of looking for non-meat items that mimic meat-an approach that leaves many meat eaters wanting-try meals that don't even require meat to feel complete, such as bean soups and root vegetable stews.

(JAMA Intern Med 2013;173:1328-35)

Suzanne Dixon, MPH, MS, RD, an author, speaker, and internationally recognized expert in chronic disease prevention, epidemiology, and nutrition, has taught medical, nursing, public health, and alternative medicine coursework. She has delivered over 150 invited lectures to health professionals and consumers and is the creator of a nutrition website acclaimed by the New York Times and Time magazine. Suzanne received her training in epidemiology and nutrition at the University of Michigan, School of Public Health at Ann Arbor.

Copyright 2016 Healthnotes, Inc. All rights reserved. www.healthnotes.com

Learn more about Healthnotes, the company.